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SCKIPTURE ILUJSTBA'I'IOSS.—iSo.…

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THE PRINCE OF AUCTlONKcRS.

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THE PRINCE OF AUCTlONKcRS. The following portrait ol the greatest hero of the hammer now I i >â i ngâthat his ever livedâor pro- babiv that ever will live âis copied from the last Number of ij'.I(tcliti-vo(I's "There is still something I ike character left in this level yvorld. The London auctioneers arc characters. The celebi ated Christie, w ho flourish- ed about half a century ago, still figures in the rccordsef auctioneer eloquence. The hammer iu his hand was his thunderbolt with it be knocked (io%vii lilr)re oaks, I)iils, and I)ariil, t[ii,ii lif, of Oivtnpus ever smote with his fires. His tongue was the cesius that cillhellishcd, graced, and coloured all that it touched. It was he who rt)iiildc,tl a description ot' i. iiiit in view (li' 'I'vbiirn by pronouncing that it had the advantage ot, i. hanging wood in vieyv, and talked of a running stream in the neighbourhood oi a mansion the mansion being a warehouse, and the stream ITeet Ditch. It was he who found the perfumes of Arabia in the neighbourhood of a codec-shop, and promised the beaioies ol a tropical landscape in a Held planted half with potatoes ami hait with tobacco. Rut if he was eloquent, descriptive, and Irish, be w as, notwithstanding, au honest man. To expect him to be a man of his word was out ot the question, vet h" was faithful to his engagements, and though estates slipped through his fingers as fast as through those of Lo-'d Barryinore or Hughes Ball, lie made money. George Robins is now the successor to the taiiie of this celebrated personage. George Robins is now by far the most eloquent man of his own profession. The famous Maugvaby, who now figures in Alexandria, to the astonish- ment ofthe Quarterly Bei'ieic andot all the loungers of the Mediterranean, is a bungler compared with the dextrous touch, the quick prediction, and the unhesitating dexterity ot George Robins' skill in the ideal. His fame is, like Mr Green's, above the earth; )ike.,Iir itigilby, he is the prince of con jurors; õcUJd like the late George Canning, for fancy figure and, and fiction. unsurpassable. As an evidence tltat our is not ill-tounded we shall give three examples ot iiis eloquence which have met our eve in one column of a newspaper. The first is a cottage in Devon, which lie 'oll'ors for public competition.he word sale being alto- gether below the subject. He declares that this cottae IS ;ittiate(i it, spot which even those ac- customed to the varied loneliness of this beautiful county, universally admit to be the garden of South Devon; that it is completely iinbeded in its own wild IllxurJous gro,in(is t ",t"nch,' S¡HS George Robins, 4 in need of no auxiliary beauties, for Nature hath most liberally gifted it -it is inac- cessible to the sight, save only from the sea, upon which it peeps, and obtains a view of the limped Bayof Bahbicomhe, which has, with great truth and justice, been likened to the Bay of Naples.' This is pretty weil tor a cottage. VVe now come to something of a orderâ an estate ill the same county. I 'i'liis sAy, George, 'needs not the artificial aid of ornament throughout the county, for it is t0o well known to require panegyric; but the following concise and imperfect statement is intended with a view lu i a (ii,t,,i,ce:-It is ,ate(i in a luxuriant valley; protected during the inclement season by it,, itil('iltl-e ot' hills surrounded by park scenery "t Surpassing beaui v, w ith a never- ending combination of hill aud dale; adorned by majestic woods, Ihe COU.,lallt ulldulalioll of the grounds combining t0 f{â-n, perfect Claude scene. The abundance ot fish caught within sight of the drawinif-rooni yvould render ihe vocation of a neigh- bouring fishmonger a yvork of supererogation. The wiuter appears a stranger to the estate, and the climate i> so congenial to longevity, that even an East Indian valetudinarian, who in despair had resigned himse'f 10 a very limited period of years, may here find a solace, arising out of the salut.rity of the air, that wdl awaken to him the cheering prospect of a renewed lease of health and \jg-Hur: Till' pa..lures eO'lIe ill for a ,.hare (,f the pallryric, -9 and are described as possessing ihe facility of fatten- ing cattle with great quickness; it being further de- clared that Soinhfield owes to ihem a heavy debt of gratitude.' The estate has another treasure iu A Magnificent Rock ot Marble, which appears inter- minable and it profit be in the mind's eye of a pur- chaser, he will find the rock capable of erecting a second city of Bath.' This we look upon as a showy specimen of his grand s'yle; the next and last ex- hibits his genius in the picturesque and poetic. "This is the (lelitteatioii of a third estate, the man- sion of yvhich is described as being seated, or rather I ii(,stlinlr titi(ler file bi-o%v of a I;ill.' Vie are told that the majestic timber which ornaments the haug- iusj woods includes the monarch oi" Hie forest, Willi pines of stately growth Ihe rising grounds afford shelter from ihe wintry wind, while the valley, teem- ing with wild f'etiilily, refreshes and aids the de- lightful illusion. The mansion is of stone, of modern elevation, avoiding all the faults of the present school withia Iller" is that which passeih show, tor corllfort in itsmost intelligible fuiin prevails through- out.' All this is very clever, and must he very tempt- ing, but George Robins has another bait for the pur- chaser, a bait for his ambitionâami if auy man, with a few thousands to iiii-ow away, has a desire 1011:111'1.' at a eOlllllyekclioll, the auctioneer has found out the spot for him. 'It may not be amiss,' says he, 'to al- lude to the forthcoming contest lor this district, when the possessor of ibis estate yvill put in very strong claims to be one of the representatives of the county.' f\|| iiij., Hi in1; irresistible; alld after this varied display of hi- talent, who shall venture to deny thai George Robins is the Prince ot Orators and Auctioneers? "The question has been di-puied whether a man <>l genius is or is not, igaorant of liis oyvn powers. We contend that he is not, and quote our celebrated auctioneer as an example. The newspapers mention thai, some tillle "¡lIcc,hc met it prolessioual brother, of provincial lame of the name of Wat kins. 'Sir,' said the London I i,iii happy lo recognize in you the tieorge Robins of ttie West.' S i I- 'it; (I ihe Mail ofthe West,' 1 reciprocate the compliment, Ili(, (it' ,tiid I), oli,i to sce- ill you file of the Metropolis.' TliVre have brou hiut* < h it he has tn.ido lur^e col I Oct ions for h is liisi ory ami '11 11 11 ^<M y man writes his memoirs, when no great man dies u iihout being instantly pqnuced upon hy a host, thai, like the kites or vultures, blacken round his dying flours to pick up all that they can lay hold ol, we hope that George Robins wiil act the gieat man make his faille secure; write his own biography, lor fear of accidents; and let what wilI come of plicards, harangues, and hammers, niaivc IlIllIsell the Silak- speare of all auctioneers to come.

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