Hide Articles List

19 articles on this Page

THE CRY -AT THE COMING ELECTIONS.

A POWERFUL MICROSCOPE.

[No title]

PHEASANTS.

News
Cite
Share

PHEASANTS. M. Temminck based his hopes on a wrong foundation, when he prognosticated the silver pheasant a denizen of our poultry yards. No breed of pheasant., wilh freedom, will ever becotnlt domesticated for a continuance a few exceptions there will be, and have been, as I shall be enabled to show, but their inherent disposition is erratic they will go miles for a freak, the worst of which is,they will not come back again. So far as the pugnacity, courage, and self-posstssion of the silver pheasant is allowedi the breed is all that can be dtsired, with this trifling etception-" if he have not any of his own species to bully, or meet with the spirited resistance oflome cock, his fighting propensities are sO intolerant, mean, and cowardly withal, that he will attack the poor hens of the poultry yard. And no race of savages are more dexterous at scalping. But I am anticipating. I have in my days had the care of, and entered with spirit for some years into, the management of poultry, in a plain and ob" servant way; and, so far as it was possible, aided by my em- ployer, we tried to domesticate the gold and silver pheasant, and the common pheasant, and the partridge also, but could 100' suoceed; for no sooner did the breeding season arrive, t^an the whole race of them, if at large, would disappear; the common pheasant and partridge to the woods and fields, to live and not be recognised amongst their fellows; their gaudierspecies to be' come an easy prey to the foxes, or otherwise, if an inkling of re* ward should flit across the minds of another description of captors, nearly ellied, they would find their way home again io a basket, then to be placed in durance vile till the breeding se&* son was over. Did any of my readers ever witness a pheasant's lfitting from an uonatural domicile 1 It is delightful to witness the cunning of the hens (as to the cocks, it is a mere follow my leader"), apparently conscious of the proceeding; now with measured, cautious pace, under covert of some hedge now scudding their way over open and exposed places, till they fancy themselves ⢠fairly distanced from the eye of observation, is so beautifuily done, at least I think so, that the sight can only be witnessed to be conceived. I really would advise a few incarcerated beings ( to be purpostly let loose, in order that so rich a treat might be enjoyed. But n.ind,they must be caught doing the thing of fhair o.vn accord-not be driven or frightened 'o r. Twenty years ago, my empioyer bought his origina stock of gold and silver pheasants of the late Duke of Marlborough, the former at ten, and the Iaiter, at seven guineas a brace. For some years we bred a great many for the London market, Mr Castang, & being purchasers. Finding them of late years a drsg on our hands, and their determination not to become poultry, but for ever to remain game, my growing laste inclining to cows and pigs, and to cultivating the substamial culinary products of the garden, &o., the birds were disposed cf, with the pheasantry and bantams into the bsrgain.-Cottage Gardener,

! AUSTRALIA. !

[No title]

PRESENTATION TO EARL FTZHARDINGE,…

1V0XDERLAND. !

. THE DISCONTENTED,

¡FACETIyE.

0 ANSWER TO G. F. HOLBROOKS'S…

. BARLEY BROTH.

0. MR. JEREMIAH TOPS' ADVICE…

THE LATE ELECTION.

NEWPORT AND PILLGWENNLY WATER…

WORCESTER AND HEREFORD RAILWAY.

. TO THOMAS BROWN, ESQ., OF…

THE GHOST-RAISER.

THE LATE ELECTION FOR THE…