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WELCOME, LITTLE PRINCELY STRANGER!

,. MAY HEAVEN BEFRIEND IT…

__-----THE QUEEN'S AiifclVAL.…

WHY SIR GEORGE GREY RESPITED…

REMOVAL OF TOWNLEY. ; :

EXECUTION OF WRIGHT.;

[No title]

FRAUD BY AN ACTUARY.

MR. HOME, THE SPIRIT MEDIUM,…

THE INTENDED ASSASSINATION…

---------------- -.A PARALLEL!

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A PARALLEL! A gentleman writing to the Times draws the following parallel betwixt Bill Sykes in "Oliver l'wist," and Townley:â As cold-blooded and brutal a murder as was ever, perhaps, committed having been followed by the respite of the murderer on the ground of insanity, it ia not surprising that the public, feeling that deep interests are at stake, wish to th oroughly sift the reasons and the justice which have led to the preserva- tion of the deliberately forfeited life of Townley the murderer. But public interest appears to be universally excited in this case by the suspicion that the equality of justice has not been preserved between rich and poor. If we take the case of Townley the murderer on the one hand, and that, of Sill Sykes the murderer on the other, and compare them calmly, we may arrive at a conclusion whether this suspicion and distrust has been reasonably or unreasonably excited. Townley, passionately in love with his victim, finding that she has played him false, seeks an inter* view, the object of which is clear. If the poor girl had acceded to his wish and con- sented to become his wife, her life would have been saved, but she refused, and he kills her deliberately and brutally. Bill Sykes, equally, after his manner, enamoured of I his sweetheart, proposes a certain ultimatum to her, which she declines to accept, and consequently meets .¡ with the same fate. Townley, superior in social position to Sykes, has plenty of friends, who come forward apd state that his behaviour has been eccentric all his life, and that several of his relations have been rather odd. The result is, the preservation of his. deliberately forfeited life, and that he ill to live-iii a madhouse certainly, but still to liveâfor, probably, very inanr years, in a condition which the recent insight whicn we have obtained into the treatment of criminals forbids us to believe will be one of serious discomfort. Poor Sykes, unfriended by parson or doctor, within three weeks merely represents something put out of sight withm the precincts of the prison. Yet both these men were actuated by the same motive,â Lust, through some certain strainers well refted, Is gentle lore. And it is difficult to discern much difference, making due allowance for the difference in the education of the two criminals, between the ultimatum presented to Townley's victim, and, I will say, that of the Fording- bridge murderer's. Townley went with a deliberate motive, and failing in his object, committed a brutat murder. I would only quote, in justification of the universal feeling, of dissatisfaction which is now evinced by the publio at the respite of Townley the very words of the Under- Secretary of State while declining to extend the pre- rogative of mercy to the criminal right:- It is one of those sad cases, unfortunately too frequent, where human life is taken under the Influence ofungoverned passions, but with a full Intention at the time, as evidenced by the use of a deadly weapon, and the natnre of the injury r inflicted, to take life, and without such provocation m could reduce the crime to manslaughter. If we have done wrong in respiting Townley, as we seem to think we have, ehall. we set matters tiarhi hv stretching severity to its utmost extent in the case of Wright, whose crime, very many have suggested, was difficult to consider more than manslaughter ? A mistake haa been made. Let us try not to make it again, but not to atone for it by displaying unwonted strength of mind in its correction.

A NBW MILITARY FOUNDER!