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A ROYAL GAME BAG.

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THE NEGLECTED PORT OF LONDON.

THE KAISER AND THE CARICATURES.

A MOTOR WEDDING.

THE NORTH NATAL BATTLE. GROUND.

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THE NORTH NATAL BATTLE. GROUND. The bird's-eye sketch map published herewith shows roughly that part of North Natal where the principal battling of the war so far has taken plaoe. Sir George White's headquarters were at Lady- smith, and General Symons had his camp between Glencoe and Dundee. The distance from Ladysmith to Glencoe Junction by rail is about 42 milea. At Giencbe Junction a branch line of the railway runs to Dundee, a distance of about five and a half miles. The main line, which is shown traversing the map, proceeds northward over Laing's Nek into the Transvaal, passing through Newcastle, which is about 37 miles from Glencoe Junction. About two-thirds of the way from Newcastle to Glencoe Junction are Hatting Spruit and Hat. ting, and near Hatting, at Dannhauser (marked in the extreme north of the map), the Boer centre, under General Joubert. was established. The whole of the frontier between Natal and the Orange Free I State (which is to the left of the map) runs alongthe top of the Drakensberg hills. The numerous passes crossing the range have been for some time in the possession of the Free State Boers. The greater part of the frontier line between Natal and tbe Transvaal runs along the Buffalo River. A range of hills called the Biggarsberg range runs straight across from the Drakensbergs to Glencoe, and then takes a more southerly direction towards Rorke's Drift on the Buffalo River. From the Boer centre about Hatting a detachment moved rapidly to the right of the railway, and crossing the Biggarsberg Range came down Elandsiaagte, where it cut the rail- way and the telegraph with a view of destroying the communications between Sir George White and General Symons. Elandslaagte is about 15 miles by rail from Ladysnnth. From the Boer right, on the far side of the Buffalo River, an attack was concen- trated on Dundee, and was repulsed by General Symons in the actIon in which he was fatally wounded. In the meantime the Free State Boers were threaten- ing an attack upon Ladysmith, and had at one time advanced with their right on Besters Station, a station on the railway from Ladysmith to Harrismith (and to west or left of the territory covered by our little map), and their left on Acton, Homes, which lies to the south-west of Besters, near the Tugela River. But they retired, and General French, under the supervision of Sir George White. engaged the Boer forces at Elandslaagte, and utterly routed them. General Yule, who had succeedecl General Symons in command of the Glencoe detach- ment, had to expect the probable advance of tho main column of the Boer forces under General Joubert. He fell back to Waschbank, aoout- xteen miles to the south of Glencoe, where the Boers had in the meantime suc- ] ceeded in blowing up the railway bridge. Sir George Al hite advanced from Ladysmith along the road to Glencoe, and having encountered and defeated a detachment of Boers on the way. joined hands with General Yule, who then marched his force into the strong British camp at Ladysmith, there to await further eventualities. The camp was menaced by Free State Boers to the westward, and from the north by Joubert's main force. Tht. country between Laciysmith and the Tintwa, on the Orange Free State Border, is flat till it reaches the foot hills of the mountain range; and there is little cover on the veldt, the scrub being of the scan- tiest. Our map gives an idea of the mountainous and broken character of the country away to the north and east of Ladysmith. Job's Kop. by Sun- day's River, just south-east of Elandsiaagte, is 5694ft. high, and Mount Indumeni, in the Biggars- berg range, overlooking Wessel's Nek, and the rail- way at Waschbank, is 7200ft. high. Glencoe Hill, up which the British force made its grand charge in (I the first battle, rises steeply 1000ft.

jMOORISH INDUSTRIES .AT [GLASGOW.

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THE MAYDUE SCANDAL.

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THE INCREASE OF IRISH LUNACY.

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.MOSQUITOES AND MALARIA.