Hide Articles List

8 articles on this Page

... __------Aberdare District…

Abet-aman Institute.

News
Cite
Share

Abet-aman Institute. Grand Opening Cenemonyi On Monday 1 dot the event, which had been truly announced as the "greatest event in the history of oberam In" came off amidst great rejoicing on the part of the villagers. Flags and bunting were displayed from cottages and shops alike. At 3.0 p.m. a huge procession, headed by the Aberaman and Cwmanual Silver Bends, and including the Ambulance Bri- gade, marched from Victoria Square, Aberdare, to the Aberaman Institute. In a carriage rode Messrs. D. A. Thomas, M.P., Keir Hardie, M.P., W. Thomas, High Constable, and C. B. Stanton, iniiiers' agent. The Institute having been reached, Mr. T. Roderick (Messrs. J. Morgan and Soli, Aberdare, Ltd.) handed to Mr. Keir Hardie a gold key, suitably inscribed, to open the main door of the huge building. Mr. T. Roderick, the architect of the building, was also present. Mr. Keir Har.die, Having been intro- duced to the audience "by Councillor T. Bowen, congratulated Aberaman on the fine building it had erected; also the committee who had worked so hard, and especially the energetic secretary, Mr. W. W. Price, on their triumphant suc- cess. Three cheers to the committee having been given at the request of Mi Keir Hardie, that gentleman turned the key and opened the building. After- wards the various rooms were inspected by the distinguished visitors. At a crowded public meeting held sub- sequently in the Hall the building was crammed. In addition to committeemen and officers there were present on the platform Mrs. Illtyd Hopkins, Miss Hop- kins, Miss Harris, Mr. J. Stubbs, repre- senting the 'Patent Victoria Stone Co., who supplied the frontage stone for the Institute, and Mr. Watkin Williams, Cardiff, formerly of Aberaman. Councillor T. Bowen, who presided, said that this event was the happiest in- cident of his life. They had their two Members of Parliament present, and they were pleased to see Mr. D. A. Thomas sufficiently recovered to take part in the proceedings. Some complained that some of the roonjs were not large enough, but they had.,done their best with the limited space at their disposal. The committee had done their utmost to cater for all classes and conditions of people in the way of providing recreation, physical exercise, and means of attaining know- ledge. The committee had had an untir- ing secretary in Mr. Price. He hoped that the Institute would be the means of advancing the populaceâphysically, mor- ally, and intellectually. A duet, "Mae Cymru'n barod ar y wys," was sung by the veterans, Gwyn- alaw and Mr. John Lake, who were loud- ly encored. Later on Mr. Lake gave a solo. Mr. D. A. Thomas, who was given a hearty reception, acknowledged the many messages of sympathy which he had re- ceived during his recent illness, which illness kept him away so long from his Parliamentary duties. Fortunately they had in Mr. Keir Hardie. his colleague, a man who was able to do the work of two men. (Hear, hear.) He was proud of his colleague in the House of Commons, and his constituents had reason to be proud of him. They wanted more men cf sincerity, grit and consistency in the House of Commons. It was not a sacri- fice but a pleasure for him (Mr. Thomas) to be present that day. At this juncture a presentation was made to Mr. W. W. Price, the secretary. It took the form of a very beautiful illuminated address, the text of which was composed by Mr. James Phillips, who -also read the address. Councillor Illtyd Hopkins paid an eulogistic tribute to Mr. Price, with whose name they also wished to couple the. name of Mrs. Price. Mr. Phillips thereupon handed the address to the recipient. Mr. Price, in returning thanks for the recognition conferred upon him, reviewed the progress of the movement which had culminated in the erection of that mag- nificent building. The committee, con- stituted as it was of men of various views m politics and theology, had worked in perfect harmony, and with in- domitable activity. Mr. Price there- upon gave a list of the chief subscribers. On behalf of himself and his wife, Mr. Price warmly thanked the committee for their recognition of their labours. 1\,{"" f"( T"') 1"'4 L'i F. v,. ij. Stanton, wno was received with a wild outburst of cheers, said that that Institute was a splendid example of what collective effo "t could do. He hoped the time would come when every village would possess a similar institute, where among other things the drama would be given its pro tier place. In spite of all local prejudice, the drama was as powerful a factor in improving the world as sermons were. Mr. Stanton dwelt on the utility of the Bat lis, and especially the provisions made for footballers. He hoped that the Institute would result in making Aberaman a better and a sweeter place. Mr. Keir Hardie was also the recipient of unbounded applause when he got up to speak. He dwelt on the benefits of the library, hall, and institute, and re- marked that his ideal institute was a place where the working man could come in their working clothes to have a bath, and where the womenâwho would soon become the "masters" of the menâcould gather together to gossip and work. (Laughter.) He concluded with a fervid appeal to the young people to make the best use of that grand institute. Councillor W. Thomas, who wore his chain of office as High Constable, ad- dressed the meeting very briefly. The address given to Mr. Price was executed by Messrs. T. Howell and Son, and is of pretty design. It includes the portraits of both Mr. and Mrs. Price, and also sketches of both the old and the new Institutes. Appended is the text of the a,Odi ess: a Address Presented to Mr. W. W. Price, Bryn Cottage, Aberaman, bv the Con- tributors to the Aberaman Hall, Library, and Institute Funds. Respected Sir,â We, the undersigned, acting upon the instructions of the aforesaid contributors in general meeting assembled, desire to place on record our very high appreci- ation of the valuable services rendered by you as hon. secretary to the above movement. For a period of six years your untiring devotion, your unremitting zeal, and contagious enthusiasm in the face of apparently insurmountable obsta- cles, have been most exemplary, and have earned for you the unqualified admir- ation of the public in general. As your colleagues in the management of this movement, we greatly rejoice in the unanimity with which the public acceded to our suggestion to thus recog- nise your services, as well as your unani- mous appointment as general eecretary in future. As your fellow-townsmen who have known you from infancy, we cannot but feel proud of your efforts in the ele- vation of your native place intellectually, morally, and socially. We would also recognise the valuable assistance you must have received from your good wife, realising as we do the numerous and manifold enquiries and messages that are inevitably associated with a movement of this magnitude. In conclusion, we respectfully ask your acceptance of this address, together with a cheque value £10, as "a slight recogni- tion of your services to us and to the rising generation of Aberaman and dis- trict. Wishing you and vours a long life of usefulness in the service of God and man, we remain, respected sir, yours in the bonds of service, Jas. Phillips (chairman), Evan Jones (vice-chairman), J. H. Powell (treasurer), Illtyd Hopkins. D.C., Tom Bowen, D.C." THE HISTORY OF THE MOVEMENT. On September 30th 1902, at the instance of the miners working at the A he aman colliery, a meeting wash ld to consider the offer of Mr. Andrew Carnegie, received through Mr. D. A. Thomas, M.P.. tu sub- scribe £ 1000 towards the erection of a library. Mr. Edward Mowells acted HS the secretary of I hat meeting. A committee consisting of eleven members WilS elected, and a resolution moved by Mr. W.W. Price the present secret ry. was ado< ted in'favo. r of the erection of a public hall library. A difficulty aruse in obtaining the gift from -I Mr. Carnegie, owing to his restriction pre venung them from budding m'o e than a library. Despite the efforts of our senior member to obtain a concession, all efforts proved unavailing, and it was eventually decided to reject Mr. Carnegie's offer. The Commit'ee succeeded in obtaining the pre- sent freehold site from ( aptaiii Roberts for the sum of ±'100. The Powell Duffrvn Co. were paid £ 3>s0 for the prope tv then in existence on the site. In i903 Mr. Edward Howells resigned the secretaryship, and Mr W. W. Price was appointed j, his stead. Within a short time a portion of the old Aberaman Institute was taken over, and worked as a free librarv. Later the whole of the Institute, including .the billiard table, -ames, etc., was taken up. At the first meeting of the committee proper Mr. John Howell, Greenhid, was asked to pre- side, and he continued in the capacity of chairman until he resigned last year. After negotiations with the local jolnern-s' com- mittees and with the Cwmaman Public Hall Committee, they were enabled to col- lect contributions from the miners at the ] eigh bouring collieries. It is understood that when the Lewis street branch of the Cwmarnan Li rary will be closed, a dona- ) tion will be given by the Ovvmaman com- mittee towards the Abe aman Ins-itute, in return for the generous support. given by the people of Aberaman towards the Cwm- arnayi Hall. In the year 1904, the trustees for the New Abf-raman Hall and Institute were ap- pointed, nine representing the focal col- -lieries, and four representing the outside public. The latler four ale lior John Howell, Mr. J. H. Powell, Mr. Benjamin Jones and Mr. Evan Jones. Nantgvvawr House. The c-dlit-ry representatives are Councillor Illtyd Hopkins, Messrs. William Brown Jones, John Paltrier, Augustus Davies, John Lee, John Williams, James Elton, Harr\ Cook and J. Hawke.. In April, 19of), Mr. James Phillips, Plea- sant View, the vice chairman, succeeded to the chair, and Mr. Evnn Jones, Nantgwawr Ho"se, was elected to the vice-chair. About three weeks ago Mr. Phillips resigned, and Councillor Tom Bowen was elected to the chair. In addition to the officers and trustees alreadv mentioned, the present committee is constituted of the following a tive members: Rev. Morgan Powell, B.A., vicar of Aberaman; Rev. H. P. Jen- kins, Saron; Messrs. Ben Stephens, William Collier, Wi-liam Williams, Morgan Thomas, Ben Evans, A Kedward, Lewis Gongh, T. Evans, T. J. Evans, Christmas Williams, Rees George, J. Thomas, loan Jones, Thomas Job Davies. David Williams, William John Beynon, E. Griffin, William Bad ham, John Henry Knight, John Rean, Edward Howellsand David J. Phillips, also the members of Wards Nos. 4 and 5 of the Aberdare District Council. Among those who attended the com- mittees in the early stages of the move- ment, are Messrs. Thos. Ellis, W. A. Davies, John Williams (Elm Grove), Morgan Parr, ex-Inspector Join Evans, John Davies (attendance officer), John James (now of Crvnant), E. Be van, R. W. Rober s, Griffith Badham, Wm. Williams, Robert Phillips, Henry Williams, David Evans, Mr Per- kins, C. A. Pullen, and W. J. Cummings. '< In October, 1907, the foundation-stone laying ceremony took place. DESCRIPTION OF THE INSTITUTE. The wtole building, consisting of the basement, ground floor, and Public Hall on the floor above, covers an area of 101 feet long and 59 feet wide. The contract, which amounts approximately to Xio,ooo has been carried out by Messrs John Mor- gan & Son (Aberdare'), Ltd., the architect being Mr T. Roderick. The committee have been materially helped in getting the work through by their appointment of a most, capable clerk of the'works, in the per- son of Mr E. R. Evans, Gadlya. He has had 20 years, experience in the erection of public buildings. Coming to the inner details of the build- ing, the particulars respecting the Public Hall, now known as the Grand Theatre, are well-known to all. The theatre, which has a fine spacious stage, and well ar ranged dressing rooms, can give comfort- able seating accommodation to 1,600 per- sons. There is no cause for scrambling upon chairs in order to see. In the agree- ment with the Lessees, The Welsh Halls, Ltd., reservation has been made bv the local committee for the use of the hall on occasions for lectures, and performances by local societies. On the ground floor a large room is reser- ved for the library, capable of stocking thousands of volumes, arranged in proper literary order. Close by is the News room, fitted with stands for newspapers all round the sides, and tables for magazines, etc., in

Advertising

Advertising

Advertising

Trecynon.

Aberdare.

Abet-aman Institute.