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A HARD CASE. --

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A HARD CASE. In the Court of Queen's Bench, "ex parte Walker in a matter of the Mayor and Corporation of London," has been brought forward, and was an application which bad arisen out of the great burglary and robbery of watches andjewthy nt the shop of Mr. Walker, on Cornhill, in the night between Saturday, the 4th, and Monday, the 6th, f February, 1805. On that oceasioll 383 watches and a number of gold chains were stolen. The burglars were apprehended, triad, and convicted, and in the box of one of them 54 watches and chains were found, and in the box of another of them, named Casely, a sum of £2íO was found in rotes and money, which he stated was the produce of the robbery. On the 12th of April the burglars were tried and con- victed, and Mr. Walker applied to the Recorder for the restitution of the property and the money the proceeds of the property stolen. The Recorder, how- ever, declined to make the order, and referred the pro- secutor to the Treasury. The police, however, had handed over the money and the property to the city authorities, and to them the prosecutor accordingly addressed himself. In October, 1865, Mr. Walker petitioned the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Common Council, and was invited to attend ameetingof the Law, Parliamentary, and City Lands Committee, and he ac- cordingly attended but no conclusion was come to. Vari- ous other meetings and discussions had been held, but still no conclusion was come to until, at last, in 1867, the Court of Common Council cancelled the reference of the matter to the committee, and in the result Mr. Walker had received no part of his property. It ap- peared that the Corporation had actually been advised that, under certain ancient charters, giving them the right to felons' goods," they were entitled to retain the property of Mr. Walker, and this notwithstanding the enactments on the subject in favour of the right to restitution, ending with the very recent enactment in the statute 24th and 25th of Victoria, cap. 96, sec. 100. Sir J. D. Coleridge, Solicitor-General, now moved on behalf of Mr. Walker for a, writ of restitution directed to the Mayor and Corporation of London, directing them to return to him the property and pro- ceeds of the property of his which had been recovered from the burglars. There had been, he said, a long course of discussions and communications, which had led to no resultâexcept this, indeed, that Mr. Walker could not get back his property. The Corporation had somehow been led to take up the strange notion that they were entitled to this property as felons' goods," although it had never ceased to be his, and the robbers had been prosecuted to conviction, so that by the common law and the statutes he was clearly entitled to it. The property had never become the property of the robbers it remained the property uf the true owner who had been robbed, and the recent statute contained an express provision on the subject that restitution should be made. The Court without any hesitation granted a rule nisi for writ of restitution.

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