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fe*" . __. 11 r. [ TIMES OF…

THE MONMOUTHSHIRE CANALI OMPANY…

THE EXCISE LAWS.

PROPOSED REMEDY FOR NATIONAL…

LOCAL INTELLIGENCE.

TIL E MON EY M A U K ET.—THURSDAY.

LONDON MARKETS—( WEDNESDAY.)

-_._---COLONIAL APPOINTMENTS.

Castletown Ploughing Match.…

CHEPSTOW.

PONTYPOOL.

MONMOUTH.

MONMOUTH TOWN COUNCIL.

ROME.

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CARDIFF.

IMPORTANT STREET-COMMISSIONERS'…

MERTHYR.

A FEW COKS ABOUT MONEY.

. To the Editor of the Monmouthshire…

THE CHOLERA MORBUS,

To the T.ditor of the Monmouthshire…

A BOARD OF HEALTH. A BOARD…

THE SCHEW COMPANY.

NEWPORT DOCK.

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NEWPORT DOCK. Tv the Editor (ll the Monmouthshire Merlin. SIR, My object in addressing the public, through the me- uium of your excellent journal, is (if possible) tQ draw the at- tention of the iron, tin, and coal masters, to their true advan- tage, winch, I am quite sure, will be best, consulted by giving this Dock their decided support and interest. ° It would, indeed, appear that the advantages of this great undertaking, to the port and district in general, have never been adequately appreciated; if such had been the case, the produce of the enterprise and manufacturing industry of Mon- mouthshire would be shipped at the Dock for foreign ports direct, instead of being put on board of small craft, at wharfs, for BriSiol, London, or Liverpool, and had the former enlarged course been adopted, we should have enjoyed, lona ere this, that w ach is most wanting to our district', an import trade. W hilst viewing the number of large ships in the Dock, a few days since. I felt much gratified at the scene around me. I began to inuulge a thought that the concern must now become a very lucrative one, and felt at a loss to account why the dock shareholders were not paid a dividend. FeeW interested in this particular (for I must tell you that I hold a few shares) I entered into conversation with several masters of vessels and learned, with a feeling of regret, that some of these vessels had been detained long periods for a cargo; others were enticed to leave the Dock under the promise of being loaded sooner at the wharfs in the river: while, in one instance, a vessel (the Nep- tune) was forced to leave the Dock against the master's indi- cation, to load at Mr. Bailey's wharf, with iron. Thinks I to myself, if all I hear is truth, 'tis little wonder the Dock does not pay, with so many conflicting interests to contend with ? Is it possible to remove these difficulties ? All at once I was in- formed, to my great delight, that Mr. C. (the clever agent of a millionaire manufacturer), had communicated to a dock pro- prietor the pleasing information, that il the wharfage of iron be reduced from 6d. to 4d., most of the iron exported from New- port would be shipped at the Dock If 2d. per ton will settle this great question and bring trade to a concern, which has been raised at such sacrifices to indi- vidualsâwhich is calculated to confer such immense benefits on Newport, and which it is the bounden duty of all men of business, connected with the locality, to support to the best of their power then, I say, there can be no doubt that the direc- tors will not lose a single opportunity in confirming such an arrangement with the iron masters as will give the Dock the traffic. Tile axiom, that reduced charges augment returns, is too well known and generally recognised to require any expatiation on this point, and confidently relying that a Dock, which is the admiration of all maritime men, who come within its capacious gates, will no longer be deprived of the fullest extent of trade afforded by the port, I am, Sir, your very obedient servant, A SHAREHOLDER. P.S.âI am glad to learn that the carrying out of improved facilities for shipping and general trade of the Dock, are now under consideration, with a view of being employed as soon as possible. Newport, Nov. 2oth, 1S47.

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