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THE MARRIAGE TIE.

ENTITLED TO TENBY'S CONFIDENCE.

ANCIENT COAL WORKINGS

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PICTURESQUE VISITORS.

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PICTURESQUE VISITORS. 8 BRETONS IN PEMBROKESHIRE. The first cargo of Breton onions (writes a correspondent) has arrived at Haverfordwest, and already the visitors have penetrated to the remotest village and hamlet in Pembrokeshire. Picturesquely attired in smock frocks, the men and lads leave Haverfordwest every morning shortly after daybreak, and the clatter of vehicles and the tramp of heavy footsteps resound through the empty streets, to the accompaniment of merry voices speaking a language to which Pembrokeshire folk have grown accustomed. Although there are many privations, and sometimes men and lads have to walk many miles in a scorching sun laden with "hanks" of onions, they thoroughly enjoy these annual trips. The sun burnt faces of the Bretons indicate robust health, and they are able to cover enormous distances daily on foot. They are hard-working and industrious, and most of them are peasant proprietors who by dint of much saving are fairly well provided for the future. Each evening the crew settle" with the master, the work of keeping the accounts being generally undertaken by the landlord of a local inn. The boys, whose rosy cheeks, kindly eyes, and deferential manners, make them welcome callers at many a farm homestead and country cottage, learn to speak English fairly well. At least, they acquire enough of the language to enable them to drive excellent bar- gains. Owing to the partial failure of the winter crop in Brittany, the price of French onions this year shows an upward tendency, and up to the present the supplies are much below the average. Of recent years the Breton visitors, probably under the smiling sun of prosperity, have shown a disposition to dispense with some of their more clumsy accoutrements. The majority of them now wearing ordinary boots instead-of the heavy clogs hewn out of a block of wood, which blister feet and cause needless perspiration. On Sundays the visitors are astir at the usual early hour, and it is an interesting sight to see them, dressed in their best clothes, and gathered in groups, on the Old Quay, with the winding river at their feet, and near by the ivy-clad ruins of the church of St. Thomas of Canterbury. Here they remain until the church bells announce the hour of morning service.

.103 YEARS OLD. -

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| TENBY TIDE TABLE. SEPT.,…

! RAILWAY TIME TABLE. JULY,…

FISHING TRADE BOOM AT MILFORD…

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LIST OF VISITORS.I