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MARRIAGE OF MAJOR H. W. GRIFFITHS,…

INTERESTING TO RAILWAY PASSENGERS.

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REVIEW OF THE BRITISH CORN…

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REVIEW OF THE BRITISH CORN TRADE. A few wheat fields in Kent and Sussex have fallen before the reaper, but the low temperature and sunless skies of the past week have arrested the natural advance of the season and made the harvest some days later than it would otherwise have been. The thunderstorms, which have been of disastrous violence in the south-eastern district and in the southern midlands, have not been ex- perienced in every part of the country, in fact, although the area of laid corn is large it is very local, and it is not an unfrequent sight in driving to see the fields on one side of the road badly lodged, and on the other still tall and upright. A fine hot week now would make harvest general, for a yellow tinge is on the corn, and in the Southern Counties has almost deepened into brown. That a fine hot week is coming does not, however, appear very likely, weather conditions being sadly uusettled, and the area of disturbance seem- ing to embrace the whole of North-Western Europe. That two currents, one hot and dry, the other cold and moist, are in unusually violent conflict seems clear by the experience of days like Friday, when ten hours of higher temperature and brighter weather brought up an evening's downpour of chilly rain. Owing to the want of bright sunshine since early in July the barley crop is again expected to be deticient in fine malting samples, though the Eastern Counties will not even in this respect be quite so unfortunate as they were last year. The season appears to have done no harm to beans or to oats, both of which are now good and promising crops. At the fag end of a cereal year, the sales of English wheat dwindle in importance, and prices, through scarcity, have a certain tendency to harden. During the past week 26 markets have been dearer, against 24 in the preceding week; 18 have been firm, against 17 and 4 weak, against 7. The tendency of trade, therefore, has been in sellers' favour, though no great activity is to be recorded. The wheat grains of this year's crop are better filled out and matured than those of last year, so that with even the most ordinary August we are likely to have new wheat deliveries of fair milling character before September is far advanced. In 1888 we had scarcely any deliveries of new corn until after Michaelmas. The imperial average for English wheat at 187 statute markets for the week ended July 27th, 1889, was 45,746 qrs., at 30s. per qr., as compared with 23,209 qrs., at 32s. 6d. per qr. on the corresponding week of last year. The trade in foreign wheat has been decidedly firm on the whole, but business on Friday and Saturday was less encouraging than on the Tuesday, Wednes- day, and Thursday. On Tuesday there were considerable sales of wheat at Liverpool at 5d. per qr. advance, and London on the Wed- nesday reported, at 6d. improvement, a rather lively market for the mid-week. Bristol on Thursday was Is. per qr. dearer, and so were Manchester and Birmingham. On Friday, however, the London buyers demurred to Wednesday's advance, Liverpool was steadier than London, but the sales at Tuesday's currencies were small. Russian, Californian and American red winter wheat have been the sorts most in request and about in order named. The remaining offers-Australasian, Chilian, and Indianâhave been less sought after, but holders have asked 6d. more money and obtained it where sales were made. The quantity of wheat on passage from India shows a considerable increase on the fortnight, and this fact probable accounts for the reluctance of buyers to pay more money for Indian at the same time that they are cheer- fully giving 6d. more money for certain other sorts. The stocks of breadstuffs no longer show any diminution within the United Kingdom, as imports equalling 371,326 qrs. have been supplemented by 115,047 qrs. of English corn, and the aggregate supply has been a few thousand quarters over the 480,000 qr. at which consumptive requirements are assumed. American stocks have fallen 76,000 qrs. in the week, and are now only 1,524,000 qrs., against 2,710.000 qrs. one year and 4,003,000 qrs. two years ago. The imports of breadstuff's into London for the week ended Friday last included 36,573 qrs. of foreign wheat (5,325 Calcutta, 1,013 Adriatic, 6,000 qrs. Baltic, and the rest from the Sea of Azov and Black Sea), which with 3,082 qrs. English, and flour equal to 58,922 qrs., made a total supply of breadstuff's equal to 98,577 qrs. The trade in spring corn has been the subject of a slight but general forward movement. Six markets have been dearer for barley, eight for oats, and 14 for maize, out of 24 leading exchanges The chief exchanges whereat more money has been obtainable for barley are Bristol, the chief barley market for foreign sorts, after London; Lynn, a leading centre on the east cost; Plymouth, Hereford, and Birmingham. London has been very weak. Oats have been dearer in London, Southampton, Wakefield, Manchester, Bristol, and Hereford, but the important Scottish exchanges have favoured buyers, and in Ireland oats can still be bought in quantity at 16s. per qr. Maize has been an exceptionally heavy importation, so that the slight price improvement indicates a real strength of tone. The country markets are stronger for pulse, and the big ports are dearer for rye. For linseed there is still a good inquiry at currencies, while the rape- seed is again rather higher, Ferozepore making 48s. 6d. per qr. Arrived wheat cargoes snow an improve- ment of 6d. per qr. on Californian and 3d. per qr. on Chilian. Other sorts show no price change but an improved inquiry at former quotations. Round maize is 8d. dearer on the week, and barley is held for the same im- provement on cargoes, notwithstanding the weakness of the trade at Mark Lane in landed grain and in smaller parcels. Rye is quite Is. dearer on the week, and oats are 6d. higher. The week's arrivals included four wheat, two maize, and one linseed cargo. The trade in cargoes on passages and for shipment has been rather active. Good sales of Russian winter wheat have been made at from 31s. 9d. to 32s. 9d. for shipments from the Sea Azov, at 34s. 6d. for shipment from Kertch, and at same price for Crimean. In American, new crop for red winter wheat for prompt shipment a fair trade has been done at 32s. 6d. per q r., while the new Californian crop is offered at 36s. 3d. with buyers at 36s. per qr. For mixed American maize only 19s. 3d. is still asked, but Galatz Foxanian at 20s. 9d. is 6d. dearer on the week, and Taganrog rye at 24s. is Is. 6d. higher. For cheap Russian oats, August shipment, 14s. 6d. is asked being 6d. improvement on the week. Barley quotations for prompt shipment include Smyrna 19s., and Taganrog 17s. per qr.âMark Lane Express.

LORD ROSEBERY AND THE COUNTY…

REVIEW OF THE FOREIGN CORN…

WELSH GIRLS' SCHOOL, ASHFORD.

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DR TANNER M.P., RETURNS TO…

THE ROYAL GRANTS.

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RAILWAY TIME TABLES—JULY.…

ORDERS & ADVERTISEMENTS RECEIVED…