"THE MOTHS OF THE BRITISH ISLES" !|1907-12-18|The Chester Courant and Advertiser for North Wales - Welsh Newspapers Online
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15G YEARS AGO. 4

LOCAL GOVERNMENT JOTTINGS.…

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FRODSHAM PARISH REGISTERS.…

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THE CHESHIRE ASSOCIATION.

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AGRICULTURE IN PARLIAMENT-…

ECCLESTON.

BRIDGE TRAFFOIID.

WHAT PUDDING IS IT TO-DAY?

LITERARY NOTICES.

"THE MOTHS OF THE BRITISH…

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"Final Natural History Essays" (by Graham Renshaw, M.B., F.Z.S., illustrated. London and Manchester: Sherratt and Hughes; 6s.). "Debrett's Peerage, Baronetage, Knight- age and Clornp&niona.(, 1008," (Lonflon: Dean and Son, Ltd., 160a, FTeet-street.E.O. 31s. 6d. nett). "THE MOTHS OF THE BRITISH ISLES" (by Riohard Louth, F.E.S. London: Fredk. Wam-e and Co., Chandos House, Bedford-street, S'traiid; 7s. 6d.).—The fact that the author of the vo!ume is the well-known editor of "Tho Entomologist" and the author of "The Butter- flies of the British Isles, ought to ba a sufficient guarantee of the thorough and woikmanlike character of the work. Like many other books on natural history published by the same firm in the "Wayside and Woodland" series, the volume is profusely illustrated with accurately coloured examples of every species and many varieties. There ano no fewer than 670 iliuatra- tions, w'hich aro of the utmost, value to the student, cspoci-aily tho drawings of eggs, cater- pillars, chiysalis and food plants comprised in Li-ii, families sphingidaj to noctuidse. Compared with our butterflies, remarks the author in the profaoe, the number of moths found in the British laics is very Large. "Like the butter- flies. moths, too, are dependent upon plant life, and almost every kind of herb, busii or tiIGe will be found to nourish the caterpillars of one or more species of moth." The usefulness of this "vado meeum" is apparent, when it is re- flected that the field boianist and the country rambler constantly comes acioss moths or cater- pailars that not only interest but puzzle. The first thing the true student desires is to know something about their habits, their life*-hi story and the position they occupy in tho arrange- ment and classification of natural history ob- jects. Those who have read Mr. Louth's in- structive work on butterflies wiU perceive that he has treated moths on the same practical lines, 4 much information on t.he subject being crowded into the space available. If any one should be disposed to quarrel with the author on account of his condensed descriptions, ample compensation is found in the life-like pictures which are presented, and which are really more useful to the know Ledge-seeker than the best written paragraph or chapter. Two conclusions are warrantable from this publication, (1) that the average entomologist will be profoundly appreciative and grateful, and (2) that the volume will tend to an extension and increase of this highly-interesting branch of study. FARMER AND STOCKBREEDER YEAR BOOK (Messrs. Macdonald amd Martin, 6, Essex- street, Strand, London; Is.)-In this year book for 1908 is a fine variety of subj xts discussed by able writers and illustrated in a manner which leaves nothing to bo desired. It not only is a thoroughly practical manual for far- mers and bieedois, but is a useful volume for reference. The feattircs include a record of the season's pedigree stock trade in public sale rings, and a resume of the show season in con- nection with the various breeds of livo stock. The numerous tables of reference and statisti- cal particulars provided at the end of the Year Book, the gestation tables and calendars, pre- serve tho almanac features so much appreciated by farmers. The articles include a discourse on "Rofhamsted and Its Woik," by Mr. J. J. Willis. Mr. C. Armstrong deals with "Horses and Hunting," while Mr. James Jebson writes on "Carriage Horses and Their Breeding." Prof. J. Win tor has a contribution on "Welsh Black Cattie and Their Improvement," in the course of which he discusses the efforts which are being made by breeders in various districts to grade up the cattle of th, Principality. Dairy farmers will rc-ad with interest Mr. Walker Tisdolc's discourse on "Buttc-r-making with Experiences of Butter Samples." There are many other interesting papers. The illus- trations are profuse, and include, in the shire hoise section, pictures of Earl Egerton's Tatton Friar, bred by the lato John Ball, of Shotwick Lodge, and the oolt foal, Eaton Drayman, bred by the Duke of Westminster. THE DECEMBER MAGAZINES. (Third Notice.) The Christmas number of the "Queen" has as a supplement a really fine work of art, a as a supplement a really fine work of art, a Rembrandt gravure reproduction on a large scale of the original painting, "Sir Roger De Ooverley," by Fred Morgan, the well-known artist. It is a delightful picture of children, and made a great impression, when exhibited at the Royal Academy last year. The number itself is filled with matters appropriate to the season. The Christmas number of "The Grand Maga- Ûuo" contains many pages of excellent reading, while it can scarcely be said to cater particu- larly for the season. Mary Choimondeloy, the woll-liked author of "Red Pottage," gives her "beat story," and a very pathetic tale of a tragedy it is. In "Matrimonial Squabbles" Maud Ohurton Braby expresses the very frank opinions of a woman of tho world on the question. One reads with wonder the impres- sions (under the title "Road Experiences") of a parson who was operated upon for appendi- citis after being locally ansestheticised by the method of "lumbar puncture" lately introduced, one of the greatest, triumpiis of modern sur- gory. This interesting account was communi- cated to the "Grand" by a well-known physician, to whom it was sent in the form of a Letter by a former patient.

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