PIIILANTHROPIC SOCIETY.|1879-08-16|Pontypool Free Press and Herald of the Hills - Welsh Newspapers Online
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LIEUTENANT CAREY. -

MEETING of TIN-PLATE WORKERS

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-----THE LONDON AND PROVINCIAL…

DEAN STANLEY AT LLANDAFF CATHEDRAL.

PIIILANTHROPIC SOCIETY.

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PIIILANTHROPIC SOCIETY. At the Winning Horse Hotel, on Tuesday even- ing, the annual dinner of the Good Intent (Pontypool) Lodge of the Merthyr Unity of Philanthropists was held. A repast served in Host Jeremiah's usual good style was proyided, and ample justice done to it. After the cloth was drawn, the chair was taken by Bro. W. Williams, P.P.G.M., and the vice-chair by Bro. J. Cook, Secretary to the Lodge. The harmony was sup- plied by Mr Pearce, harpist, in his customary able manner. The Chairman, in proposing the toast of The Queen," said it would be a piece of ingratitude if the health of Her Majesty was not cordially drunk by every assembly of British people before they entered upon other matters. The Queen had always been ready to support charitable institu- tions, and Her Majesty was j astly looked upon as a philanthropist. (Cheers.) The Prince and Princess of Wales and the rest of the Royal Family" was next given by the Chairman, who remarked that the Prince had en- deared himself to the nation by the active interest he displayed in everything which pertained to the good of the country, and the sympathy he always manifested in charitable societies. When- ever he came to rule the country, they had every assurance that he would do so with honour and dignity. (Cheers.) The Chairman gave the Bishop and Clergy of the Diocese and Ministers of all Denominations." Lieut. Green responded to the toast of The Army, Navy, and Reserve Forces." He thanked them for the cordial manner in which they had received the toast with which they had so hon- ourably associated his name. If the reserve forces were connected with the standing army of the country, he felt sure that in action as well as in conduct they would be found a worthy and cre- ditable adjunct. (Cheers.) The country was under no small obligations to the volunteers, who so readily devoted their time and their energies in perfecting themselves in military matters, that they might be prepared in time of need to come forward in the defence of our national honour. (Applause.) If ever called upon, he felt sure the volunteers would acquit themselves equally as well as the army. Bro. E. Thomas proposed The Coal, Iron, and other Trades generally of the District." The Chairman responded, and said it was hardly a pleasant topic to speak upon at the present time. Everyone was more.or less suffering from the de- pression of trade. The tide ebbed and flowed, and when the flow took place, which he hoped it speedily would do, they might hope for better times. He thought the wisest thing to do was to say as little as possible that evening, and look at the bright side of things. He trusted that the dawn was not far distant when the cloud would be dispersed which overspreaded their commercial activity, and that a revival of trade was at hand. (Hear, hear.) "The Press" was given by the Chairman in complimentary terms, and responded to by our representative. Bro. E. Thomas proposed The Unity," to which The Chairman replied. He remarked that if they were somewhat diminished in numbers, their intentions were not altered. They now consisted of about 13,000 members, and hitherto had been able to meet all claims and reserve a satisfactory balance in hand. (Cheers.) They were fighting against sickness, distress, and death, and he thought no one would deny that it was an hon- ourable warfare. If they took a retrospective view of the working of the society, they would see that it had accomplished great results, and in the face of every difficulty had been enabled to hold up its head. (Hear, hear.) They were still progressing, and the cry of the Philanthropists was Forward." The Vice-Chairman gave The Pontypool Dis- trict of Philanthropists." Bro. D. Williams, treasurer, responded. He had been in the Order many years, and was glad to meet them under such favourable circum- stances during the hard times they were now ex- periencing. They had paid all demands, and were still in a flourishing condition, having triumphed over all their difficulties. (Cheers.) He regretted the intended departure of their Bro. John Williams to a distant colony, and felt sure that he would carry with him the respect and esteem of all classes. (Applause.) Bro. S. Tovey gave The Good Intent Lodge," and wished it God speed." Bro. J. Williams responded. He observed that he was proud to be associated with such a lodge. They had suffered severely from depression of trade and sickness in the district, but they had been able to meet all demands, and the lodge re- mained in a satisfactory state. (Cheers.) The Chairman next proposed The Past and Present Officers," to which Bro. Tanner responded. The Visitors" was responded to by Mr Ed- wards, and The Host and Hostess" and The Ladies" concluded the toast list. The remainder of the evening was spent in an enjoyable manner.

SIR GARNET WOLSELEY'S AMERICAN…

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TURNING THE TABLES.

MARRIED BEFORE HE KNEW IT.

SNOW SKATES.

MOTHER WIT.

WAR.

I THE WORLD WOULD BE THE BETTER…

[ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.]

ICHAPTER XIII.

'THE REPRESENTATION OF MONMOUTH-ISHIRE.

AN INTERESTING NUMBER.

A JAPANESE PRISON.

THACKERAY'S HABITS AND PERSONAL…

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