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THE WAR INI Z U L U L A N…

GREAT BRITISH VICTORY AT EKOWE.

THE NAVAL BRIGADE WITH COL.…

SURVIVORS OF THE 24TH REGIMENT.

OFFER OF SERVICE BY LORD STRATHNAIRN.

ITHE REV. OTTO WITT AT THE…

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THE REV. OTTO WITT AT THE COLONIAL OFFICE. On Friday Sir Idichael Hicks-Beach had an interview at the Colonial Office with the Bev. Otto Witt, of Rorke's Drift, a Swiss missionary. Tha following is ian account of the interview: The Secretary asked Mr. Witt bow the Zulus regarded their King, Cetywayo, whether, in fact, that ruler was liled ? Mr. Witt said that they did not like Cetywayo at all. The Secretary asked why, to which Mr Witt replied, because he was a tyrant of the worst kind, and no one was stfe under his rule any of his people were liable to be killed at any moment by him, or by those in his service. The ting invariably viewed all his subjects with suspicion who went to the mission to be taught, and those who did so were marked for death. Cetywayo got rid of those he disliked by accusing them of being anxious to learn from the missionaries the art of witch- craft. The secretary then said, Do yoit know, Mr. Witt, personally, if any Zulus were killed by Cetywayo's orders because they were anxious to learn from the whites P'' Yas.' said Mr. Witt, I do. I know of two per- sons who were killed on that account, and Umkwelantaba, the King's cousin, whom I have with me, was to have been killed half a year ago because he, too, was anxious to learn. Having received news that his life was to be taken, Umkwelantaba fled into Natal as a refugee, as many others have done, and came to me. Possibly an additional reason for their anxiety to dispose of him was because he was the King's cousin.' 'What are the feelings of the Natal Kaffirs, then, towards the white people ?: said the Secretary. Mr. Witt: ⢠Well, not over fondly. The colonists generally treat Kaffirs very badlyâjust as dogs. There- they felt themselves able to drive the wmte settlers out of the colony they would do so.r, first opportunity. The Secretary E know if the Natal Kaffirs might ft v,u^pected to join the Zulus to drive Witt thought they might join toâ¢* the Zulus, but, at the same time, the JNatal Kaffirs would not submit to the rule ol Present Zulu King, whom they would also be Rlad to get, rid of; and so would his OWD ^he Secretary That is -just the point 1 wish_to come to Do the Kaffirs like the Znhi ing more than the English Government â¢- xtt: ⦠No; because there are thousands of Zulu Kaffirs now in Natal who have runjaway from Zululand and Cetywayo's Governm At different times I h^e^nmyown ^use sk^tered Zulus who were to be k^ed had fled their country. Afterwards 1 not take such people in, because as 1 8tay There 1 was on the :,1th« ^mg, I thought I ought to o^eyhis^y. SirM. H. Beach: Yes, just so. Is tf1010 the? to be any rebellion in the Zulu ^^S^nst the King P' Mr. Witt:«It kfn expected for a long time that there would be a "b«u">n among the Zulus, because some of Jhem are friendly to the English and others are not. They have had frequent rows among them. selves. Last Christmas at one of these rows about 100 people were killed at the King's kraal.' The Secretary: 5 What would become of the Zulu country if the power is taken from them to govern it P Would they be likely of the Zulu country if the power is taken trom them to govern it P Would they be likely to become rebellious against the whites, and, if S3, what would be the best way of keeping them quiet ?' Mr, Witt: I think they would be rebellions, but if their guns and ammunition were taken from thpm altogether they would have no chance of ricii'g against the whites; that is, if at the tjjiue tin e all chance of their getting other t>uus and ammunition was also prevented. Tt-ey must then keep quiet.' Secretary Diu the introduction of gvilB into ZuiuUu i take piece through Natal tn* by way of dltfoa Bay ? Mr. Witt: 1 consider that they went in chitfiy by way of Algoa Bay.' The Sacra- Hirv ^'n ^now ^Je introduction of tjuiis' to ih6 hy Pf Alffoa B** has been now stopped t" Mr. Witt:' I I do not know.' The iSecretary: j Híive you ever been to Ekowe, Mr. Witt, or do you know anything about the place p' Mr. Witt: Yes, I koow Etchowe-or, us Mr. Witt pronounced it, Etchowaâpar- ticularly well, for I lived one whole year but 12 miles from it.' The Secretary What sort of country is it ? Is it very broken country, high above the sea, and hilly.' The Secre- tary: 1 Do you know anything of the country in front of where youlived at Rorke's Drift, further in Zululand ?' Mr. Witt: No, I do not; only that about my own station.' Tha Secretary: 'What kind of guns have the Zui'"8 moetly; arc they good or worthless P' Mr. -rltt: A large part of them have good guns, This fellow Umkwe. lantaba, wh^ I have with ice, told me to-day that he himself a breechloader^ which he left at heme.' The Socretary; j Where did the Zulus get theiJ" ammunition from P' Mr. Witt: From the safc^e parties that sold them the guts.'

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CONSTRUCTION OF A TELEGRAPH…

THE BRECON CORPORATION AND…

THE AFGHAN WAE. -

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---------THE BRITISH FLEET.

SNOWSTORM IN SCOTLAND.

MORE BAD WEATHER PREDICTED.'

THE ABERCARN COLLIERY.j -

STRIKE AT A RHONDDA VALLEY…

CURIOUS CASE OF SLANDER ,AT…

THE ROYAL MARRIAGE AT WINDSOR.

VISIT OF QUEEN VICTORIA TO…

THE PARIS EXHIBITION.

WILLS AND BEQUESTS.

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A NEW LIBERAL ASSOCIATION…

PRESENTATION

SINGULAR RAILWAY ACCIDENT.

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oun PARIS LETTER.

CA.MBRIDGE LOCAL KX A AG-NATIONS.

TRIAL TRIP OF A CARDIFF STEAMER.

-------------------THE DINAS…

THE SOUTH WALES FOOTBALL CHALLENGE…

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