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OUR LONDON CORRESPONDENT.…

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NEWS NOTES.

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NEWS NOTES. WAR news, almost to the exclusion of all other intelligence, absorbs the general atten- tion, and the anxiety to learn the purport of the latest despatches from the front" is intense. But the War Office authorities having virtually complete control of the telegraph from all African points are rigorously censorising all messages; and we have. in consequence, to wait until later for any details which they do not consider it advisable now to disclose. It was to be expected that some such condition of affairs would ensue. The tension of public feeling will have considerable relief when it becomes known that General Buller and his Army Corps are getting to work. General White and the colonial field force have had a heavy and difficult time to save themselves from overthrow at the hands of the concentrated foe meanwhile. The Boers have fought finely, both as mounted mobile troops, on foot, and as artillerymen; and it is a sad pity that so many brave fellows on both sides have had to fall in the working out of what all the world is convinced is, after all, a foregone conclusion. THE patriotism and devotion to their pro- fession which prompted Sir William MacCormac, Mr. Treves, Mr. Makins, and their distinguished surgical cdtleagues to lend their invaluable per- sonal surgical services in the treatment of the wounded in the war is very properly highly appreciated. Such splendid usefulness as these savants have displayed is a pleasing product of the public spirit engendered by the war-tune, if anything pleasing can come of war, that is. UNOSTENTATIOUSLY also a large number of qualified nursing sisters have gone out, and many people who cannot lend a personal hand are giving of their substance liberally towards their equipment, which is all as it should be. There is plenty of room here for all to help. WE are glad to note how admirably the funds intenuellfor the relief of the wives and little ones of the Reservists called to the colours are being supported. The Absent- minded Beggar"âas Mr. Rudyard Kipling called the Reservistâwill have much encourage- meant in his perilous duties when he knows that his countrymen have determined to take care of his dear ones whilst he is engaged in fighting for "the flag. GENERAL JOICBEPT did not like the havoc occasioned by our lyddite shells in the engage- ments in the Ladysmith vicinage. These high explosives are 'terribly effective, we knowâand he knows nowâbut the war game is not played at the twentieth century's dawn sans risk. The battling the Boers began they will have to run the racket of: for Britain is determined on all sides to see the thing through." IT was rather amusing to hear of Joubert with simulated simplicity protesting against lyddite as inhuman, for even he knows it is accepted by all the Powers as an adjunct and necessity of modern war but on the other hand we are glad to have the independent testimony of British war correspondents to the kindly-hearted characted of the Boer treat- ment of our wounded and captured. After Nicholson's Nek, the Boer behaviour was quite self-sacrificial at a very trying time; and generally Joubert and his men have been chivalrous in the extreme. We have had instances reported of individual brutality and excess but, on the whole, the Boers have in this way been kept far better in hand than any one could have expected. Honour where honour is due." OUR Government hardly expects to get the fighting over in South Africa yet awhile by the large number of horses they are securing for the military service. Hundreds of hunters are being requisitioned as chargers and remouts from the Midlands alone: and many of the best of the tram horses are being taken in some of our great towns for similar purposes. What with the moving of men, horses, and material, this war is going to make a big disturbance of the economy of our life. It may be more nearly a correct piece of prophesying on Kruger's part than some thought that the cost of the conflict will be such as will stagger humanity." But you cannot have war without that SIP. REDVEKS BULLER has had already to utilise the pigeon post for his despatch pur- poses. What a pity we cannot yet get the wireless telegraphy system into practical har- ness We suppose it will be ere long. Just now it would be of immense value. THE first message that the new commander- in-chief of the British forces in South Africa had to send to the War Office contained a notification of the sad death of poor young Egerton, of the Powerful, the gallant officer of the Naval Brigade who lost both his legs in action at Ladysmith. He was a promising young fellow, and much liked, and his uncle, the Duke of Devonshire, naturally, was very proud of him. He was promoted to commander for his distinguished conduct, but it is doubtful whether he was conscious of this recognition.

A KHAKI KILT.

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1 A WEST OF ENGLAND WORTHY.

OLLVifiK'S STATUE.

A NEW CYPHER.

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PIRACY ON THE CANTON RIVER,

CHARITABLE BEQUESTS.

THE CENTRAL BRITISH RED .CROSS…

THE ROYAL SOCIETY.

WHAT LYDDITE IS.

LORD CHARLES BERESFORD AT;1…

* '——! FASHIONABLE WEDDINGS,…

A MARVEL OF THRIFT.

.SARTI'S WILL.

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LADIES DEFEND THEIR FLAG.

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THREE YEARS ON DRY BREAD.

BENSON MEMORIAL AT WELLINGTON.

GLADSTONE STATUE.

HUNTING ACCIDENTS.

1 HOW TO PRONOUNCE SOUTH AFRICAN…

THE LANDLORD AND TENANTS OF…

- CHINA AND THE GREAT POWERS.

ONE OF THE MAKERS OF MODERN…

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