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THE MONMOUTHSHIRE CANALI OMPANY…

THE EXCISE LAWS.

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THE CHOLERA MORBUS,

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THE SCHEW COMPANY.

NEWPORT DOCK.

REPORTS OF THE COMMISSIONERS…

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REPORTS OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF INQUIRY IN TO THE STATE OF EDUCATION IN WALES. E have heeu favoured with the 1st and 2nd pans-two ponderous volumesâcontaining' the results of the Commissioners' labours in Carmar- thenshire, Glamorganshire, and Pembrokeshire, (vol. 1st) and Breconshire, Cardiganshire, Radnor- shire, and Monmouthshire, (vol. 2.) A third kVolume will conclude the results of the Commission, .whlCh, oui readers will remember, was appointed in pursuance of a motion carried in the Commons' Mouse of Parliament, last Session, for an address to the Queen, praying Her Majesty to direct an inquiry to be made into the state ot education in the Principality of Wates, especially into the means afforded to the labouring classes of acquiring; a knowledge of the English language." The Secretary of State for the Home Department undertook on that occasion, on behall of Her Majesty's Government, that such an inquiry should be instituted, and he intimated that it should be conducted under the authority of the Committee of Council on Education. An immense mass of matterâembracing even the most minute detailsâ of the means and practice of education amongst the humbler classes in the counties mentioned, is now before both houses of the legislature, and in the hands of the conductors of the public press. We received the volume containing the inquiry through Monmouthshire only yesterday, and must therefore be limited in our extracts this week. The Commissioners assign the following reasons for embracing this county in the inquiry :â Although Monmouthshire no longer forms part of the Princi- pality, tiiat portion which is comprised within the great mineral basin is so thoroughly Welsh as regards the character, habits, and language of the larger part of its inhabitants, that it could scarcely bave heen excluded trom this inquiry wilhout injury to the comprehensiveness of the reports; neither would the pic- ture of the mining population have been complete without some statement of the eoatlrtion of thot section of it which presents stronger features than any other branch of the same heteroge- nous community. I found it necessary to limit the scope of inquiry as strictlvas I could to those parishes of which some part of the inhabitants were engaged in mineral labours, either in mines or iron woiks. This confined my investigation to eighteen parishes, forming the western side of the county, and adjacent to Brecknockshire and Glamorganshire. Although these partshes comprise an area only of 9B,520 acres out of the area of the whole county, which contains 324,310 acres, yet the population of this section amounted 10 no less than 86,079 in 1841, out of a total population in the county of 131.355. Thus, whilst in the non-mineral or agricultural part of the county, there are 4'67 acres to each person in the mining district, on which I am reporting, there are only 1*14 acres to each person. This will give some preliminary notion of the crowded state of this community. Whilst it contrasts strikingly with the scantiness of the population in the interior of Wales, it in some measure accounts for it, inasmuch as the miniDg communities are chiefly swollen by immigration, and are, in fact, the receptacle and refuge of nearly all tbe unem. ployed labourers whom crime or want have induced to travel thither, luted by the golden harvest with which report invests mineral adventure and the wages it dispenses. The increase of the population in Monmouthshire has ex- ceeded ihat of every other county io the kingdom, and has nearly doubled itself in the twenty years between 1821 and 1841. The hostility," says Mr. J. C. Symons, "evinced towards your lordships' minutes ot council of 1846, made known just previously to my arrival ia Monmouthshire, in some measure, and in some cases, extended itself to my inquiry, and impeded its execution. No inconsiderable interruption to my own inves- tigation was caused by the necessity of explanations to those who had expressed reluctance to further the labours of the assist- ants to whom it became essetitiat.to explain our commission, aod its disconnexion from tbe measmes recently propounded by the committee of council. I also endeavoured to impiess the Dissenters with the fact, that whatever their views as to the fittest remedy for the existing deficiency of educational means, those views could derive nothing but aid from an inquiry into facts, and a faithful representation of the statistfts of the case. I am bound to say that the Rev. Mr. Thomas, the principal of the Baptist College at Pontypool the Rev. Evan Jones, of Tredegar; the Rev. Mr. Bright, of Newport; W. Phillips. Esq., of Pontymoile, and other Dissenters of influence, who ex. pressed in no measured terms their disapproval of the minutes of council gave me very valuable assistance in the ptosecution of mv labours, which I am desirous of acknowledging with thanka. The clergv of the Church ot England were most cordial tn their assi-tance. The only class from whom I met with indifference to the inquiry, were some of the iron masters, and tho^e who employed the largest number of labourers. The Lord Lieute- nant, Mr. Hanbury Leigh, proved an honourable exception, and procured me every information 1 requested from him. To be continued.

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