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NORTH WALES RAILWAY.

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HOUSE OF COMMONS.—THURSDAY,…

JSUB-DIVISION OF POPULOUS…

,IRISH POOR LAW. '

HOUSE OF COMMONS.—FRIDAY,…

,POOR-LAWS (IRELAND.)

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POOR-LAWS (IRELAND.) Lotrl J. RUSSELL then ruse to move the adoption ofa rate in aid, of 6d. in the pound, for the next two years, and proceeded to state 'he reasons which urged the Government to adopt the present course. He had pointed out the expediency of appointing a select committee at the beginning of the session, in order to suggest such alterations as would do away with the defects and evils at present existing. The committee had decided that a maximum rate should be fixed, and the sum he proposed as the maximum was 5s. in the pound, which would entitle the electoral district to an auxiliary relief of 2s. in the pound from the union. At some future day it was proposed to introduce a provision by which, when improve- ments were made upon the land, no increased valuation should tak^ place for a period of from seven to ten years. Another ques- 1 ion was the area of taxation which some persons thought ought to Oe much more limited, as it would induce the land-holders to give employment to the labourers on their property, and avoid a con- tribution to the general taxation. He feared, however, that many and serious evils would endeavour to get rid of their paupers and drive them into the towns, which were already over-crowded. At the same time the question was one on which the committee would exercise its best discretion and judgment. Another point was the subjecting the family charges upon property to the payment of poor rate, but that was a matter which would he more fully dis- cussed hereafter. He thought it would tend vary much to the re- cultivation of lanos that had been for some time unoccupied, if, ior once, the rates due upon them were remit ed, and that he pro- posed to submit to the consideration. It appeared that by a report of 11te'Poor-law Commissioners, that of 131 unions in Ireland, 20 required ex-;ernal aid, and were unable to maintain their own poor. ke .question was whether Parliament, would continue to make further advances to meet the results of the late famine, or adopt plan now propo.-ed by the Government. He referred to the large sums that had been advanced during the last three years for reproductive labour in Ireland, amounting in the whole to a sum vf £ 3,193,00J, and contended that, the amount paid iu the shape of poor- rates, on the average, by the various counties in Ireland not exceeding Qs. or 3s, in the pound, they could not be considered ruined or unable to pay this additional sixpenny rate in aid. H, then pointed out the number of taxes (to the amount of £ 12,000,000) levied in England from which Ireland was exempted, and ob- served that the latter country would never consent to be placed upon an equalitj with England in that respect. Mr. STAFFORD condemned the policy generally pursued by this country towards Ireland, and entirely disapproved of the present proposition, and should feel it his duty to resist it in every stage. He complained that the people of Ireland had never been offered the alternative of being placed, with regard to taxation, on an equality with England. Mr. JOHV O'CONNELL suggested the appropriation of a portion of the income of the Established Church, and a tax upon absentees, as a better means of meeting the deficiency than that proposed by the Government. Lord BERNARD recommended the Government to alter its entire policy towards Ireland. He objected to a rate in aid as being likely to lead to very dangerous results, as well as being extremely difficult to levy, and recommended a development of the indus- trial resources of the country. Mr. BANKES would give his decided opposition to the Govern- ment proposition, which could not be carried out, som persons saying that they would not pay it, and others that they could not. He was willing to give any just assistance in his power to Ireland, as she had suffered by the repeal of the Corn-laws. Tha CHANCELLOR of the EXCHEQUF.II briefly recapitulated the arguments of Lord John Russell, and contended that there were no other means by which the deficiency in the rates could be sup- plied, and without it the lives of many thousand poor people must be inevitably sacrificed. On the motion of Mr. OSBORNE, the debate was adjourned, and The Out-Door Paupers Bill was then read a third time and passed. The Petty Sessions Bill went through committee. Adjourned at one o'clock.

HOUSE OF LORDS.—MONDAY,…

HOUSE OF COMMONS.—MONDAY,…

THE BURDENS ON LAND.

COMMITTEE ON POOR LAWS, IRELAND.

HOUSE OF COMMONS.—TUESDAY,…

WAR IN INDIA—APPOINTMENT…

REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS.