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- LITERARY NOTICES. +.

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T'D9Cl MR. H. TOLLEMACHE'S…

- THE HOME-COMING

SERIOUS STATEMENT BY A PHYSICIAN.…

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BURNS NIGHT IN CHESTER. «

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"NOTHING CHEAPER OR BETTER…

CHESHIRE HUNT BALL.

RAILWAY ACCIDENT AT DUNHAM.…

PUBLIC-HOUSE TRUST. -

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BURNS NIGHT IN CHESTER. «

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saw what his early education wasâno such schemes of education existed in those days as that which was to-day presided over by Mr. H. T. Brcwr.-(laugh tr)-no such opportunities of learning as were now within the reach cf everyone, both in Scotland and Ergland-;cr he was taught by hi3 father :n ehe first instance, and all his education was got under struggle and difficulty, they must admit that Burns stood out as a wonderful example of what could be aocoir pi nhed by perseverance. (Ap- plause.) h vvTuld be presumptuous of b m (the speaker) to offer anything like a review of Burns's remarkable ooeros. but there were one or two which struck even one -0 unfamiliar with, them as he wa; They all knew that wonderful poem "The C-citar' Saturday Night." (Applause.) In reading that, and it was well worth reading again and again, they could not help rising from the study of it without the oonvicteon that, what- erfer there might have been m Burns's tfe. he was at the bottom a deeply religious man. The pic- ture he presented of the religious life of Scotland, and which he believed was still maintained in many & home in Sootland, was a most touching one. (Applause.) An example of the poets fine feeling of loyalty to the Throne, coopled with democratic sentiment, was found in the Wha will not sing" God Save the King Shall hang as high's the steeple; But while we sing God Save the King P We'll ne'er forget the people. AMa jor8 Lead better submitted "The land we live in," and Dr. Parry responded. â Mr. J. Cullimore proposed "The land o cakes, contending that Sootland contained the most beautiful gems of scenery it was possible for the eve of man to behold. Mr. W. Ferguson responded. Mr. J. A. McMichael gave "The City and Trade of Chester." The Sheriff, in responding, said Chester was a city of which every native might j*stly feel proud to belong, for it had unequalled charms. It had the pride of antiquity, and a past of historical greatness, while it had as- pirations to take its place in the rank of those towns and cities of our country which lived the life of the present. As to the estimation in which the city and its trade were held, he might point out that a few months ago the city attempted to raise a loan of £182,000, which they had almost in a moment for the asking. That was more than some towns could say, and the major portion of that money came out of Lancashire, which was noted for its hard-headed business men. (Hear, hear.) Although he was not a member of the Lighting Committee, might he point out what had been achieved by it? Although it had been m existence only four_or five years, what had hap- pened? They had paid out of profits £ 1,600, and in addition to that they had paid out of revenue to the sinking fund £ 10,000, which in itself was a proof that the lighting affairs of the city were managed in a business-like manner. (Applaase.) It was too soon as yet to speak of the profit-earn- ing capacity of the tramways, but although they had been running only some 288 or 289 days they had oarried 1,690,584 passengers, and had earned a revenue of £ 7.538, from which he thought that even in this, the first year, there would be no charge upon the rates. (Applause.) And when he reminde them that the manager of the tram- ways and the chairman of the Tramways Com- mittee were both Scotchmen, they might take it for granted that they would be managed well, and that due economy would be observed. (Laughter and applause.) In the markets the city had a valuable asset, and during the past year the Markets Committee had taken what many of them considered a movement in the right direc- tion by issuing hawkers' licences. This had re- sulted in an income during the first quarter of JB76, three-fourths at least of which had been col- lected from persons residing outside the city. This proved that the city might be congratulated upon the fiscal policy of the Markets Committee. (Hear, hear.) Another matter of interest he would like to refer to as affecting the trade of the city, was the fact that last year they spent 255 in adver- tising the place, an amount which this year they hoped to double, for when they considered the unrivalled attractions of the city-its noble river, its time-honoured walls, its magnificent Cathe- dral, its ancient rows, its antiquarian treasures and historical associations, not to mention its close proximity to such princely seats as those of Eaton and Hawardenâthey would agree with him that any sum was wisely expended which brought visitors to see these attractions, and thus help in some measure to improve the trade of the city. (Applause.) Dr. Roberts proposed "The Chester Caledonian Association," and alluded to the similarity be- tween Scotchmen and Welshmen. The singing of "Auld lang syne" brought an en- joyable evening to a close. The toasts were in- terspersed with capital songs by Messrs. E. Robinson. Walter Fercrusson. G. H. Plant, R. Hill, and J. Phillips; Mr. Walter Howick proving an excellent accompanist.