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OUR LONDON CORRESPONDENT.…

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OUR LONDON CORRESPONDENT. The keen interest which has naturally been aroused by the present hostilities in South Africa has been accountable for developments of newspaper enterprise in London, which go beyond anything ever before accomplished, or even attempted. This is being manifested not only in the rapid and repeated issue of special editions-for that form of journalistic enter- prise we always have with usâbut by arrange- ments which have been made by various news- Eapers to supply information during the later ours of each evening to the places of amuse- ment. It may be feared that, in some cases within the past fortnight, the news thus received has not been of a lurid to cheer the audience; for it is not easy to take one's plea- sure immediately after learning that our fellow- countrymen have been engaged in a further deadly struggle. This is one of the reasons why the metropolitan theatri- cal managers are just now feeling the effects of the war in diminished attendance and consequently attenuated receipts. It is not only that very many of us arc far from in a pleasure-seeking mood just now. but that the subscriptions which are so handsomely and readily flowing in for the various funds in aid of those stricken by the war are absorbing much of the money that in ordinary times would be devoted to amusement. This last is a consideration especially to be borne in mind during the week that has seen another Lord Mayor's Day. Sir John Voce Moore, the outgoing Lord Mayor 6f London, has great good reason to congratulate himself upon the striking success which has attended the two funds he opened at the Mansion House in relief of the sufferers from the Transvaal troubles. Never in the long and honourable history of Mansion House Funds has there been so prompt and full a response to an appeal as during the opening days of the Transvaal Refugee Fund: and that response, indeed, was so prompt and full that there was a fear lest it should prevent anything like equal attention to the call soon afterwards made for the aid of those stricken in the field. That fear, happily, has proved groundless, and the liberality of the British public has been splendidly shown. War is bound to carry numberless horrors in its train, but we at home are able to mitigate certain of these; and it is the duty of us all to do what lies in our power to prevent those dependent upon our killed or wounded soldiers from coming to want. In the Lord Mayor's Show of this week there was some attempt to symbolise the permanence of the City of London, and with this was associated a recognition of the new metro- politan municipalities which, under the opera- tion of the London Government Act of this year, will come into being on the next first of November. The names and boundaries of most of these are already fixed, but some diffi- cult points remain as to certain of them, and not the least difficult concerns the great East- end borough which is to be erected. No one yet knows what is to be its name, for the Parliamentary borough of Whitechapel, Limehouse, Stepney, St. George's-in-the-East, and Mile-end are absorbed, and the question is what common name will be acceptable to them all. Tower Borough" has been suggested, and this would not merely be appropriate, because the district now to be incorporated is mainly that of the ancient Tower Hamlets, but it would be a fitting tribute to the presence of the old Tower of London in their midst. There would be afforded, indeed, a splendid example of our historic continuity by the spectacle of the City of Westminster in the west, the City of London in the centre, and the Tower Borough in the east, looking across, to the Borough of Southwark on the other bank of the Thames. It is natural that just now, when we are hearing so much about the sick and wounded in war, public interest should be especially on the alert concerning ambulance work. This was manifested a few days since when General Hamilton, of the Royal Army Medical Corps, inspected one of the largest classes of instruc- tion in such work yet held in connection with the Volunteer Ambulance School of Instruc- tion. General Hamilton, in congratulating this class upon its success, observed that the task on which they were engaged might seem to some to be of less impor- tance than that of the combatant soldier; but he pointed out that it often required more bravery and cool courage to rescue and devote attention to the wounded, a work that was practically as dangerous as actual fighting. Of this there can be no doubt, but it is specially well to put it upon record at this moment, when the ambulance is so near to our thoughts. Facilities for travel have become so much ex- tended of late years that international gather- ings, which once would have been impossible, are jnow comparatively common but there is, apparently, a limit even to these, for it is not likely that the Council of the British Associa- tion will accept the invitation it has just re- ceived from Ceylon for the Association to visit that island. As is being pointed out, the time required for the double journey would be an obstacle to the attendance of many members, so that nothing like a full meeting could be ex- pected, while the period of year at which the Association usually assembles is a further serious consideration in connection with a pro- posal for its going to a tropical clime. It is pleaded, in support of the idea, that this great scientific gathering has twice assembled in Canada but both in regard to the distance and the climate, Canada cannot be regarded as paralled with Ceylon, and the precedent of the Dominion, therefore, will pro- bably be pleaded in vain. As motor omnibuses are now running in at least one section of London and motor vans are on the increase in our streets, it would really seem at last as if this form of vehicular traffic had come to stay. In any case, the points are certain to be emphasised at next week's run" of the Motor- car Club from the Metropolis to Brighton, when the latest designs in motors of various shapes and sizes will be practically tested on the road. The main point for the lovers of the automobile Is that the practical part of the world, as apart from the pleasure-taking, is gradually becoming impressed with the new style of locomotion. There is not accustomed to be thought to be much sentiment about London vestrymen, but at this moment the Chelsea Vestry are inviting tenders for three motor-vans, while the St. George's (Hanover-square) Vestry is de- voting five hundred pounds to the purchase of an experimental motor dust-van. These are signs of the times which are not likely to be overlooked; and they are to be coupled with the fact, which can be noted in the London streets every day, that several large firms are now using steam or oil waggons as distributing agents. The motor movement, therefore, is on the increase, and it would be rash as yet to attempt to prophesy how far it will go. The hunting season for 1899-1900 has this week made a fair start, and visitors to more than one London terminus having direct con- nection with some favourite hunting county could not mistake the fact. It is said by ex- perts in such a matter that this season is likely to be remembered as one of the best in the cen- tary. The foxhound packs are declared to be as strong in numbers as in efficiency, while harriers and beagles not only show no signs of lessening popularity but seem to increase in numbers. One feature about the harriers and beagles is that five or six of the packs have ladies for masters," and the race of Diana the Huntress is obviously not yet extinct. There was a period, and that not so very great a time ago, when it appeared to be thought that hunting was a dying sport but there is no mistaking its liveliness now, and it promises long to continue to flourish in this sport-loving land. R.

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