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IN BAD TASTE.

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SELECTED HEADINGS. I THE DECAY OF FALCONRY.âThe art of falconry probably came from the East, where it is still practised, and an ancient bas-relief was found by Sir Austen Layard, among the ruins of Khorsabad, depicting a falconer with a hawk on his wrist, thus proving the antiquity of the pursuit. In this country it was formerly much in vogue, and in Messrs. Salvin and Brodrick's work on Falconry iu the British Islands" there will be found an interesting risumi of the art, as performed in Great Britain from ancient times down to the present. It is lamentable to think of the way in which these noble birds, once the pride and favourite of monarchs, are now shot down and classed as vermin. The strict way of preserving ga.me which has been in vogue of late years, and the general use of firearms, have, no doubt, been the chief causes of the destruction of the larger falcons, and it will take some time to disabuse the vulgar prejudices of gamekeepers, and of some proprietors, as to the mistake that is made in killing off every kind of rap- torial bird indiscriminately. A protest which was penned by Mr. G. E. Freeman in his "Falconry," is worthy of reproduction here â" All hawks, when they have a choice, invariably choose the easiest flight. This fact is of the last importance in the matter before us. I confess that I at once give it the chief place in this argument. Who has not heard of the grouse disease ? It has been attributed, sometimes respectively, and sometimes collectively, to burnt heather to heather poisoned from the dressings put on sheep to the sheep themselves cropping the tender shoots and leaves of the plant, and thus destroying the grouse's food to the tapeworm to the shot which has wounded, but not killed ano perhaps to other things besides. It may be, I doubt not, correctly referred to any or to all of these. Of this, however, there appears no ques- tion, that from whatever cause it springs it is propagated. A diseased parent produces a dis- eased child. Now, I say that, when every hawk is killed upon a large manor, the balance of Nature is forgotten or ignored and that Nature will not overlook an insult. She would have kept her wilds healthy destroy her appointed instruments, and beware of her revenge I"âFrom Cassell's Natural History." THE idea that is impossible to propel ships at the rate of forty knots an hour, or at some speed much higher than existsatpresent, is being discussed both in this country and in America. Professor Thurston, of the Sibley College, has recently taken up the subject, and concludes that it is possible. The ship he proposes is to be 800 feet long, 80 feet beam, and 25 feet draught, with a displacement of about 38,000 tons. He estimates the power required to propel her at 250,000 horses. He calculates that her machinery and boilers will weigh only 601b per horse power, or 7500 tons in all. She would burn about 175 tons of coal an hour, 3200 tons a day, and 10,500 tons for a voyage from Liverpool to New York. The total weight of fuel and machinery would be about 18,000 tons, leaving 20,000 tons for the ship and cargo. For the hull he allows 12,000 tons, leaving 8,000 tons for crew, passengers, and cargo. Those to whom days and months and all places are alike may make use of unexpected discoveries, break the thread of their arrangements, and take it up again at pleasure. This forms the true de- light of travelling 5 remove# all that is stereotyped and conventional; often yields adventures which break the monotony of days that might otherwise fucceed and resemble each other only too closely leads to scenes unheard of, and unrecorded, but not the less beautiful for that reason. It is the fatality of life, the contradiction of human nature, that as a rule those to whom such things are pos sible are wanting in the spirit of enterprise whilst to those who would make use of every opportunity time and circumstances are denied.- The Argosy. MANY parents who are polite and polished in their manners towards the world at large are per- fect boors inside the home circle. What wonder if children are the same ? If a man should acci- dentally brush against another in the streets, an apology would be sure to follow; but who ever thinks of offering an apology to the little people whose rights are constantly being violated by their careless elders ? If a stranger offer the slightest service, he is gratefully thanked but who ever remembers to thus reward the little tireless feet that are travelling all day long upstairs and down on countless errands for somebody ? It would be policy for parents to treat their children politely for the sake of obtaining more cheerful obedience, if for no other reason. IN windy weather the hair becomes dry and unruly, which is consequent on increased evapora- tion, for, amongst other things, the hair is composed of animal matter and salts, and this combination has the peculiar property of attracting moisture. Chemists have an instrument called a hygrometer âliterally a measure of moisture-and the hair, when freed from fatty matter, is itself a hygro- meter just, in fact, as is the piece of seaweedâ the favourite weather-glass of our ancestorsâhung up in one's hall. To the melanic, or dark-haired, are apportioned the greater part of the habitable globe. Europe is the chief seat of the xantho comio or light-haired races indeed, they seem to be almost-confined to its limits, and within those limits to be cooped up in certain degrees of north latitude. THE following are given as some examples of retribution in this life :âBajazet was carried about by Tamerlane in an iron cage, as he intended to carry Tamerlane. Mazentius built a bridge to en trap Constantine and was overthrown himself on that very spot. Alexander VI. was poisoned by the wine which he had prepared for another. Charles IX. made the streets of Paris run with blood, and soon after blood streamed from all parts of his body. Cardinal Beaton condemned George Wishart to death, and presently died a violent death himself; he was murdered in bed, and his body was laid out in the same window from which he had looked upon Wishart's execution. PROBABLY more of the idleness and thriftlessness of the unfortunate and the inertness and langour of others comes from repeated discouragements, draining away hope and energy, than from any other single cause. It is true that inaction and uselessness come also from other causes. There are people who are never discouraged, because they never have warm desires or put forth earnest efforts. Yet these are exceptions. Most of us are swayed alternately by the opposite feel- ings of hope and discouragement, and, as the former incites our powers to action, the latter benumbs and paralyses them. THE death of a man's wife is like cutting down an ancient oak that has long shaded the family mansion. Henceforth the glare of the world, with its cares and vicissitudes, falls upon the old widower's heart; and there is nothing to break the force, or shield him from the full weight of misfortune. It is as if his right hand were withered as if one wing of his angel was broken, and every movement that he made brought him to the ground. His eyes are dimmed and glassy and when the film of death falls over him, he misses those accustomed tones which have smoothed Mo rkasiK.xflre to the srrave.

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