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THE CRY -AT THE COMING ELECTIONS.

A POWERFUL MICROSCOPE.

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PHEASANTS.

! AUSTRALIA. !

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AUSTRALIA. GOLD FIELDS.âEXTRAORDINARY YIELD. Advices dated Melbourne, January 13th, 1852, have reached London by an unusually quick voyage, of only three months. The following is a copy of a letter, on the truthfulDess of the statements contained in which, full reliance may be placed. Melbourne, Jan. 13, 1852. The yields of our gold fields have been still more astonishijg sioce I last wrote to you. To enable you to form an idea, 5 will give you a statement of the quantity weekly received at the Treasury, in Melbourne, by the government escort, for the last seven weeks For the week ending 26th Nov., 13,169 ounces, 3rd Dec., 16669 I I Oth 26,656 â 11 17th 19,492 24th 10,851 â M 31st 10,634 â 7th Jan. 10.998 And the escort, to arrive to-day, will bring 15,035 ounces. As I mentioned before, what the escort brings is no criterion what- ever, and it has been estimated that it only forms one-third part of the whole. The shipments of gold up to 31st December, consisted of 144,825 ounces, which, at the very low valuation of f3 per ounce, gives .£43!,475 as the result of three months. But the above only forms a portion of the total exported, as it only shows the quantity taken on freight. There is no duty pay- able the only thing the master of the vessel has to do is to make a declaration of how much he has on board, to satisfy the govern* ment. Of course he cannot say what quantity the passengers have with them, and it is well-known that passengers, generally, do take away as much as they can bear with them. The Bril- liant, the Statesman, and Sarah Ann, 3 ships are departing new for London, all of which will take away a very large quantity; the two first certainly not less than 40,000 ounces each, and the last about 35,000 ounces. The ship Melbourne took away 60,586 ounces. Sailors are so scarce, that they are coolly asking .flOO for the run home. Common labourers get lOsa-day, fo« merely helping to load ships.' Frequently we have 1,000 souls landed in the 24 hours !rom South Australia. Even New South Wales, with all her gold fields, cannot retain her population, as* when the last steamer left Sydney, a few days ago, there were no fewer than 10 vessels filling up wi'h goods and passengers for Melbourne; and even this day (13th Jan.,) already there are no fewer than 238 pas engers. Adelaide, however, is suffering the most, as no gold has been found there as yet, and a few days; ago, nine ships arrived in one day from that port. "The price of gold is now firm at 60s* per ounce shortly after the first arrivals from the gold fields, it was 62s; but when the large quantities begun to pour in, the price fell to 56. 6d and 57s; but a number of fresh buyers has again raised it to 60s. Ihe freight to England is J per cent,, valuing it at £ 3 per ounce and commission oa buying and selling at 1 per cent. The quantity in the market is stillvery large, and fresh arrivals take place every day. Looking amlie quantities brought down by the escort, one would be led to believe that the quantity was falling off, but such is not the case, as the deficiency can bo easily accounted for, from the fact of the immense number of miners who had left the gold fields to spend their Christmas holidays in town, and who brought their own gold with them, instead of paying the J per cent, escort free. Numbers are still arriving, many having left on account of the scarcity of water during the hot weather, as well as the badness thereof, owing to its being so much disturbed with the continual washing of the gold. The city (Melbourne) has been very crowded in- deed, for the last month with diggers, who have been spending their money most freely, but great order and good conduct have prevailed. Shopkeepers and publicans have teen making a great deal of money." GOLD DUST. Should Everything that is gold, glitters," be used as a set off to the venerable adage which warneth us, All is not gold which glitters 1" There is certainly a great and universal fas. cination in the m)stic metal, from which few are able to preserve themselves; so the columns of news from the gold regions" is seldom unread. There is no lack of glitter in the last file of Australian papers. Every paragraph seems racy of the soil." We select a few "A miner lately weLt into Redfern's, the pastry cook, in Collins-street, and bought a few shillings' worth of confec- tionery; he threw down a five pound note, and declined to re- ceive any change." Women are driving water catts about Melbourne, tieij husbands having gone goid-hunting." "No less than twenty-four government clerks intend sloping off to the diggings, when their engagement* terminate in December." "The quantity of gold purchased in Melbourne, during the week ending 24th November, was 11,444 ounces." By the arrival of the barque Jane," says another paper, "Captain Norris, from the river Wairo Kiapara, we have re- ceived intelligence that gold has been discovered in abundance near some extensive plains, between the Bay of Islands and Hokiangs that the natives of that locality are determined to op- pose the government and others from either trespassing upon, or taking possession o,4 the land on which it is found. The natives in the district of Kiapara, are .in a state of actual starvation, and no prospect of relief until their crops are ripe." But unhappily this pleasant picture has its reverse. The- following pithy announcement suggests uncomfortable consi- derations A petition for a gold escort from Mount Alexandria to Gee- long is being got up."

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