Hide Articles List

13 articles on this Page

REVIEW OF THE YEAR 1863.

i EXECUTION of a WOMAN-DREADFUL…

GARIBALDI AND VICTOR HUGO.

A MAN WITHOUT A COUNTRY.

A SAD CHRISTMAS.

* MAKING THE BEST OF IT.

THE RANK OF SERGEANT-COOK…

TWO HISTORICAL PARALLELS.

News
Cite
Share

TWO HISTORICAL PARALLELS. .t_ Louis Ponce de Leon, the monk, theologian, and poet, was arrested one morning after his usual lecture in the far-famed University of Salamanca in the autumn of 1572, and brought before the Inquisition of Valladolid (writes the Tinted Paris correspondent). The crime he was charged with was having made, at the request of a friend unacquainted with the Oriental languages, a version of the Song of Solomon," with a commentary explaining its character and purposes. His work had nothing in it profane or scoffing, or that any one could object to. Louis de Leon was of the order of St. Augustine, and was one of the most orthodox among the ortho- dox but the Inquisition thought they discovered in his manuscript, which had been copied by a trea- cherous servant, traces of Lutheranism. The Luther- anism was imaginary and tould not be sustained but to .the charge of having made a translation into the vernacular, contrary to a decree of the Council of Trent, he had little or no defence. The Spanish monk, who certainly was no Protestant, repudiated ener- getically the imputation of Lutheranism and as for the translation, he simply pleaded that he had made it for a friend, out of whose hand he never meant it to pass; that it had never been published nor intended to be published. He was left to languish for five years in the prison of Valladolid; his health was im- paired, and his spirits almost broken and it might have gone still harder with him but for the interven- tion of a powerful friend. That intervention was so useful that not only was he released, but was allowed to return to Salamanca, and to resume the chair of St. Thomas Aquinas in his beloved University. Louis de Leon was venerated by the students and the people. The day on which he was to appear, the lecture-room was crowded to excess not only from a desire to see him in the old familiar place, but from curiosity to hear him denounce his oppressors and de- scribe the unjust and undeserved treatment he had met with. When the assembly beheld that form bowed by suffering, that countenance pale and emaci- ated from illness, and the eye which the cells of Val- ladolid had not quite dimmed, a murmur of delight ran round the hall, and all rose to greet him. Not one but expected that he would at once enter upon the tale of his wrongs but they were disappointed. Louis de Leon gently raised his hand, looked calmly around, and in the midst of the deepest silence, began-" My friends, as I remarked, when we last met here;" and continued his lecture on the same subject as when he had last appeared before them, with no allusion what- ever to his imprisonment, as if it had been a blank and had left not the slightest trace on his memory. Among those who thronged the hall and the gallery of the Legislative Chamber in Paris, on Thursday last, there were many who were there from curiosity to hear M. Thiers, and who hoped or feared that he would yield to the temptation of alluding, however indirectly, to the morning when he was arrested, im- prisoned, and expelled the country, while the man, then Minister of the Interior, by whose orders it was done, was the same who now presides in the Chamber to which M. Thiers has been elected, after an absence of twelve years. If there were any such, they were as much disappointed as the students of Salamanca. M. Thiers stood up to speak with the same calm as if that long period of enforced silence had really no existence, and as if it were but yesterday, instead of twelve long years ago, he had stood in a place where he once reigned all but supreme. The subject was one with which he is well acquainted, and had but an indirect relation to politics. The moderation of M. Thiers's speech was remarked by every one. He spoke with great self-command and caution; he provoked no recrimination, and he scrupulously avoided anything which would excite the u le passions or prejudices of any party. It is reported that the Emperor expresses himself much pleased with the speech. He, too, perhaps, is agreeably dis- appointed at the absence of delicate topics but if he really is so satisfied as people say, he must now feel how mistaken his ex-Minister, M. de Persigny, was in combating with so much violence and denouncing as an enemy to the country the man who has just shown that he can, even on such questions, delight, if not completely convince a public assembly.

THE DEATH OF MR. THACKERAY.

A JEWISH BREACH OF PROMISE.

: THE COST OF THE AMERICAN…

[No title]

THE MARKETS.