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JOTTINGS.

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JOTTINGS. One of the most important gatherings held in Rhyl for some time past wns that which nearly filled the town hall on Saturday last. This was an assembly of educationists-not theorists and faddistsâbut persons who are engaged in directing and carrying on the actual work itself. The occasion was that of the delivering of an address by H.M.I, of Schools for this District on the a-' yet imperfectly understood new code shortly to come into operation. That the explanation was a lucid one can be seen by those sufficiently interestedt in the subject to read the lengthy ipport of Mr Morgan Owen's speech to be found in other columns, and of the companv's appreciation of the exposition ample public and private testimony has been given. Sir Theodore Martin also gave some excellent words of advice in regard to what might be termed practical education, and the teachers and parents who heard them would do well to act upon the counsel given in their bring- ing up of young children. The Rliyl elementary schools will reopen on Monday next. After the lengthy holiday of six weeks' duration no difficulty should be experienced in getting a fairly good attendance on the reopen- ing. It is well-known that the experience of managers and teachers is the reverse of being satisfactory in this matter; but a little more vigour displayed by the local committee might bring about an improvement. The committee meetings are not held often, but the attendance of some of the members at these long intervals points to the necessity for an infusion of new blood." A copy has been received of the charge to the churchwardens deliverd by the Archdeacon of St. Asaph in the early part of the summer, and which is now printed by Longmans, Green & Co. in a neat book form. At the end is appended a list of authorities consulted by the Archdeacon before formulating this charge, one of the most practical as a lucid exposition of their duties and responsi. bilities, ever delivered to the churchwardens of any diocese. We observe that a new feature has been introduced into the last number of the Arch deacon's Diocesan Sheet. This consis's of a list of Welsh-speaking clergy ministering in England. The names and addresses of a score of such persons are inserted, and doubtless the list in future numbers will be greatly extended. The Dean of St. Asaph has penned an argu- mentative letter on the tithe campaign, nnd has very pointedly appealed to the Calvinistic Methodist assembly which assembled tli;s week at Carnarvon to repudiate the disgraceful scenes which occur so frequently at tithe sales. Hitherto the preachers have by their silence given tacit approval to some of the most disreputable episodes which have disgraced the annals of modern history whilst the Welsh Press, conducted mainly by preachers, has magnified rioters into heroes and giv«nits most unqualified sanction to rowdyism of the basest character, and dishonest tricks that up to two or three years ago the Welsh as a nation would have been ashamed to be identified with. People residing in towns can have but a very faint notin of the boycotting, intimidation and persecution carried on in many of the country parishes where the tithe agitation is rampant. But that it does exist, can be testified to by scores of Churchmen and Nonconformisis in the Vale of Clwyd. All the caricaturing of religion which goes on now, in the form of ministers' effigies, mock celebratior s of the sacrament, and the con- npctmg of solemn woids of the scriptures with acts which are strongly condemmed in holy writ, is likely to have an effect, reaching in effect far beyond that of harrasing one religious b-Jdy in Wales. The fact is that the country is day by day becoming more irreligious and ungodly. Even a Dissenting and Radical paper, published at Carnarvon, had to admit some little time ago, that ihere were now more persons absenting them- selves f i on-i places of worship m Wales than has ever before bren the case. The people who are dri ting away from the old morrings, and abandon- ing the precepts of early Methodism, are just now confining their objectionable attention to the parsons but the preachers' day also is to come, and we cannot expect that they will be better able to withstand the onslaught. It is well known that it was the distinguished literateur Sir Theodore Martin, K.C.B. who influenced Her Majesty the Queen to pay her auspicious visit to North Wales last summer. Sir Theodore being a gentleman who possesses great influence in high places, it was very pleasing to see him being driven by Mr Morgan Owen round our town on Saturday. Sir Theodore expressed himself delighted with the place, and who knows what good results may follow his brief sojourn at Rhyl. During four nights last week some young people, who had been digging holes in the sands, and adorning their sides with Japanese lanterns, &c., were the means of collecting, in small amounts, the sum of four guineas from people looking at the show." This money has been handed over into the treasury of the Royal Alex- andra Hospital. This means of obtaining fund* for that deserving institution is a commendable one, when accompanied by a guarantee that the money will be so applied. There are some people existing who cannot ap- probate the beauties of nature in any form, but who arc great on artificial "attractions." There are some who can see no beauty in the sands of Rhyl, and who never take a stroll over our sand- are some who can see no beauty in the sands of Rhyl, and who never take a stroll over our sand- banks. These gentlemen talk occasionally about levelling the banks, and converting the same into an artificial track of some character. If this course of action is adopted I do not think the town, as it is at present laid out at anyrate, will but have cause to greatly regret such a deformation. That the sandbanks, with their many knolls and dells, and general undulating feature, form a source of great attraction to the visitors is proved daily by the scores of persons who can there be met with, and these and many others would greatly regret any sandbank improvements." Many residents of Rhyl have possibly never noticed the round monnd or hill, commonly called Y Gop, situate near Newmarket and visible from Rhyl. This tumulus or cairn was supposed to cover the remains of Boadicea; but Professor Boyd Dawkins says that is impossible, though a (hieftain's memory may be perpetuated by it. The cairn's dimensions are 350 feet in one direction 250 in another, and 46 in height. In the vicinity a cave has been discovered containing human bones and pottery of the bronze age. Many of the skulls are long and belonged to the most ancient typo of Welsh folk, whilst some of the skulls are Celtic. The murclei of the feet were shewn to have been flattened, and could be used for grasping as tha hands are used. t-

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AN APPEAL FOR THE OLD CEMETERY.

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ItOBBED OF A CRIME;