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REVIEW OF THE YEAR 1863.

i EXECUTION of a WOMAN-DREADFUL…

GARIBALDI AND VICTOR HUGO.

A MAN WITHOUT A COUNTRY.

A SAD CHRISTMAS.

* MAKING THE BEST OF IT.

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MAKING THE BEST OF IT. "In the Court of Common Pleas, last week, a cause, "Langan v. Hughes," was tried, and was an action for breach of promise of marriage against a major-general. In opening the pleadings it was stated that the plaintiff was Miss Frances Georgiana Langan, the defendant was James Victor Hughes. The plaintiff was a lady of good birth, and she sued the defendant, a major-general in the army, but now retired, in consequence of a breach by him of an engagement entered into many years ago, and renewed from time to time, to marry her. The only plea being a denial of the engagement, if it had become necessary for him, which he was happy to say it was not, he should have shown the jury by a correspondence extending over years and years that the promise had been made and Renewed and he should also have shown them that Major-General Hughes had now put it out of his power to perform his_ promise to Miss Langan, inas- much as he had married another lady. This being so, and the breach not being justified in any way, the only possible question would be the amount of damages. He had, therefore, conferred with his learned friend who appeared for the defendant, and had arranged the amount of damages to be paid and the only duty of the jury would be to give a verdict in accordance with that arrangement. Mr. Coleridge said that through the candour of his learned friend he had had an opportunity of seeing the letters of Major-General Hughes and after having seen them, he felt that it would be idle to take up the time of the jury with the question whether a promise to marry had been made, for the letters showed abund- antly conclusive to his mind that such a promise had been made and therefore the only question was one of damages for having broken a promise very solemnly entered into. Under these circumstances he had agreed, on the part of Major-General Hughes, to give substantial damages. He was bound also to say that having heard from his learned friend that there was a letter in which Miss Langan thought that Major- General Hughes made some reflection upon her, he wished to say that there was no intention to cast the smallest imputation of any kind, and that if there re- mained any suspicion that there was an imputation, Major-General Hughes, through him, withdrew it. In conclusion, he had simply to say that Major-General Hughes, like many other people, had changed his mind, and must pay for it; and the jpry would find a verdict for the plaintiff, damages 10WI.-Ver(lict accordingly.

THE RANK OF SERGEANT-COOK…

TWO HISTORICAL PARALLELS.

THE DEATH OF MR. THACKERAY.

A JEWISH BREACH OF PROMISE.

: THE COST OF THE AMERICAN…

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THE MARKETS.