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THE ACCIDENTIN A MANCHESTER…

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IUIONDDA DlSTHICT OF MINEHS.

THE BAPTIST UNION.-

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THE BAPTIST UNION. MEETINGS IN LONDON. LONDOS, Wednesday.âThe formal business of the autumnal session of the Baptist Union of Great Britain and Ireland was commenced at Blooms bury Chapel, this morning, in the presence of a large and influential assembly. After a devotional service, conducted by the Rev. J. T. WIGNER, The Rev. F. TBESTBAIL, D.D.. F.R.G.S., of Newport, (Isle of Wight) delivered Llw- vewiden. tial address, upon "The Moral Tendency and Influence of Infidelity." He remarked that sym- pathy with doubting minds, who are i-erplexed with the profound and solemn verities of revela- tion, the wonderful discoveries of modern science, and the use which has been made of them, has be- come excessive, until to doubt is deemed an indi. cation of superior intelligence and independence of mind. It might, however, fairly be questioned whether scepticism, in the proper sense of the term, is so prevalent as is generally supposed. ( Speaking of the iufluence of intidelity, he said if a doctrine be morally bad in its effect, however ably it might be supported, it could not be true. The philosophy at present possessed by those who denied the existence of a Supreme Being, and the arguments by which they endeavoured to main- tain their views, were by no means new or original, but could be traced back to very remote times. Past experience had proved that infidelity was a soil barren of those virtues w. ich great events called forth, and which demanded the sut render of ti.e dearest interests and prospects of life, an i often of life itself. The three most eminent lawyers of the present day, who have successively adorned the woolsack, men accus- tomed to disentangle the most confused :in I intri- cate evidence, ,& well as to weigh probabilities, had been distinguished by their ardent attach- meilt to christian truth. He contended that intidelity degraded human nature. The material- ist must be a total stranger to the highest exer- cises of thought, and have a mean opinion of his own being, without freedom, a mere machine, having ve.y little purpose in the present life, and no idea of a future nobler life. Tile best answer to false teaching was t, e manly, bold, and loving i.tterance of the truths which gather around the pet son, the work, and the Jeatil of Christ; and a holy life on the jart of the members of the churches. The Rev. W. SAMPSON next read a paper upon Union Fuuds and Home Missio s," wiiich was followed by a conference introduced by The Rev. J. JTMKIN BKOWN, of Birmingham, who niove I a lesolution to the effect that the assembly places on record its conviction that home mission work was a duty devolved upon the churches by their Divine Lord. It rejoices that iil so many ways the churches are doing so much real work in this direction. The claims and needs of in .n}r portions of our country are, however, so great as to call lo-idlv for increased and united efforts. This assembly regrets the small support given to the British and Irish home mission. It earnestly urges upon the churches the necessity of incre;ised support, and pledges itself to do all in its power to help it. Baptists, remarked the speaker, free fro:n ecclesiastical tradition and rites, were upou a specially favourable platform, and had at present every opportunity for effi- ciently carrying out evangelistic work. This resolution was seconded by the Rev. J. P. CHOWS, and carried. The Rev. EDWARD SMART, of Hendon, sug- gested the value of lay agency. T e Rev. E. H. BROWN*, Twickenham, pointed out that there were 250,000 people in Ireland who spoke Irish, and did not know the English language, while 500,000 knew English very in. differently. Special means should, he thought, be adopted for reaching this class Mr .JAMES HARVEY rejoiced that the society seemed to be intending in future to be made a Christian enterprise ra'.her than a mere Baptist propaganda. The liev. Dr. LA.NDEIA believed that if the society could succeed in convincing the churches that it II as the best possible channel of accom- plishing home evangelisation work, its income would very soon be considerably multiplied. The Hev. CHARLES WILLIAMS said it was im- peratively necessary for the existence of the mis- sion that the richer country Baptist Associations should sustain it in funds, or it would be unable to reach the districts where at present Baptists were poor or there were none at all. Mr J. P. BACON mentioned that of £ 1,630 contributed to the funds, .London supplied one half. Mr W. OLNET thought it desirable to amalga- mate for the sake of the work of evangelisation, The report of the education fund showed an income of £:343, a considerable reduction on former years' receipts. In the afternoon the session resumed to receive the leport of the annuity fund, which was sub- mitted by the Hev, W. Sampson, and set forth that there were -now 420 beneficiary members, 233 of whom subscribe for their wives. There are 31 annuitants now receiving 1:45 a year, and 35 widows, 1:30. The income to the 3OLit beptember had reached £ 5,501, the beneficiary subscriptions amounting to 22,483. 111 the evening the Rev. Dr. Stanford preached a special sermon at Regent's Park Chapel, and two ^meetings in conuection with the Baptist Total Abstinence Association were held, besides a series of evangelistic services. A public meeting also took place at Maze Pond Cuapel, Air James Stiff presiding. Addresses were delivered by the Rev, Charles Williams, of Accrington the Rev. J. H. Atkinson, of Leicester and others. 1 The Rev. JAHKS OWEN, of Swansea, spoke upon the advantages of denominationalism, remarking that he had no love for the campstool Christian who was continually moving about, but had no settlement anywhere, and who had a love tor all sects in general, ibut for none in particular, and was so entirely unsectariau as to set about estab- lishing a new sect in himself. Although a cer- t-tin clergyman had said that there was DO hope of salvation for the Baptists, they had testimony to bear in the future still more than in the past. It was significant, and might appear surprising, that after, thanks to a Liberal Govern- ment, the Burials Bill had become law, they had still a good harvestâdespite all the Bishop of Lincoln's prophecies of war, pestilence, and famine, should such a measure be passed.

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