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NORTH WALES RAILWAY.

[No title]

HOUSE OF COMMONS.—THURSDAY,…

JSUB-DIVISION OF POPULOUS…

,IRISH POOR LAW. '

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IRISH POOR LAW. Lord J. RUSSELL then rose, and moved that the House resolve itself into a committee of the whole House upon the Irish Poor- law. Mr,,S. CRAWFORD moved, as an amendment, that it is un- constitutional and unjust to impose on Ireland separate national taxation for the wants of particular localities, so long as the public general revenue of Ireland is paid into an imperial treasury, and placed at the disposal of an imperial legislature for the general purposes of the United Kingdom." The House then divided, and the numbers wereâ 15 Against it 139-12-1 The Speaker s leaving the chair was then opposed by Sir John WALSH, who contended that, after the appointment of a commit- tee, the bringing down to the House a cut and dried resolution, without evidence, before that committee had completed its in- quiries, was a violation of the practice of Parliament and of the spirit of the Constitution. He insisted that a rede in aid of 6d., which was vicious in principle, and had already created a flame throughout Ireland, was utterly inadequate; that it would oppress the occupying tenantry of Ulster and Leinster and that whilst the Poor Law remained as it was, engulfing all property, any paftial relief would be thrown away. He expounded what he considered a sounder poticy, and said he should divide the House upon the principle of this particular rate. Mr., NAPIER ridiculed this substitute for the comprehensive measures promised by the Government. Mr.-DisRALi, after justifying his vote against Mr. Crawford's motion, observed that this vote did not preclude him from opposing the vacation of the chair to go into committee to sanction a scheme of the Government which had not been explained. Where was the evidence in support of the policy of the Ministers ? Why was haste required here, when the House of Lords would move deli- berately? If the Government had brought forward comprehen- sive, business-like measures, they might have asked for temporary ones but Ministers were trifling with their reputation. Lord J. HUSSELL observed that, according to the forms of the House, he could propose the resolution only in committee, and he retorted upon Mr. Disraeli that in demanding delay he was trifling with the welfare of Ireland. He complained of a want of candour on the part of Mr, Napier and Sir J. Walsh, and briefly pointed out the insuffielcncy of the remedies they proposed, of circum- scribing the area of taxation, aud of emigration, and the mischiefs which would attend a property rating. Mr. PRYSE PRYSB rose to address the House with a highly or- 'namented leek stuck in his breast, and was received with general -applause. He complained, that whilst England, Ireland, and Scotland were represented in the Irish Poor Law Committee, no Wei.simian had been admitted into it (cheers and laughter). Altera stormy discussion, in which a large number of members took part, The House dividedâ For going into committee 195 Against it 9t>â99 The House adjourned at half-past one.

HOUSE OF COMMONS.—FRIDAY,…

,POOR-LAWS (IRELAND.)

HOUSE OF LORDS.—MONDAY,…

HOUSE OF COMMONS.—MONDAY,…

THE BURDENS ON LAND.

COMMITTEE ON POOR LAWS, IRELAND.

HOUSE OF COMMONS.—TUESDAY,…

WAR IN INDIA—APPOINTMENT…

REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS.