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PERSONAL AND SOCIAL.

JOTTINGS FROM NA TURE.

! WEEK BY TVEEK.

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Conway Corporation and Mr.…

Sunday Golf at Penmaenmawr.

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Death ofMr. John Marsan, Rhos-on-Sea.

Mr. Lloyd George.

Carnarvon Boroughs.

I COLWYN BAY.

A FIGHT FOR FREEDOM.

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the day of the poll it is of course impossible to forecast, but it is difficult to see why they should support Mr. Austin Jones on his own merits as revealed by himself. The candi- date who assures an audience that, if Tariff Reform should raise the cost of living to the working classes, he will insist upon his party passing a law to force the employers to pay increased wagesâwell, that candidate has a great deal to learn before he can prove his fitness to represent an intelligent electorate in Parliament. But this is the type of op- ponent who seeks to displace the most dis- tinguished statesman our country has pro- duced, a Minister of the Crown whose name is honoured throughout the Empire, alike for his rare personal courage and his splendid political sagacity. We have never held that the Conservatives of the Boroughs are not entitled to oppose Mr. Lloyd George's return to Parliament, but for their own credit's sake we would expect them to bring forward a candidate capable of presenting an intelligible exposition of their political faith. That this condition again is lamentably lacking is only too clearly proved by the Deganwy speech and the election address. Mr. Austin Jones may some day enter St. Stephens, and if he does so we wish him a successful Parliament- ary career. But whatever the future may have in store for him he has not up to now evinced that aptitude for statesmanship which one would expect to find in a candi- date whose aim is to unseat a Member who has long since proved his special fitness, not only to represent Carnarvon Boroughs, but to be the chosen leader of the democracy of these islands. Mr. Austin Jones, quite apart from any opinion as to his personal abilities, comes before the electorate with a blank record. Mr. Lloyd George, in seeking a renewal of his own people's confidence, submits a record of long, faithful, self-sacrificing, distinguished and fruitful service. Which will they pre- fer ? Surely they will chose to be repre- sented by a Member who has accomplished great things on their behalf, and who has paved the way for even greater benefits in the future. Sentiment has a great deal to I do with the results of elections in some places. But Mr. Lloyd George would scorn to appeal to mere sentiment in this contest, even although it is overwhelmingly in his favour. No he comes forward with an inalienable right to point to his record of honest work done. Moreover, he comes forward as the champion of principles which he believes in and cherishes, principles that are dear to the hearts of the vast majority of his countrymen, those principles which ennoble and uplift a nation and are destined to prevail. By voting for Mr. Lloyd George, the electors range themselves in the ranks of that great army which is fighting for the principle of free citizenship of a free Empire. Mr. Austin Jones in his address tries to mis- lead the public by obscuring the real issues. Masquerading in borrowed plumes, he is vain enough to suppose that the electors will take him for what he is not. He pays lip service to the very principles which Mr. Lloyd George has so long and so valiantly espoused, but directly his utterances are examined the note of insincerity becomes painfully discordant. He is foolish enough to expect that the wonderful dodge to sweep Lancashire," which resulted in such a complete rout of the Tariffites, will succeed in deluding the people of his native land, those people of a mountainous country for whom his friend Mr. F. E. Smith has such a profound contempt. The clever tactics, which proved too clever by half in Manchester and elsewhere, are doomed to similar failure in Carnarvon Boroughs. Instead of those tricky catch- words, adopted by the disunited Unionist party in a panic, Mr. Lloyd George stands before the people he has served and clearly and boldly proclaims his views, which show that he has not deviated by a single hair's breadth from the line of policy he was chosen by them to pursue. Our Chancellor in giving an account of his faithful steward- ship can claim to have more than justified the confidence reposed in him. What, then, is the duty of the electors towards him ? It is to give him a renewed proof of their con- fidence and admiration and gratitude by returning him to Parliament with a grand majorityâa majority such as will strengthen and hearten him in his fight, against such heavy odds, on behalf of popular liberties.

Sunday Golf at Penmaenmawr.