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THE TITHE WAR IN FLINTSHIRE.

I ST. ASAPH BOARD OF GUARDIANS.

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ST. ASAPH BOARD OF GUARDIANS. atTS? f°Artninhtly me^ing ?f this Board was held at St. Asaph, on Thursday when there were present-l\fessrs Edwin Morgan (in the chair). Jos. Lloyd J Robert- (vice-chairmen) S. Perks. J.P., Ll. Lloyd, J.P., J. Briscoe J P., T. Howes Ro'erts W_ Jon, R. Robert-i (Dyserth Hall), J. Vausrhan ,MaUhs"S wiUSiaJ,âsMtUrr"y' J' Da"eS' 1 THE HOUSE. THE HOUSE. The Master reported the number of inmates in the House last board day to be 145; admitted since, 1;,? iir"6 remaiain £ in the House at e' 'f6,; corresponding period last year, Loo increase, 13. |! rv,1?16# of vagrants relieved during tlicj pa«t fortnight was 143, as compared with 9^ corresponding period last year increase, 45. 3 THE ALLEGED BURIAL SCANDAL AT ABERGELE A letter 13 read from Mr K. Roberts, sexton bergde, applying for payment of the sum o ^â¢> cr0sl.no a grave in Abergele Churchyard according to instructions from the Master of the the House and in doing so informed the Board that during the year 1887 19 burials had taken place in the above Church-yard. Mr J. Roberts said that the committee were not willing that the money should be paid, but the Abergele guardians were in favour of paying the money, and Mr Jones, the master, and Mr Grimsley also thought they should pay the money. Mr rirnsley explained the circumstances of the case, from which it would appear tnat an old man of the name of David Owens, an inmate of the workhouse, died on the Saturday following last bllard day. On hearing of the death of the old man one of his relatives came to the House, ,ind the Master arranged with him to go to Aber- Se â¢ak? arrangements for the interment. 1 he Master instructed the man to go in the first instance to the vicar, to ascertain if the body could be interred in the Churchyard, and if so to take the other order to make the grave to the exton. In the event of the vicar not allowing the burial to take place in the Churchyard, he provided him with another order to take to the fcJurial Board It would appear that the messenger Te'! rrS to.â¢6 sexton, and arranged with him 'hat the burial should take place in the Church- yaid. Ihe vicar ruled that the burial could not take place in the Churchyard, aud there seems to take place in the Churchyard, and there seems to have been some difference on the point between t,ie V1,ca,r ai^ the sexton, the latter maintaining that the burial could take place. The vicar had written to him (Mr Grimsley) and had explained the matter. The sexton, however, bad opened the grave, and the interment not, being allowed to take place in the Churchyard he had to close the grava for which service he now demanded the pay- ment of the bill he had sent. Mr Jos. Lloyd was of opinion that they were I bound to pay the bill, inasmuch as he was acting uuder instructions received from the Master. Mr .J. Roberts (Geinas) said that nobody knew letter than the sexton that the man could not lie buried there, and he ope-ied the grave in a spirit d revenue against the clergyman, Mr Evans. But as long as the man had received ail order fro,n Board he moved that the bill be paid. Mr J. Vaughan seconded the propos tioa. Mr Perks said lie had no feeling whatever on the subject, but as a matter of principle he would propo-e an amend mellt, that the money be not i);tid, as the sexton was perfectly aware of all the circumstances and consequently he was of opinion that he could not sustain his claim. Mr Jos Lloyd But did he get an order from us ? Mr Jones, the Master, explained that the man had died on Saturday morciny, and in: the after- noon a relative came who told him that her husband had promised the deceased that should he die before him that he would see that he WAS buried with his parents in a grave at Abergele Churchyard. The old man had on one or two occasions had leave of ab-ellee, and du, ing one of these absences he had seen Mr Kobe ts, the sexton, and asked him that he should be buried with his f tther and mother at the Churchyard. The sexton t'romised to do so as there was plenty of room in he grave He sent the purter in the evening with the separate lIlll ial forms, and told him to tell Samuel Owens. a relative of the deceased, to go with the first ortler to the vicar, and see if the tody could be buried in the Churchyard, and if SO to take the second order to open the grave- to the sexton. A third order was written, to the secretary of the Burial Boards, in tie event of the vicar not allowing the interment at the Church- yard It would seem that Owens went on Sunday morning to Abergele to see the vicar, but there WAS a communion service being held at the Church tt the time, and the vicar was conducting the service, so he could not see him. He, howeve-, met Mr Roberts, the sexton, who to'd him that if David Owens should die before him that he had promised to bury him with his father and mother, ind he would see I.hat this was carried our. Samuel Owens replied that he had promised him the same thing. Owens then left the matter in the hanus of the sexton, and went away with the understanding that everything was all right and lie had he trd nothing further about the matter until he heard from Mr Grimsley that the vicar had written him a lette,, criticising his (the Master's) conduct in the matter. But he was told that he was not to b ame, as his instructions that the vicar's c nsent should be first ascertained were S-iffirieuth exp icit. Mr P,i-ks said he was informed that the sexton was acting PERFECTLY ill-gal in opening the grave wit oui fir t O taining he periaission of the Vicar. Mr 1. ROOT-ITS said thdt the grave had been opened with the result that a number of bones, in some cases with the flesh attached to them,had beeu dug up. Mr Wm. Williams said he was informed that the deceased's father and mother had been interred in that, grave in the year 8 11 if that was so how could there be any flesh attached to the bones, after atieh a lapse of time. The sexton in his letter said that 19 interments had t.ken place there during THF past year. If that was correct, he (Mr William6) would like to know, why it was refused in thif case. The Clerk said he believed that interments were only allowed to be made in the yard in special cases. A question was asked as to what was meant b) -pecial cases. The Clerk replied, such as a wife being interrea in the same grave as her husband, or husband with his wife. Mr Williams thought a son ought to be allowen to be buried with his mother and father. Mr Roberts (Geiuas), said that the Master when he gave the order was perfectly aware that tho Abergele Churchyard was closed, and therefore thought he was to bltme. The Master denied that there was any blame at- tached to him, for he was met with the argument that there was plenty of room in the Churchyard, -tud that interments had taken place there during the past year, and when he gave the order he dis- tinctly told the porter to tell his relatives that he must go in the first instance to the Vicar, and afte obtaining his consent to go with the order to the sexton. Mr Williams asked if there was not a tombstone on the grave. A reply was made in the affirmative. Mr Williams, continuing, said if there were H buried in the yard in 1887, he did not see why that pour man should not be allowed to be buried there tie believed that the sexton exceeded his duty in opening the grave without first obtaining the vicar > permission, still that was a matter between the vicar and the sexton Mr J. Vaughan said he believed that the story about there being bones scattered about was very much exaggerated, as far as he understood there was only two old sculls dug up, and they tried to make cipital out uf that. He thonght that the sexton had done quite right, for why should pauperc NOT be allowed to be buried in the Churchyard as well as other people. Mr Perks said he would like the Guardians to uuderstaud that the sexton knew very well that it was necessary to get the consent of the vicar before the grave could be opened. Mr Davies thought that paupers should be treated like other people. Mr Grim-ley said he saw the vicar a few days who told him that only the other yveek a pau- per had been buried in the churchyard. Mr W. Jones said there was no doabt whatever but that the vicar treaied paupers in the same way as he did other people. After some further discussion the amendment was put to the meeting, when seven voted for and eight against. The motion was then put to the meeting and declared carried. APPOINTMENT OF COOK. The Master reported that in answer to the adver tisemeuttl for a cook, two applications had been re* ;eived, viz. from Ann Jones, Mold, and Mary Evans, Denbigh. The latter only sent a testimonial with her application, and she was called into the room. A few questions having been asked, and satisfactorily answered, she was unanimously ap- pointed at a salary of £ 20 per annum, including oeer money. I A PAINFUL CASE. The Chairman said that the next business was a most painful one he referred to the case of the Abergele Relieving Officer, who, as they were no doubt aware, was obliged to be taken to the asylum I on Friday last- He held in his hand a letter fromDr. .I Griffiths, and also a petition signed by many in Abergele, in favour of allowing the office to remain open until such time at he would be able to resume duty. He (the chairman) thought that un lor the circumstances tnev should trv and keep the office open as ong as they cou d. Dr. Griffiths thought that the officer's R,,HJ was onlv temporary deranged and hI8 opinion was C- .boated by Dr Cox, of the Asylum. He therefore thought it best to make some arrangements to keep TRIE office open. He believed that Mr Jones, the Denbigh relieving 4.1! WAA TO ASSIST Mrs Wil iams to carrv « thf rrt,7The ofB"» <»n*i r .âd .7 HTW». !TM'F A«R«"Me to assist Mr, Willli.MS. was therefore «ppo.nted to the office. HOD to E R ;RTL,TTSOR^RI:IOB "WNSR01 HE TO arrangement. W"S 0li"ed ⢠a°d ac'iuiesoed '» lh« THE BOUNDARIES QUESTION. A letter was read from the Assistant Commission- er, expressing his intention to hold a public inquiry in regard to the boundaries question, and asking the Board to mention a place, date and time for the holding of the inquiry. The following PIAR.Eg were Inamed viz., Denbigh, St. Asaph, and tihyl. Five voted for Denbigh and Rhyl, and seven for St. Asaph; it was therefore agreed to submit the name of St. Asaph, and also to suggest that the inquiry should be held at 2-30 in the afternoon, but that the meeting should not be held before the flrst week in March.

RHYL PETTY SESSIONS.

øtts anD ^ummarg.1

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VERY MUCH MARRIED.

. A LUCKY ANSWER.

»■-A GALLANT GAMECOCK.

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