Hide Articles List

9 articles on this Page

[No title]

JOTTINGS.

Advertising

RHYL PETTY SESSIONS.

News
Cite
Share

RHYL PETTY SESSIONS. MONDAY, AUGUST 26th. Before T. LI. Murray Browne, W. Wynne, and W. T. Qirdlettone, Esqs. WALKING INTO THE LION'S DEN. I James Gain, « dyer by trade, and a Carnar- vonshire Militiaman, hut now on tramp, pleaded I guilty to being drunk and disorderly on Satur- day- « P.c. Tanffe deposed that the prisoner citnei into the polico station in a dru» feen 6b.tp. He was with difficulty pessuaded to leave, but as he became very disorderly in Wei ington Hoad, the man was forcibly taken back. In answer to the charge prisoner said he had only gone into the police station to scygood bye to In»-pec'or MoLaren. as ho was ab-ut leaving tbo townâ(Laughter.) The Inspector in reply to the bench, said he knew neitherthe mnD, nor arything abouthim, further than that he was a vagrant, who had been gathering rags arid bones in the town. The Chairman to prisoner: Is there anyone who can give you a good character p Prisoner: Everybody can give me a good character, but my wife's is the only face I know in court-(Laughti r.) The prisoner further explained with regard to the closencsa wiih which bis hair bad been cropped, that he had to keep it short owing to sicknePE-(Lauohter) The JUEticfS ultimately allowed the man to go on payment of 2. 6J., the costs being rtmit. ted, warning him, however, not to appear there egain.-Prisoner thanked them, and bade good- bye to all, adding that he would never again be seen in that court A YOUNG THIEF SENT TO A REFORMATORY. John Humphreys, 12 years of age, was brought up in custody on remand on two charge of larceny,a boys' suit ot clothe. value 31s. 6d. the property of Bobert Hughes, Penybryn, and also one pair of shoes and a handkerchief, value 5s., the property of Wi liam GriffithF, also of Penybryn. It appears from the evidence that the prisoner was on tramp, having lately been occupied at Old Colwyn. On Thursday he took the articles from Penybryn,and was subsequently discovered hiding in a d:tch, we ring the stolen clothes. To P.c John the prisoner admitted taking the clrthes, because his own weie so ragged and shabby. On h'm was found also a silver watch which the boy paid belonged to Mr Sam Davies, fishmonger, Old Oulwyn with whom he had been working, and from whom he had stolen it.. From a report which Inspector McLaren had received, it appears that the boy was received into the Ruthin workhouse in 1877, having been deserted by his mother, a woman of bad character. He was discharged in 1888 to go into service, and was re-admitted the same year, when he ttole eight fggs. He had been in several situations, all of which he left after being only a few weeks in each. The court said thut the kindest thing towarJs both the prisoner and everybody else was to send him to a reformatory. He had been behaving brdly, not only on these, but on previou- occasions, whilst at the reformatory he would get a good fresh start. As a matter of form he would be fined JE1 and costs, or 14 dafB, and afterwards seot to a reformatory for four years. That would be his punishment n the first case, whilst in the second he would be rcquited to come up for judgment when called upon. DISAGREEMENT ON BOARD A VESSEL BETWEEN A MAN AND WIF I-i this case Esther Neal had summoned her husband John Robert Neal, bar-proprietor on board tlio 1, Cambria," for an aggravated assault Mr J. Lewis Morgan appeared tor the complain- ant and Mr Gamlio for defendant. Mr Morgan said It at the detei dant was bar- keeper on board the teamer Cambria," vibeie bis wite apsisted him. He had rented the I bars from Mr Redhead for t2 i week, and the assault took p'ace on board ibe vessel cn the n'ght of thp 2Sth (f July, wbeo it was anchored at Rhvl. The parties were married only last December, his client having at the time a daughter seven years o!d, defendant being a widower with three children. They had not lived very happily since, owing partly to defend. ant's coi duct towarcs his client's d .us^hter. Having described the qnanel on the night in question, Mr Morgan calied Father Neal, who said that at present she resided at 130, Wellington Road. On the 28th ult she had been sewing all day on board, whilst her husband had been drinking all day.' The children bad been out, but they, generally came in to eleep in the evenirg. Her mother had been staying on board for some time, but she left that day. At ten or hvlf past ten at night complainant was in tho cabin, when her husband came in end had a quarrel witi her mother, and in which ehe (complainant) did not interfere. He afterwards came to where com. pjainont was, and said "your mother has left, acd you had better go now." She retaliated that the bars were hers, complained of his spend ing the proceeds instead of paying his debts, and of his having introduced two women cf ilifame into the vessel. He then {truck her, knocked her head against the floor, and holding both hands to bel lllck forced her head back, and placed his kiipes alternately on her back aid neck, nearly strangling her. Her neck was much swollen in coneequetcp. Ultimately he let her go on con-1 ,i;ldc-ration that she would leave the bar to him He, liowever, started out first, when she sprang to the door and locked herself in, and remained therr- until morning. She had since carried on the business until the 5'h of August, giving de- fendant the takings, but not living with him. On that day he ordered her off the boat, and she went. Mr Morgan then put in letters from def-ndant to him, in which lie praotically ad- mitted the assault but pleaded justification- Cross-examined Complainant denied being a violent woman, but she had wilfully broken an ornament because defendant had prohibited her daughter touching it. Sfce majntaioed that the bars were berp, as it was she who" got the situation" although her husband WIIS tenant and the bills were made out in his name. Her husband was drunk on that day, but she was not in the habit of getting intoxicated. Did not tell her husband you can take your d- children, and I shall take mine." She did not break a lamp and sweep the supper things off the table in her temper. On the question cf mamtainancp, defendant said that on the 5th of Augu-t she had not left voluntarily, but had been driven from off the vessel by her husband. The captain only said 11 you had better leave the bar." Complunant refused to give up the keys to her husband, but handed them to the owner on shore. Be-examined ::Sbe was in fear of her life, as her husband had tried to murder her, not being content with inflicting one blow. Her husband made £10 a week profit, or he should make it. Sink holiday was a good { day, but Sundays were the best (Laughter). Maggie Cooper, the little daughter of com- plainant gave some evidence of the assault; and ) Bobeit Mawcroft, lately a 3cok on board the vessel, Mrs Neal's brother, tendered some testimony. Under cross-examination this witness said he had left on the previous Friday owing to a bother with his brother-in-law. It was true he had assaulted Neal, aud given him a black-eye, but it was ia self-defence. Mc Qamlin for the defence spoke of the violence of Mrs Neal's temper, which brought about frequent quarrels, and of which and her dr:nking 13abits her husband alleged he bad cause to complain. Ou the 28 h his client was hard at work all day, and at abuut eix o'clock he asked his wife to accompany him into the town; but ehe refused. 10 the evening she wanted to send the children off the vessel, else she wouid murder them. His client admitted having then committed a technical assault, by nutting his arms around her neck, in order to keep her there, end prevent her murderiDg his children, which were taken care of by a seaman called Don, and one of whirh found shelter on board behind the ship's funnel, beirg locked out all night. His client said he had done all he onuld to live peaceably with the woman; but she was of such violert disposition that it made matters very difficult. He wap, however, quite willing to take her back, on her apolog'zing for what bad happened and giving ao undeN t iking thftt she would conduct herself better in the future; although be was afraid she was rather too proud to do t at. Mr Gamhn concluded by arguing that reasonable battery in defence of a parent or child was justifiable and in this case the man behaved his children would be murdere". William Kif (Don) was then cal ed. When he went on board, between 11 and 12 o'clock, he beard the children crying for the captain, and when he went into the saloon, which was in darkness, and heard complainant say D-- your eyes, let me go." He then put the four children on cushions in the top saloon, and afterwards saw them coming out, Mra Neale's being kfpt in. He pet those three in bis own bed, and stayed on deck himself. Never said the complainant, and defendant was sober when witness had Jast seen him. Crcs,-examined He hi\d never seen Mrs Neal druuk or violent. She did on the follow- ing morr ing complain cf her husband's conduct. Heater Maud Alice Neal, the defendant's daughter also gave evidence, and who denied that her father had struck the complainant. Subsfquently the magistrates recaUed both girls and after giving the caee careful con. sider ition decided to dismiss the summons as the evidence w-q so contradictory.

Advertising

AN APPEAL FOR THE OLD CEMETERY.

[No title]

Advertising

ItOBBED OF A CRIME;