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- W 0 1. S E Y, THE CARDINAL-CHANCELLOR…

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- W 0 1. S E Y, THE CARDINAL-CHANCELLOR…

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P" The pT3ce was we![ sufted to repose. and it is on 1, record that aH the Archbishops of York 1 esorted t tbitbf'r when their presence was not required in that citv." BoJJinNbed savs: "At is a ca5rell belonging to the Archbishop of Yorke, where ho usotb ott to he whfn he .-efrpc<hptb. bimsetf wt'h change of aire and shift ct habitation for the avoiding of such infection as may otherwiHe ingcndpr by his long &bode in one place, for w&nt of due purgation and airing of his house.' It is known tha.t Wolsey 'was fond of retirement and found great recuperative iaOucHce in repose. He frequently deaied personages of importaBce KudienXM at Hamptou Coutt. and went thither when suffering from the sweating sic :nesa," supposed to have, been contracted by hica white presiding in his Court. In consequence of his avocations in London," Mr. Law remarks, "and his business with the King, and especially the negotiations that followed on the death of the Emperor, for which dignity Henry had been a candidate. Wolsey did not visit Hampton Court between the year 1517 and 1520. But he oc- casionally went down there to spend a few r;ays of teat and quiet in the country air. and would give rder. that he was not to be troubled with business until he camd back to town." It is easy therefore to understand how acceptable the quiet of Cawood muat hay be(-t to him. Alton, le confidential agent of the Ear!, of Shrews- bury, Lord Steward of the Royal Household, om- plains bitter!y of the difficulty he had in obta-mug answers to letters or an interview. "Hethfttsba.H be a suitor to him," observes Alien, must baTe no other business but to attend upon his pleasure. To get him to attend when he does not choose nust be a wiser man than I am He adds that be hat heard oa another occasion, when importuned by someone on a matter of business, the Cardinal reptied, I ye be not content to tarry my leisure, depart when/e will." And Alien further declares that, he would rtther be commanded to Rome, than deliver letters to Jim and wait for an answer. When he walks in thepark he I will suffer no suitor to come nigh unto bm; but orders him away as far as a man will aioot an arrow." This course of action, however, is said to have been due to the sickness from which he suff&ed, and was not uncommonly imitated by other pe-sons of distinction and authority when the plagte was <agiDg. John Skelton, who took infinite deught in .tiril!ling SM Cardinal, refers to this demeanour: His countenance 1ike a My Jord is not at layser Sir you must tarry a stoutid Till better layser be found Sir we must dance attendaunce And take patient auifera.nce For my lorde's grace Has now no time nor place To speak with you &s yet, And so they may sit or flit, Sit. or walk, or ride, And his layser abide; Perch aunce, wait a. vere, And yet be never the Wolsey also commonly held to his note tn orange whereof the meat or substance was taken out, and 6Hed up again with part of a sponge, wherein was vinegar and other confections against pestilent airs." Mr. Brewer is of opinion that his haughty conduct was due to the impatience of a man of g'eat peno- Cont:r!M!CLiune"9 a.<thH interrupttons. i0.llicp' and ceited mediocrity or pprtma.cious self-icterest. By nature, however, tit" Cardinal was "atun<Hy coa- sidera.te man." Sb&kespesre makes Griffith aitv of him to Queen Kathenne tb&the was Lofty sour to that Joved him Dot, Ent to those lllel1 tha,t hinl as öllltlnlcr." It mu&t have bppn in this iatter chara.ctembat he was best known at Cawood. AKhough Suftering from dropsy and stoBe, ague, quinsey, and colic," the Cardinal won the stft'ection. of his 'clergv, and wa< highly esteemed by them. Be, was so ill that he bs.a been coTMpeHed to obt;?UH a dispsasation from the Pope for the Lenten observance. 4rid in a letter to Hf-nry tha Eighth, rem.M-ks that his diges- tion ha.d been so impaired a,s tha.t he collli on!y ea.t tpuder food. When settled down at Cwood it is recorded of him Khnd. bo emp:oyed himstif by doing deeds of charity," a.nd was speoi&Hy "kiad to the poor." It was white rpsfdtng at the cast!e tha.t! Wo!sey made arrangements for be)Dg !nsta.t!.ed Archbishop, "a ceremony which ha.ct. been postponed on kccount of the mujtlfarí()u, du'dca which previously preveuted him coming into hiR dioceae. The iI13ta.U¡;¡,tí°tl. bow- ever, never took pJa.co, a.lthlJ\Jgh the ofKcisi!! of the tathedral visited nim at Cawood, and urged upon him the necessity of its performacce, representing to him at the same time the loss bis dignity would suffer, should he happen to die before being en- throned." It will not be forgotten that Henry, atteoaed by Catherine Howard, whom he b&d recently m&r)r'ed, I visited Cawood, and as Mr. Wheater reminds us, it was in the h&!Js of Pontefract and Cawood that the King drank joy from lips prostituted to Mother." The sunny smile in which he delighted so much to bask was the treacherous fascination of a lewd and impure woman. It was not surprising, under &)! the ¡ circumstances of the case-infamOl1!1 as had been 100 monarch's own conduct-that, whea the taTe of her j base intrigues ia those places was unfolded to his astonished ears, "tha bewildered husband spurned the wretched woman on whom he had doated vvith all the exquisite fondness of his sensual natuM." When Wolsey fell the glory of Cawood departed. Edward Lee, the Cardinal's successor in the See of York, converted the castle iato a prison for the recep- t tion of captives taken at the battle of Solvvay Moss. During the Civil Wars the place was destroyed. The tenor bell in Cawood Church is a pro-Reformation beti, bearing the legend Sancte Andree, ora pro Mo&M, and the tradition is that it was brought from the castle chapel wrecked in 1646. Be this as it inay, little else remains to attest the grandeur of the Arch- bishops' home. But to return to the Cardinal's f journeyâcom- menced by the way in Passion Week-it will susice to notice briefly that be lodged for the nrst night at Hendon, in the house of the Abbot of Westtnicster, the next day removing to & place called Bye, &n abode of the Lady Parry." On the third night be elept in the monastery at Royston, and was vety ill; oo the fourth day he reached Huntingdon, and remained at the Abbey. On Patm Sunday, Cavendish recorda that his master, being still sick and teeble, reached the Abbey of Peterborough, which he raade his abode until the Thursday in Easter week, hift train for the most part being at board wages in the town." Hera it was that the fallen Cardinal celebrated Palm Sunday, going with the monks in processions and bearing his palm with great humility." On the ? ThuMday he kept hja Maanday, witj:1 accustomed

- W 0 1. S E Y, THE CARDINAL-CHANCELLOR…