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FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE.

THE JAPANESE DIFFICULTY.

"THE OVERLAND MAIL.

THE WAR IN NEW ZEALAND.

I UtisHlIantotts tdligtnte.

EPITOME OF NEWS.

THE MARKETS.

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THE MARKETS. MARK LANE, MONDAY. Fresh up to Mark-lane to-day the arrivals of wheat both from Essex and Kent were very moderate, but the condition of the produce was for the most part good. The circum- stance that large quantities of foreign, chiefly Dantzic, wheat have recently gone direct to the millers, combined with the sudden change of the weathe r, produced a slow sale for all kinds of English wheat. Most transactions were at the rates current on Monday last; but factors would have been compelled to accept less money in some instances had they shown any disposition to force sales. The supply of foreign wheat on the stands was by no means extensive. In all de- scriptions, a limited business was transacted. Holders were, however, firm, add no change took place in price, com- pared with this day se'nnight. There was less activity in the demand for cargoes of grain afloat. Wheat, how- ever, supported the advance of Is to 2s per quarter realised during the latter part of last week. With barley the market was less extensively supplied. Good and fihe malting qualities ruled firm, at quite previous cur- rencies. In other descriptions, sales progressed slowly, yet no change took place in the currencies. Malt changed hands to a moderate extent at late rates. The supply of oats on sale was very large. For most qualities there was, however, a fair average inquiry, and all good and fine pro- duce steadily supported previous quotations. The supply of beans on sale was tolerably large. On the whole the trade ruled steady, at last Monday's currency. The supply of peas, which was but moderate, were steady in price, and all qualities were in moderate request The supply of barrel flour on offer was small, and previous quotations were well supported. Country marks, as well as French and Spanish qualities, were in fair average demand, at full currencies. METROPOLITAN CATTLE MARKET, MONDAY. For the time of year the supply of foreign stock on offer in to-day's market was tolerably good. Sales progressed slowly, at depressed currencies. The arrivals of beasts fresh up from oun grazing districts, as well as from Scetland, were on the increase, and their general quality was prime. The beef trade was inactive at, compared with Thursday, a decline in the quotations of 4d per 81b. Compared with Monday last, the fall was 2d per 81b. The top figure for the best Scots and crosses was 5s per 81b. Although the show of sheep was only moderate, the mutton trade, owing to large arrivals of meat up to Newgate and Xeadenhall, was somewhat heavy. Prime small Downs changed hands on rather lower terms, and all heavy breeds of sheep gave way fully 2d per 8lb. The extreme value of Downs was 6s. per SIb. Calves met a slow sale; nevertheless, prim e veal was 2d per 81b dearer than Monday last. The pork trade was heavy, and prices were not supported. HOPS. We have to report a good demand for all kinds of hops, both English and foreign, at our quotations. The supplies on offer are very moderate. Last week's import amounted to 106 bales from Boulogne, 162; from Antwerp, 57 from Ostend, 97 from Dunkirk, 41 from Haniburg, 93 from Bremen, and 6 from Calais. Mid and East Kents, 105s to 1908; Weald of Kents, 100s to 135s; Sussex, 105s to 120s Bavarian, 105s to 168s Belgian, 70s to 7 8s; American, 105s to 126s per cwt. POTATOES. The arrivals of potatoes by water carriage have fallen off: but the receipts by railway have been moderately large. In nearly all descriptions a fair average business is doing, and prices rule firm. Yorkshire Regents, 80s to 90s ditto Flukes. 95s to 110s; ditto Rocks, 60s to 70s Scotch Regents, 55s to 80s; ditto Rocks, 50s to 60s; Kent and Essex Regents, 60s to 80s per ton. WOOL. Although business in home-grown wool has not materially increased since we last wrote, rather more firmness has been apparent in the trade, and previous quotations have been well supported. In colonial wool, by private contract, the transactions have been far from numerous, but at full prices. There were no imports into London last week.