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SCKIPTURE ILUJSTBA'I'IOSS.—iSo.…

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CHIT CHAT.I -i

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THE PRINCE OF AUCTlONKcRS.

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AGLUCULTUKE, COUMtiRC^ j AND…

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RO TTIT: EOlTOR OF THE GAZETTE…

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RO TTIT: EOlTOR OF THE GAZETTE & GUARDIAN. SiR, NYe liave in a former lett T called your at- tention to the practical safety of the Davy Lamp; and are now induced, by an insinuation c ist out in llip last paragraph of .Messrs. Bursill s letter to the Editor of the Mining Journal, against the safety of the Davy' Lamp, to throw out a tew hints iu de- 1 nee of that lamp, which has had an universal adoption The paragraph thus reads. 1 tie lamp of Messrs. Upton and Roberts bas, like the Davy La 1 pt qualities sui generis, which it is highly dan- gerous to tamper with. We would like to know what those qualities are, and whether thev be peculiar to this lamp, or whether they have, as an immediate cause, ever been known to operate \o the production ot acci- r, 0 r u dent. We have had uianv opportunities of testing the safety of the lamp of Sir Humphry, and ot test- ing it to the utmost too, "ithout that lamp ever failing. We have used it iu air «;o inflammable, that in a short time the gauze has been red hot by the (lame or fire within, and so intense was the hea< ot the circumambient atmosphere, that one could scarcely bear it any length of time; and vet that lamp did not fail. This was not for a momentary trial, but rather an hourly one. The above did not happen once in our history, but often nor did we ina^e trial of one lamp well-selected, hut with m ⢠11 y, and they promiscuously taken of many scores ill daily use. Those lamps had with us a regular inter- change, i. e. as one was healed as ahove described, we then sent it out lo cool, and introduced another in its stead. Observe, this was not done iu arti- ficial gas made for experiment, hut it was done among inflammable gas extending over many yards of square area. Ifcis ii-iie our condition was not sine omni perieulo, but polius cum I)i(ili,7.tit I periculo Yet it afforded us All opportunity of testing the lamp, as, perhaps, another has not ^yet been teste. We grant, all this while, the lamp was in air almost in a quiescent state, exeep! the necessary motion produced by the transition of the lamp through the air. Here we suppose the lamp would have exerted its peculiar aud admirable influence, to counteract or neutralize the power of ignition in the surround- ing air, until the materials would have yielded to for roding influence of the internal flame. Thus, we pronounce the lamp <1 safe one, when used cau- tiously, and such caution every lamp will require. Perhaps those gentlemen, who so fearlessly put down the Davy as an unsafe lanti),ttiiy not be disposed to deny the above premises, or the conclusion drawn therefrom; yet are ready to assert, that under other circumstances the lamp would be unsafe, i.e. in any powerful concussion of the air, or when passing in au air course. That there are such emotions occa- sionally produced, and that the lalllp has sometimes to pass ill a strong current, we will not deny but that any accident has ever been known to arise from the lamp failing in those conditions, we sup- pose remains to be proved; and, therefore, the danger is rather probable than possible. Those emotions that are produced in the air in a milll" have very little influence generally on the flame of a lamp, and in a very strong current we have pased with the Davy without any harm Generally, in currents of air, there is litile of the hydrogen felt for, to produce such a current as would be in danger Or t)lowilig I ike ftlitie of tli,- lititil) the ;.ratize &c., there must be a larae proportion of atmospheric air passing iu and through the mine; and ilit-ii the hydrogen generated in the mine wi'! lie more safely diluted, and carried off.âThere is a very simple contrivance used in the North by the miners, as a safeguard in currents of air, i. e. a small piece ot tin made to fit the "side of the gauze externally, and fastened to two of the pillars. This shelters the lamp on one side, and when kept clean, reflects a better light oil the other. We do not wish to check improvement, or to prevent the introduction of a heifer liiiiii) but we would not like to give up that lamp, which has already been so tested, and has proved so safe, that we think no accident yet can be said to have happened since its introduction, that the lamp was ill fault. Those accidents have either arisen out of the want of a lnrnp, or from some thoughtless men un-erewing it, when and where they ought not to have so doue, or from some accident happening to the laitip itself. In all attempts to improve this lamp, lIIenshollltl remember these three qualities are indispensab e viz I)oy-ttibilit.it, simplicitv of' con- struction and operation, and a capability to afford a brilliant light tn the miner. Should it want the above, or auy one of them, it will in the same1 propor- tion prodnee danger. It is not for the sake of contro- very that we have takPII up the subject again, but only lo check any doubt or trepidation that may be produced in the minds of men or masters, by SlIch like hints as that which gave rise 10 this letter. Front the use of the lamp we have derived much benefit; and, therefore, won'd t culpable, if we were to bear if spoken of as unsafe, and be silent. If, Sir, this letter be worthy a place iu your columns, you will greatly oblige me by its insertion. 1 am, &c., U. THOMPSON. Taff Vale Iron AVorks, S'p. 25ih, 1837.

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