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Utir fouirou Coruspoiitat.

THE END OF A POLISH PATRIOT.

HOW to DISPOSE of TWO MILLIONS!j

A DOMESTIC TRAGEDY IN CUMBER-LAND.

FRIGHTENED TO DEATH BY A ,GHOST!

THE LANCASHIRE DISTRESS.

THE MURDER NEAR LEOMINSTER.

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THE MURDER NEAR LEOMINSTER. An inquest was held at the Leominster Union Work- house on Friday, on the body of Mary Ann Watkins, who was found murdered on Monday night under circumstances which our readers are doubtlessly well acquainted with The accused husband was present In custody during the inquest David Lipscombe said As I was going home about 10 o'clock I heard a very strange sound as I was pass- ing through an orchard. It was a moaning noise, and seemed to be the other side of the hedge. It ceased for a time, and I stood still thn I heard it more dis- tinctly, and I went in the direction of the noise, through a gate in the fence. I there saw a woman lying on her face, near the path. I went close to her, and found she was covered with blood, and could not breathe freely. I put her head on her arm so that she might breathe more freely, and then went and called up Mr. Lane, at Strawberry Cottage, about 400 yards distant, who returned with me to the body with a lantern on our way he said he suspected it was Mary Ann Watkins, and holding the light to her face, he said, "Yes, it is." Lane then went to deceased's lodgings and told George Smith, the ten- ant of the house, about her. He said he had often guarded the deceased home, as he feared that her husband might kill her. James Lane, a gardener in the employ of Captain Stevenson at Strawberry Cottage, gave confirmatory evidence. He said that the deceased had told him that her husband had threatened to take her life, because she would not live with him, and that her reason for not living with him was that he would not work to earn a livelihood. The prisoner said he wanted to know how the last witness knew he was going to kill his wife The coroner replied that the witness had not said that he did know it. George Smith deposed that the deceased lodged at his house, and had one room upstairs and one down. She had three children. Her husband often came to see her, and they sometimes quarrelled, but he had never known them to come to blows. He had heard the prisoner say he would be the death of her and of two others, by whom he understood prisoner to mean the two children. She had often said she did not like being out at night for fear he should attack her. On the Friday before the murder, when he last saw the prisoner, he noticed he had on a pair of patent clogs, round-toed, and tipped with iron. On the day fol- lowing the murder he traced clog-marks from near the body to a considerable distance. Thomas Jones, a mason, said that the prisoner called at his lodgings nhout 10 o'clock on Monday night, and begged a pipe of tobacco, which he smoked there. The prisoner talked about his wife and seemed much con- fused and put about. When he was leaving he said, 11 Good night, Tom Perhaps I shall never see you any more. I have a mind to go and drown myself." Superintendent Alexander, of the borough police, said, after attending to the deceased at the workhouse, he went to the spot where the body was found, and there saw certain clog-marks. Suspicion fell on the prisoner, and he tracked these marks for several miles. He found the deceased's bonnet, the strings of which appeared to have been torn off, and also her hair net. After following the clog-tracks about the fields for thne days, he came upon the prisoner at Hayen, six miles from Leominster, talking to a.farmer's wife at her.door, where he had gone begging. He had just told her that he had heard that the man who had committed the murder had drowned-ftimself. His clogs corresponded exactly with the cleg-marks near the body, and he had several spots of blood on his trousers. Eugene Goddard, surgeon, described the wounds the deceased had received. He had made a posl-vwrlem examination, and had no doubt whatever that the wounds he had described were the cause of death. They appeared to have been inflicted with some blunt instru- ment. A kick from a clog like those produced would probably do it. Mr. Chattaway, another surgeon, and other witnesses gave corroborative evidence. The coroner summed up, and the j ury returned a verdict of "Wilful murder" against Thomas Watkins.

A VIOLENT LOVER IN CAMBRIDGE.

A REAL BIT OF ROMANCE!

A VOYAGE OF DISCOVERY.

LAYING CLAIM TO AN ESTATE.

AN ILLUSTRIOUS VISITOR!

EXTRAORDINARY SCENE at a SALE!

A ROMANCE IN LOW LIFE. '

THE GREAT DIVORCE CASE! •I

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