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THE FIRE INSURANCE OFFICES…

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CAUTION TO THE -PUBLIC.

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WORCESTER AND HEREFORD.

ABERDARE.

ABERGAVENNY.

BRYNMAWR.,

CAERLEON.

CRUMLIN.

XjIiANSAINTFHAED.

THE QUEEN'S VISIT TO CHATHAM.

ARMY IN THE EAST.I

TRADE REPORT.

BRISTOL MARKET ROOM,

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We have at lengih to record some considerable arrivals 0f Australian gold. The White Star and Oliver Lang, both ^l0tQrnI J Ihilip, have arrived in St. George's Channel. The former has on freight 85,159 ounces of gold, and the latter 71,802 ouncesâmaking together 156,997 ounces, or about £628,000. In neither case are the dates from the colony later than those previously to hand. In- tellioence on Tuesday, of the arrival off Pen- zance of the ii-om Port Phillip, with the enormous nuantity of lo-^OOO ounces of gold on freight, worth }528,000,. and making a total of £ 1,156,000. Owing to the magnitude of these supplies, hopes are entertained that a considerable portion Will be sent into the Bank, but nothing definite can yet be stated OQ this point, as the gold will pot be in baud for several days, t. -f RAILWAY COMPANIES' RESPONSIBILITY.âIn the Li- verpool County Court, on Tuesday, judgment was given in the case of Wignall v. the London and North-Western Railway Company, in which a commercial traveller claimed £ 25, as compensation for the loss of a desk stolen from a carriage in the Lime-street station, where it had been placed by one of the company's porters, whilst plain- tiff was in the office. Three grounds of defence were taken that plaintiff not having booked when the desk was taken, no contract had been entered into, and there- fore the company were not responsible for the loss; that the desk was not "luggage" within the ordinary meaning of the Act of Parliament and that the order books and private papers in the desk, were writings" within the meaning of the Carriers' Act. His Honour decided that the first objection could not be sustained, as the company's servant had taken charge of plaintiff's luggage, and placed it in the carriage and as to the second and third objec- tions, that nothing could be more essentially luggage than a travelling desk, except, perhaps, articles of appa- rel required for the journey, and that order-books were absolutely necessary to commercial travellers, to carry on their business. He then gave plaintiff a verdict for £ 3 10s., the declared value of the desk, £ 2 10s. for the inconvenience arising from the loss of the crder-books, and Id. as the nominal value of the private pipers. He also allowed plaintiff his costs.â Uvcr^xtol Sta-nd.ird. Several changes in the Cabinet, which have been pre- viously indicated, have taken place. The Duke of Argyll has succeeded Lord Canning as Postmaster-General and Lord Harrowby, vacating the Vice-Chancellorship of the Duchy of Lancaster, will take the Duke of Argyll's sinecure place as Lord Privy Seal Mr. Baines, who re- tired from the Presidency cf the Poor Law Board at the end of the last session, becomes Chancellor of the Duchv, with a seat in the Cabinet and Lord Stanley, of Alder- ley, the President of the Board of Trade, has also been appointed a member of the Cabinet. The Tr.tes looks upon Mr. Baines as the representative of the middle classes in the Cabinet. THE VINE AT HAMPTON COURT.âHaving made the following note of the vine at Hampton Court, and of its parents at Valentines, on a recent visit to them, it may be useful in your utilitarian miscellany. The vine at Hampton Court is the largest in Europe, its branches extending over a space of 2,300 feet. It was planted from a slip in the year 1768, and generallv bears upwards of 2,000 bunches of grape of the black Hambro' k nd. The original vine from which this cutting was taken still flourishes in Essex, at the seat called Valentines, in the parish of Ilford, near TTanstead, where it was planted iu 1758. In 1835, it bore four cwt of grapes, and the <-tem girted 24 inches. In one season £ 300 was realised by the sale of its fruit.â \ofes and Queries. THE MOUNTGARRETT PEERAGE.âThe Gazette" of Tuesday, contains a notice that the Queen, taking into her Royal consideration that upon the decease of Edmuud, Earl of Kilkenny and Viscount Mountgarrett, without issue, in the month of July, 1846, the earldom of Kil- kenny became extinct, but the dignity of Viscount, Mount- garrett devolved upon Henry Edmund, now Viscount Mountgarrett, as eldest son and heir of the Hon. Henry Butler, has been graciously pleased to ordain that Anne Henrietta Butler, spinster; Julia Jeruima,wife of Thomas Clifton Wilkinson and Charlotte Butler, spinster, shall enjoy thejsame title and precedence as if their late father, the Hon. Henry Butler, had survived his brother, the said Edmund, Earl of Kilkenny and Viscount Mountgarrett, and had succeeded to the title of Viscount Mountgarrett. PROMOTION OF Sin EDMUND LYONS.We are happy to announce that her Majesty has been pleased to promote Rear-Admiral of the Red Sir Edmund Lyons, Bart, G.C.B., K.C.H., Comuiander-iu-fhief of the fleet in the Black Sea and Mediterranean waters, to the rank of Ad- miralof the Blue, the first exercise of the Royal preroga- tive in such matters since the new order in Council was adopted. CENTRAL CRIMINAL CoeRT. NOV. 29.âMURDER.â (Before the Chief Baron and Mr. Justice Erie.)âDaniel Lorden, 48, was indicted for the wilful murder of Cather- ine Lordan. Guiltyâdeath. THE NIGHTINGALE FeND â A public meeting was held yesterday at Willis's Rooms, St. James's, to give ex- pression to a general feeling "that the services of Miss Nightingale in the hospitals of the Eas: demand the grate- ful recognition of the English people." The attendanee was numerous and brilliant, and long before the hour fixed for commencing business there was not one seat unoccu- pied. The chair was taken by his Royal Highness the Duke of Cambridge, who arrived shortly after 2 o'clock, and experienced an enthussastic reception The object wili be eminently succeasfcll-indeed n .tioual. DISGRACEFUL AND WANTON OUTRAGE AT PARSONS- TOWN.âThe Dublin entrance to Parsonstown receives a very pleasing effect from the buildings forming the Roman Catholic Chapel, with the Convent of the^Sisters of Mercy, and their schools attached, all of which are executed in an elegant style of ecclesiastical architecture, of which all classes and creeds in the town and vicinity feel a consider- able degree of gratification. The entrance to the convent was crowned by a beautiful mediaeval cress in stone, which was very much admired, as well from its own merits as its suitability to the style of the buildings it ornamented. Uni- versal indignation was felt throughout the town on Thursday, when it became known that this admirably designed cross had been ruthlessly torn from the pi »ce where it had been fixed, and found broken on the highway. The ssnseless and malicious perpetrators of this abominable mischief must have used much force to effect it, since the cross itself was of considerable weight, and fastened to the keystone of the arch of the gatewny over which it stood, and which was also pulled down. The Protestant in- habitants feel outraged at the commission of this act. and will use every exertion to discover and punish the offenders. The general impression is that this scandal on the town was not the act of any inhabitant, but would rather appear to have been committed under the folly of drunken excitement, and not with any attention to display religious animosity or sectarian feeling.â Saunders,

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