ARRIVAL OF CAPTAIN CAREY.—HIS STORY OF THE PRINCE'S DEATH.|1879-08-23|Pontypool Free Press and Herald of the Hills - Welsh Newspapers Online
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ABERSYCHAN LOCAL BOARD.

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LLANFRECHFA UPPER LOCAL BOARD.

ARRIVAL OF CAPTAIN CAREY.—HIS…

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ARRIVAL OF CAPTAIN CAREY.âHIS STORY OF THE PRINCE'S DEATH. The Jumna troopship arrived at Plymouth on Wednesday. The Daily Chronicled reporter imme- diately went on board and thus describes his interview with Captain Carey: "On boarding the Jumna I found Carey, looking well and in good spirits, and although his uniform betokened that he was a pri- soner, yet the arrest is merely nominal. Notwith- standing this, however, he was unable to land, which he was desirous of doing, in the hope of teeing his father, who still awaits him at Portsmouth. When told of the address of sympathy that had been pre- pared at Plymouth for presentation to him, he ex- pressed himself as highly pleased, all the' more so because it came from his own countrymen. With regard to the death of the Prince Imperial he said: âLord Chelmsford sent me out to choose the line of advance for the army, and, after several hits, I chose one road which in my opinion was the best for the purpose. When I reported the result of my survey of the country, he said, I want you to make a map of it, so that I may send it home to the Horse Guards.' Everything that was decided upon, went home. The day before that I had ridden out within two miles of the kraal which lay in front of us, accom- panied by Colonel Buller, and when I told him of the road I had chosen, he laughed at my choice, told me there was a donga thirty feet wide lying across it. I told him I did not think he was right; but his statement worried me. Upon returning to camp Colonel Harrison, the Quartermaster General, said to me, The Prince is going out to-morrow over your road to make a morl) detailed report, and to choose a camping ground, and you had better stop at home and finish your map.' I replied, < Well, to- morrow we shall be advancing, and I shall not .be able to touch the map. Do you mind my going out with the Prince, because I want to go over the ground again to verify a certain point I am not quite sure about ?' He said at first, No, you had better stop at home and do your map,' but afterwards ho said, 4 Very well, you may go.' Since then, and especially at the court-martial, Colonel Harrison has said that to the best of his belief what he said was this, 41 am glad you are going, because you can look after the Prince.' To the best of my belief, however, he never said anything of the kind. Even if he had, I contend that that in no sense gave me the command of the party, nor was there any reason to suppose that I was undertaking any such duty. Colonel Harri- son was simply directing me as the elder officer to keep my eye upon the Prince, in order to see that he did not do anything rash. At all events, that was how I should have interpreted any remark of the kind, supposing it to have been made; but as well as I recollect and to the best of my behalf, nothing of the kind ever passed. Next morning I went to the Prince, and asked him when he was going to start. He replied, 4 About half-past eight' but I did not see anything of the escort, and I then went to Colonel Harrison and found that the escort had not been warned; it was simply in order to save the Prince the trouble that I undertook to ferret out an escort, which I got together. The Prince gave every word of command. I at no time interfered with him, and did not consider I should have been justified in doing so. The Prince was doing a particular duty, and I merely accom- panied him for the purpose of obtaining for myself the protection of his escort. It was impossible for me to have been on duty, as I had no instructions. I never went out on duty without having from Colonel Harrison fully-written instructions and the fict of my not having any instructions on this occasion, is, I hold, conclusive proof that I was not in charge of the escort, and I was not on duty. I was simply acting for my own convenience, and gaining the necessary information for completing the map. There were heaps of staff officers from whom to select somebody to accompany the Prince if it had been required, and for me to have gone with him would have been a mere waste of time.' With regard to the Court-Martial, Captain Carey stated, in answer to questions, that he did not know the real finding and sentence of the Court, and he ridiculed the idea that it was death. At the very worst, the Court could only reprimand him for not not going back to assist the Prince when the attack was made, but he defends his conduct by asserting that, in the stampede that ensued it was impossible to rally owing to the horses being so terri- fied, and even if they had, the result could only have been the slaughter of the entire party.

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