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THURSDAY, OCTOBER S, 1896.…

---.---ALCOHOLIC TEMPERANCE…

COPYING THE GREAT WHEEL.

--MISTAKING A PHEASANT FOR…

THE NEW HALL FOR CARDIFF.

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Family Notices

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------------------THE POSITION…

CARDIFF CORPORATION OFFICIALS.

A TOBACCO MANUFACTORY FOR…

TECHNICAL INSTRUCTION-AT CARDIFF.

■„ DEPRESSED AGRICULTURE.

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WAGES QUESTION.

SITUATION AT LLANELLY.

PROPOSED TRAMWAY FOR BARRY.

WALES IN LONDON.

ROYALTY AT NORWICH.

------------__.-------SOUTH…

FREE LABOUR ASSOCIATION,

THE CHURCH CONGRESS.

THE CBADDOCK WELLS ICKDOWMENT.…

DAMAGING SHRUBS AND TREKS.

j A LOVING CUP FOR CARDIFF.

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-.--LORD KENSINGTONI DEAD.…

BOARD OF TRADE RETURNS.

WAGES AGITATION IN THE ENGINEERING…

AT FIRE AT LLANELLY.

SOUTH WALES UNIVERSITY COLLEGE…

[No title]

ARCHDEACON GRIFFITHS.

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ARCHDEACON GRIFFITHS. The marks of time increase, reveal the ace-- The sere, autumnal period of decline, When rest is needed, and when men recline, Yet in his heartâwhere no wild passions rage- There is a fire which nothing can assuage. It kindles love for man, shows every sigh Of patriotism. Into strains superbly fine It breaks, Welsh eloquenoe divinely sage. The drowsiest audience he can keep awake, So lively is the soul that dwells in him. So grand the flow of speech to the brim Doth fill and satisfy. When we partake Of his rich thoughts we have a glorious feast, And for another long wheu it has ceased. SILURIAN. The old people in tha Fro were much given to writing epitaphs. The following is one which was composed by a wag on the death of ft noted Old character in the neighbourhood :â Yma. gorwedd Mart salw Dan y gareg hon yn farw Os car hi'r bedd fel carodd hi'r gwely Hi fydd ddiwedda'n adgyfodi. (Here are buried beneath these stones Poor old Mary's tired bones If she loves the vrave as she loved her bed, She will be the last of the risen dead). Mary was evidently a near relation of the old lady whose epitaph reads Weep not tor me, friends, though death do us sever, for I'm going to do nothing for ever and ever." Mr Hughes, the agent of Sir Wm. Harcourt in West Monmoubh, has won general encomiums for the arrangements made with regard to the recent meetings, and particularly for the wise course adopted in putting up the distinguished speaker early in the evening, and thus enabling telegrapbio reports of his speech, which had to be sent to all parts of the United Kingdom, to be gob away in something like reasonable time. All others who have to arrange meetings of this class might well take a hint from Mr Hughes in this respeot. Sir Wm. Harcourt was to have driven over the mountain from Ebbw Vale to Rhymney on Tuesday, but wind and rain dashed so violently over the heights that he had to engage a special train for his party. This is the second special train Sir William has had on this visit, for on Monday the Portsmouth train, having arrived at Newport too late to make the connection with the valley train, the G.W.R. authorities courteously ran up a special for the Liberal leader's convenience. There were terrible times at Ebbw Vale on Monday night, especially for reporters and telegraphists, for all the beds in the place had been taken, and in the pouriug rain visitors had to wander around for shelter, It is said that ten unfortunates had one billiard table between them, but this is an exaggeration. It is, however, a fact that at half-past 12 one hotel keeper had ten applicants for room. By dint of placing two in a bed, and using up all sofas aud couches, the billiard-room occupants were reduced to four. Nor was even this the worst. Feeding time at Ebbw Vale was not exactly a fight for food, but when it comes to 15 hungry men trying to satisfy tbeir appetite in a room 12 feet by 9, matters are a little jammed, even when the table is left out of account, and the table was a very impor- tant item just then. Why the Post Office authorities should not provide in advance for the accommodation of their emissaries is a mystery. For the Pressmen, of course, there need be no sympathyâthey always take care of themselves, and deserve what tbey get, even if they don't always get what they deserve. N.B.âIt was not the Pressmen who oame out at the wrong end of this tussle. The old legend of Dwynwen, the Celtic Venus, Is not generally known, though it is one of the most interesting stories of love and Wales. Maelon Dafodrill, a Welsh Prince, fell in love with Dwynwen, one of the beautiful daughters of Brychan Bryoheiniog. The love was mutual, but the stern parent had already arranged a marriage between his daughter and another Prince, and Maelon's proposal was rejected. This angered Maelon Dafodrill, who left his lady-love, and in bitterness of soul aspersed her. Dwynwen was so distressed that she went to a lonely woodland and there prayed that God would cure her of love. after which she fell asleep. In her sleep an angel administered a delicious tion to ber which quite fulfilled her wishes. But in a dream Dwynwen observed thab the same liquid administered to Maelon Dafodrill oaused him to be transformed or frozen to a block of ice. The angel then desired her to express three wishes, and the first was thatiMaelon should be unfrozen, which after all proved that she still had a place in her heart for the old love. The second wish of Dwynwen was that her snpplica. tions in favour of all true lovers, who should either obtain the object of their affection or be cured 'of love. Thirdly, thab she should never wish to be married. The three wishes were granted, and Dwynwen henceforth devoted herself to a religious life. From that time faithful lovers who invoked her were either cured of love or obtained the objeot of his or her affection. In the North the shrine of Dwynwen was at the churoh of Llandwynwen, in Mona, and her com- memoration occurred on the 25th of January. In the South the bards regarded ber sbrine to be r the Tresillian Cave.

NEWS IN BRIEF.

LIVERPOOL'S COMMERCE.

..A-LOCKED IN SCHOOL ALL NIGHT.