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THE NORTHERN LOVER'S SERENADE.

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ELEMENTS OF HAPPINESS.,

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POLICE I N tEL L I G E NC…

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POLICE I N tEL L I G E NC E. NEWPORT POL ICE.âMONDAY, MAY 1. Hefore Thomas Hughes and Thomas Hawkins, Esqrs. [Continued from our last week's paper.") Mrs. Hannah Rees. heller known through Newpoit ahd the country side. as Mrs. Higgs, was placed :\tlhcbar,charged with stealing a shovel, the property of Mr. W. H. Wittiams, proprie- 'orof the "Coal Establishment, Cardifi road, West-end."âMr. Bothomley. from Mr. Phillpott's office, appeared to defend Mrs. Rees, if a lady of her prowess would condescend to be defended, lod, indeed, considering the athletic proportions, the warlike propensities, and known temperament of his fair protege, the indertaking of Mr. Bothomley was one of no ordinary peril. As soon as the case was called on the defendant, who is tall, masculine, and exceedingly formidable in appearsnce, dilating tier ample chest, which heaved with the Vibjence ofcohteiiding emotions, stepped forward, aiid opened such a fire on the pro- secutor as would quickly have put him to the rout, had he not been protected by the authority of the tribunal to which he ape pealed. Nothing daunted, and warming in her eloquence, she approached the prosecutor, who very prudently retired beyond arms' length, when the magistrates interposing, suggested to Mrs. Rees the propriety of allowing Mr. Bothomleyto mtnage her case, lest, in the warmth of her teal, she might overstep the hounds of discretion. This tecommendation considerably abated the choler of Mrs. Rees, who, though proverbially headstrong and impetuous, can moderate the violence of her temper at the suggestion of expediency, and yield to the whisperings of that deep and pervading cunning which finds no inadequate expression in her small, deep-seated, And unsteady hazel eye. âMr. Williams having been sworn, stated that about five or six months ago he lost a shovel from his coal-yard, but had tin â¢uspicion of the thief until abtsitt two months since, when Mrs. Rees called him into her house, and showed him the shovel, now produced, which was the one he had lost, and lold him that his man had been there to claim it. Witness told her it was his property, and he would swear to it, she then said that she would pay for witness's oath that Laurence, his man, was one of the greatest thieves in the neighbourhood and that the sho- vel was hers before she let the yard to the prosector; and that she would prove this by the evidence of a man who lived on the hills.âIn his cross-examination, prosecutor said that he rented his coal-yard from Mrs. Rees, but that he gave it up yesterday, having first paid the rent.âMr. T. J. Phillips, said it appeared by prosecutor's own statement, that he had seen the shovel in prisoners possession, two months' 3;;0, and, therefore, it ap- peared strange that the charge was not lr. Mnhi bdore.}'he prosecutor said he was waiting for the testimony of the man on the hills, whom she had spoken of; besides he did not wish to put a neighbour to expense, nor to bring her before her betters. âMr. Bothomley submitted that the charge offelony w as done away with, as Mrs. Rees had promised to return the shovel.â Prosecutor, who appeared to be ruffled by this remark, said, Stay, stay, Sir, she said no such thing; not a word about giving it. I wish you may get it.' "âMrs. Rees could not stand this, and was about to open again, when Mr. Hughes said, Now, Mrs. Rees let me beg of you to be quiet."âMr. Hawkins: "Mrs. Rees, you must be quiet."âOne of the officers here stepped between Mrs. Rees and the prosecutor, and the cross-examination went on.âWitness received two notices from Mrs. Rees, to quit the last was a notice that she would apply to the magistrates to "eject him.-âMr. Bothomley here .sked witness why he did not take the shovel when Mrs. Rees showed it to him.âWitness Oh, oh yes, indeedâtake the shovel ehâ(Loud laughter)âaye, aye, that would be a nice business, would'nt it? I wish you may get it i would you take it? (Roars of laughter.) 1 did not want to have any little brains in my skull knocked out."âThe Court which was ex- ceedingly crowded, was here convulsed with laughter and Mrs. Rees feeling thatfiesh and blood could stand i' no longer, rushed forward towards the witness, who wisely retired in the direction of the Superintendent of Police. Much noise ensued, which was checked by the Magistrates, who said they did not see any ground for the charge of fefony two months, at least, had elapsed since the prosecutor saw the shovel in the prisoner's possession and he had not brought forward the charge, The parties seemed to be on bad terms, and ihe magjstiates would dismiss the case. THURSDAY, MAY 5. Before the Mayor, ritos. Hawkins, and Thos. Hughes, Esqrs. Patrick Fleming, a private of the 11th Regt., at present stationed here, was charged with stealing a watch, the property of John Waters, landlord of the iJlume of feathers, in Com- mercial-street.âIt appeared by the evidence that the prosecutor lost the watch, on Saturday the 16th of April, and on the even- ing of the 20th, it was found by a corporal of the Illh, se. crcted in the bolster of prisoner's bed. Prisoner, on being asked by the scrceanl, how long he had had il, said for nine or ien days.âThe watch was produced by Superintendent Hopkins, and identified by prosecutor.âCommitted. Anne Lewis (alias Glove and Shears), and Mary Lockyer, two unfortunate women, of forbidding aspect, from Friars' Fields, were charged with stealing 18s., from the person of Sa. muel Hewer, from whose evidence it appeared that he had been a servant to Mr. Rees, of Holybush farm, and that on Monday the 2nd inst., being Caerleon fair-day, between 11 and 12 o'clock in the mornings he went, with another man, named John Long, into a public-house Called the New Ship, in Friars Fields, and had some drink. Long shortly afterwards went out, and the two prisoners came in. Prosecutor then commenced drinking with them, and, by his own account, he paid for several quarts and pints of beer, quite enough to m?ke him, and those that were with him, drunk. The women then took his hat and handkerchief, and nent upstairs with them, whither he followed them, and had more drink, and here, after much disgusting proceedings, the prisoner lost his money.âThe charge Wall fully proved, and, of course, the prilloners were committed for trial. Cases, like the present, suggest a remark which we have often heard made, and which is not without rea- son to support it, viz., that while it is necessary to vindicate the justice of the country by the prosecution of offenders of this description, yet it is a scandal to public morals, and a grievous hardship on the public who have to pay the cost, that fellows like the prosecutor may unpunished rush recklessly into danger, and throw temptation in the way of unfortunate beings, who, but for the profligacy of the other sex, would be obliged to have recourse to someTiohest means of obtaining a subsistence. Patrick Coogan and Daniel O'Connell, the Stewards of the IIibernia Independent Benefit Society, were summoned by Daniel Cronin, a member of the Society, for illegally ex. cluding him from the Society.âMr. Woollelt,for the stewards, objected that the Magistrates had no jurisdiction, the matter having been already decided by a committee of the society, and the Act of Parliament providing that the iragistrates shall have jurisdiction only where the dispute shall not have been so decided.âCronin objected that the committee which decided the case was not legally constituted the rules require that no "i'6?! i F *'le sociely s^all on such committee unless he shall have been two and a half years a member, and as more than onc mcmber of that committee was less than that period on the boois, the committee was not legally constituted.âThe stewards were ordered to restore the complainant to all the ad- vantages of which his exclusion deprived him. Mrs. Anne Richards, a person rather respectably attired, and beyond the middle age, whose sharp angulas features, quick pe- nftrattngeye, thin pale lips, drawn tightly over discoloured Ucth, and general fidgelly and uneasy manner, bespoke her iI. shrew, appeared to answer the complaint of Mrs. Mary F-vans, who was much her junior in years, and heller looking in the face, but low, fat, dumpy, and vulgar.âMrs. Evans being sworn, said that on Saturday evening last, between six and seven o'clock, she was coming from Pill, where she lived, 'o the market, at Newport, when she met the defendant, Mrs. Kichards, who attacked her in a very abusive manner, spit in her face, and told her that she kept a female in her house, whom she designated by a very improper, though very common epithet; she also pushed her, and, altogether, considering the state she was in," she felt at the time very considerable alarm for the conscquences.âMrs. Richards, who though advanced In years, was evidently in as thriving a state as Mrs. Evans, here interrupted the witness to assure the magistrates that she was not at all tobtame, because Mrs. Evans kept a young person in her house, who was constantly visited by her (Mrs. R.'s), son, who, when he came home, after being in her company was accustomed to beat and abuse her and his father.âMrs. Evans, however, did not allow all this to go for nothing, as she also went on addressing the magistrates while Mrs. Richards was slating her case, assuring them that the statement, so far as respected the young person who lodged with her was untrue, she being a very inoffensive and virtuous young woman.â The ma- gistrates, however, after many fruitless endeavours, succeeded in checking (he volubility of Mrs. Richards, and asked Mrs. Evans if she had any witnesses to produce, when she called George Bennet, but before he was sworn, the mayor asked Mrs. Evans if she was sure Mrs. Richards spat in her face, to which, having replied in the affirmative, the mayor observed, that she mast have a very good water-spout.Bennett being sworn, stated that he saw the parties on the tram-road they were shoulder to shoulder, pushing one another; ho heard no words, and saw no spitting, in fact, Air. Bennett recollected nothing except in so far as his memory would be likely to serve Mrs. Richards, whose husband, we understood, belonged to the same profesi on as Mr. Bennett, a coal-shipper.âThe Mayor to Mr. Hcnnett You saw no blows 1 No.âNo spitting? No. Nothing but them there women shoving one another ? Nothing. âThe mayor (laughing) They must have been like two rams, then. This sally was of course received with a laugh by 'he CourtâMrs. Richards here again, leaning over the magistrates' table, addressing the mayor, began to urge her wrongs, when his worship saidâNow, Mrs. Richards, stop. Mis. Richards went on.-His Worship Mrs. Richards, I do tell you stop. â Mrs. Richards went on,âFlis Worship, much excited, ex- claimed, with great emphasisâMrs. Richards, stop, I do tell yon to stop, Mis. Richards.âMrs. Richards, seeing that her eloquence had no effect, and perhaps dreading the conssquences of further importunity, allowed his worship to proceed, who saidâMrs. Richards, this is a very serious case you assaulted that there young woman,and spat in her face; though the witness Bennett said nothing of it, I believe that witness knows more of the matter than he do wish to tell. I could inflict a very heavy punishment upon you, but at present you will be fined 2s. 6d. and costs. Mrs. Richards, who appeared to think that she had got cheaply out of the scrape, paid ihe fine and costs, and observing that she had a sovereign or two vet to spare, cast a rather sinister squint at his worship, and whisked out of Court. William Curran was fined 2s. 6d. and costs, for an assault on Johanna Palmer. John Ellis was charged with assaulting P.C. Iluxtablc. in the execution of his duly.âli appeared by the evidence of lluxtable, that the prisoner was in company with John Jones, who was convicted in the penalty of iof. und costs last court day, for creating a riot in Bane's Well. They had both got drunk at the bid-ale," held at George Blacks, in Wedlake's Couit. Jones was stripped lor fighting, and the prisoner Ellis .Ui abetting him, and holding his clothes, and when the officer attempted to take Jones inlo custody, he wasresisted and struck by prisoner.âThe Mayor said, that though he has as tender n feeling as any one for the poor, yet he would be glad any one would lay an information against the bid-ales, for they are the greatest nuisances.âThe magistrates would convict the prison- ers in the penalty of 10s. and costs, or one month's imprison. ment. William Davis was charged by Mr. T.J. Phillips, under Martin's Act, with cruelty to a dog.âMr. Phillips stated 'hit he saw the prisoner that morning throw a poor dog over the nidge, and when the dumb animal would creep through the mud o make his escape, the two-legged brute would catch him, and 'brow him over again.âMr. Phillips applied to the magistrates o pospone the case, in consequence of the absence of Captain I artitl, who was a material witnesl.-Remanded. FRIDAY, MAY 6. B?Jt>re the ftlayor, Thomas Hughes, William Brewer, Thomas Hawkins, and Thomas Prothero, Esqrs. FORcrBLE ENTRY. this morning, the office was crowded by persons anxious to hear the proceedings in it case of forcible entry, which gaV6 rise tuntuchinterestinthetown. When the maolslrates took their Seat?, the following persons wepe charged by Mr. T. Wpotjett; who appeared for Mrs..Atirie Reed, with forcibly entering her premises, fh Comriieifcial-street, on Thursday, the 5ih inst.: â Messrs. Thomas Price, Watkin Richards, W. M. Townsend, and John Rowe, Robert Cole, George Gould, Wm. Thomas alias Young Bumper, and Wm. Holmes.âBefore the evidence Has gone into, the mayor rose and said, that it had been com- municated to him by a very respectable gentleman that morning, that he had something to do with this business. He denied it; he had not seen l\lr. Richards during the week, and he did not knovy anything a-botit wjiat had OCttijred till ten o'clock the night before. If he fell any partiality it would be to Mr. Gough, whom he had known, because lie had never been in Mr. Price's company six times in his life. It was a complete false- hood that he had anything to do with the business.âMr. Gough was then called, and examined by Mr. Woollett: He said, I know Mrs. Anne Rees, who has a house in Commercial-street, in this town she is tenant for that house, of Mr. Joseph Navies, of Cardiff- Mrs. Rees had a sale of her furniture at the house, on Wednesday and Thursday, Vesterday evening (Thursday) I was at the house, at the close of the sale, and I sawall the defendants there (naming them.) They were under the direction of Price and Townsend, who gave them orders to keep possession. Immediately the auctioneer announced the sale over, Captain Richaids delivered to Mr. trice, what looked like a (lease, and said he gave him possession of the premises on behalf ol Mr. Davies, the landlord. The whole of the defendants were present at the lime, i then said that Mrs. Rees had riot given up possession, as the period of her tenantcy had not expired. Price replied, lhat possession had been given him, and lie would keep it. Townsend pointed to the men and said they were his ⢠he also said that the Mayor had given him authority to act. Several of the men had large sticks in their hands, Price had no stick, but he frequently gave directions to the Inen.âMr. Woolleit, who acted as Mrs. Rees's solicitor, asked the defend* ants their names, when Townsend said, my men, you have got no names, you are here by my orders, and I shall indemnify you the defendants declined to give their names. Townsend said he was there as clerk to Mr. Clarke, the attorney, of this town Richards said he acted on the part of Mr. Davis, the landlord and Price seemed to have the general superintendence of the whole. I asked Price and Townsend several times if they meant to beep possession, and they said they did. The appearance and manner of all the defendants was such as to cause me to feel much alarm and apprehension. A carpenter was biought in by the defendants, who put a staple and padlock on the front door; all the defendants (except Richards) and others to the number of fifteen were in the room at the time the carpenter told me he put the lock on by direction of Capt. Richards; I could not have gone into the street without tres- passing on other persons ptopeity. Mr. Morgan asked to get in, but he was told that the door was fast and he could not come in he then went to the window, which was fastened by Wm. Thomas, to prevent Morgan raising it, Morgan broke a square of glass in the window, unscrewed the fastening, and came in through the window; several persons followed Morgan, and upon their coming in, Townsend said to the defendants, Now, my men, rank and file, now for your pistolsthe de- fendants then went together on one side of the room, Price then sent for beer and eatables for the defendants, and said Now my boys, make youiselves comfortable, I shall give you what- ever you want;" I found it nesessary to send for assistance, the force about me of the defendants being too strong, and I would be afraid to remain among them without assistance. In his rross-cxamination by Mr. Prothero, Mr. Gough said, with the exception of what 1 have stated, I saw no acts of violence com- mitted by the defendants; 1 cannot say that I saw any act of violence at all. I did not want to go out of the house, there was no restriction put upon my person or actions. The defend- ants were present when Morgan broke the window and came in, and they did not attempt to oppose his entrance. Richards appeared to be under the impression that Mrs. Rees's tenantcy had expired. Mrs. Rees had received notice to quit on the 1st of May, or at such time as her tenantcy expired. (YVitness here put in the notice.) There was a sale on the First of May; Mrs. Rees had not given up her tenantcy.âTo Mr. Hawkins the padlock was put upon the front door, and so far I was under restraint; I am certain if I asked they would not let me out at that door.âTo Mr. W. M. Townsend I acted on behalf of Mrs. Rees, and have no direct interestâoo interest but hers she paid £35. per annum for the house, and has not underlet it to Mr. Woollett at an increased rent; her lenantcy has not expired I swear her taking was a November taking. Price frequently entreated the men to be peaceable. There were not more than seven persons in the house on my pait, and of those three were women. Mis. Rees had not at all vacated possession.âJohn Morgan was next sworn and ex- amined by Mr. Woollett: he said he was a carpenter, and the day before he was told by Captain Richards to put a padlock on Mrs. Rees's front door, witness did as he was directed, and fastened the lock, but did not give up the key 10 any one he afterwards look off the lock by the direction of Mr. Woollett; sawall the defendants in the house; Townsend and Thomas were the only persons whom he saw with sticks.âMr. Gough being re-called and examined by Mr. Prothero said I asked Price and Townsend to go out, but they refused, and Piice said the men were there by his directions.âMr. E. V. Jenkins examined by Mr. Woollett said I am a druggist, and live opposite Mrs. Rees's house was there yesterday between four and five o'dock, and saw several of till defendants, two or three of whom had sticks heard no directions given by Price he came into witnesses's shop, and asked him to step out, that they were going to do something, but witness did not go.âMr. Woollett was next sworn and said I am attorney for Mrs. Bees, and have been for some time endeavouring to obtain for her a lease from her landlord, Mr. Joseph Davis, of Cardiff, which he has contracted to grant her. Yesterday I attended the sale at Mrs. Reea's house, and saw Price, Richards, Townsend, and the other defendants there; towards the 1 lose of the sale my suspicions were excited, the defendants were present in the house, and I can speak particularly as to Rowe, Thomas, and Coles, as having lafrge sticks I took pre- cautions to secure the premises as well as I coutd just before the close of the sale, I saw Townsend go up to Mr. Pritchard, the auctioneer, in an angry manner, and address something to him which I did not hear, but I heard him say something about the Mayoi seeing the men acting together, and armed with sticks, I considered there was danger; I went into the sale room and saw Townsend reading what I understood to be a notice to quit. Richards gave what appeared to be a deed into the hands of Price, saying at the same time that he gave him possession for Mr. Davis. I asked Mr. Price if he meant to lake possession under that deed,and he said yes. Mr. Gough and I 'hen asked him to walk out, and he said lie should not. I then asked Price if iheoiher men were there by his authority, and he told me they were. I asked the men for their names, when Townsend came forward and said Don't tell your names, you are here by my authority, and I will indemnify you." Richards told me that he merely acted in the exercise of his duty to deliver possession to Price which he did pursuant to in- structions from Messrs. Prothero and Towgood, Mr. Davis' solicitors, that he had given Price possession, and we might fight it out between us. 1 then went to Mr. Hopkins, Superin- tendent of Police, who shortly after came. I again asked Price and others of the defendants to leave, but they still refused. Immediately after a padlock was put upon the door. J then became alarmed, and endeavoured to get some persons into the house I again desired Townsend and Price to leave, as Mr. Gough and I intended to hold possession for Mrs. Rees. I asked them if Thomas and the other defendants remained in the house by their authority ? They said they did. 1 again lold all the defendants to go out, but they would not. 1 did not consider it safe to remain in the house all night. I got out at the back-door, and went through a garden into Charles-street. 1 went to Mr. l.J. Phillips office, and gave instructions for an information, and returned to the house. I got in through the window, which was opened for me by some one inside. I said 10 I rICe and lownsend, "Once moie, as Mrs. Rees's attorney, 1 must request you 10 leave this houye but they refused to go out; the other defendants also refused, upon a similar request being made to them. I then got out of the win- dow, and went to Mr. Phillips' office, where I completed the information, and got a warrant. I returned to the house, and got in through the window. Mr. Hopkins was at the time out- side of the house among the crowd, who had collected in front. I then desired some one to open the door, which was done. Hopkins then came in, and the defendants were taken into cus- tody. I then cleared the house of all but three persons, whom ivh ,re 10 ca,e âCross-examined by Mr. Protheio When the men were taken into custody there was no opposition or resistance whatever. Morgan and his party being present at the time through the whole business, theie was not the slightest attempt to injure any one there was not-even a verbal threat; I was determined to retain possession, and to enable me to do so, I sent for force. There was no opposition when I ordered the lock to be taken off; it would be no use and they knew it; "bile I was piesent, there was no attempt to retain possession by force.âMr. Woollet applied to the magistrates to remand the case in consequence of the absence of a material witness, Mr. Pritchard, the auctioner. If the magistrates would ad- journ the case till the next morning, he would take care to have i\lr. Pritchard in attendance.â The case was then adjourned till Saturday morning.â i\Jr. Prothero said the case was an im- portant one, involving some nice points of law, and requested Mr. Woollett to get any cases that might be in the books, to as- sist the magisiiates in adjudicating. The entry of ihe men was legal, it being perfectly competent for them to attend at the auctton their possession also was not attended with any force or violence whatever; the question then would be, whether, under entry circurTla,ances magistrates could convict for forcible SATURDAY, MAY 7. Jiej'ore the same Magistrates. The magistrates took their seats on the bench at twelve o clock. j'eii0-urJ was much crowded throughout the day.â itr" o W e rl.tc'larjl» auctioneer, being swom, said, he sold Mrs Rees s furniture by auction, at her house, in Commercial- street, on Wednesday and Thursday, the 4th and 5th instant. owar s e c ose of the sale on Thursday evening, Mr. 1 owns- i10 na,j'i C.^I.15 'e l° 'n^or,n me that be was employed by the landlord to take possession of the house; he also said he had thesanc .on of the magistrates to lake forcible possession, and ,0 hold it; and, ,0 order to carry it into effect, he had eight 0, ten ugly fellows, who wete ,eady to turn us out, and if there Was any opposition, to glve Us > b- ood hidin â witness saw the defendants there, and thought three of llieiu had sticks. lr1 Ty- 1 ,i,en «p *ei1 s°me- 0 uolv'e saj,i ?i'n^ rc,llrn saw all the delendants in the room" y W°Uld not their hands to strike any one, but that hey were determined lo remain in the house, and if any one attempted to tu.n them out they would knock him down, lhat was stated Iou,| enough to be heard by all present. I he conduct of the defendants caused interruption lo the witness in the sale, but he did nm rââi ,u examined by Mr. Prothero Dul, £ T and Thursday, the front door i.? Wedne,?,W walk who chose there was no l, would be made by persons making a forcihl^ s .aS out; the entry of the defendants^X l" in quietly like other persons; w|lal 'towT^' «hey «alked c Jo me to feel any a/arm l'd,d not see at v 3 !"{ M n0' done by any of the defendants Thomas however °LVi° to me, and pointed towards the door, which 1 un ilâ¢! ? intimation that I had belUr be oft i Ta^ pe?l?a l"8 To Mr. Townsend Ycu came up to me in a complimenUry manner, and it is incorrect to say that y0tt addressed me in an angry tone.âThis was the case 111 support of the infoimation. DEFENCE. John Morgan, the caipenter who was examined yesterday. was again called, and on being sworn said, that when he was taking off the lock, he saw no person present with a pistol; he saw the men come in through the window the person who had the pistol used it in endeavouring to lake off the lock; it was a double-barrel pistol does not know whether that person was brought by Mr. Woollett or Mr. GoUgh. Mr. Woollett was present when.the pistol was producedâCross-examined by Mr. VV'ooliett The person v?fio had lh £ 6'lslol, was wiih Mr. Woolleit when IVLT. Woollett ofdeted witness (6 1 e'kfe off the lock. Mr. Woollett must have seen the pistol he made no remark, nor did he appear to be surprised when he saw il.âTo Mr. Prothero I do not think the pistol was brought there for the purpose to which it was applied, but for some other purpose. âTo Mr. Woolleit: I was ordered to go to the house of Capt. Richards, and not by Mr. Woollett.âSamuel Valentine, ex. amined by Captain Richards, slated that he was at the sale at Mrs. Rees's, on Thursday, between six and seven o'clock, and liaw a man there with a acuble-barfel pistot the person who had it said to witness, Sam, this Is the boy that will go it, when one is off the other is ready." The man tfhfi had the pistol came in with Mr. Morgan he is a servant to Mr. Mor- gan, and came in through the window.âWitness, in his cross- examination by Mr. Woollett, said, does not know his name, but knows his person well; his Christian name is Edmund had no doubt as to the man, as he knew him for years; was not acting in coricert with the defendants; was told by Mr. Woollett to leave the house, and did sO Immediately no one asked witness his name on that evening. Had been frequently before the magistrates had been in prison at Usk. Edmund Williams, Mr. Morgan's man, was here produced, and witness swore positively that he was the man who had the pistol. The witness admitted that he had been in gaol at Bristol, once for an assault and once for passing a bad half-crown.âMr. Wool- lett applied to have the witness Valentine detained, as he would prefer a charge for perjury against him.âThe witness Morgan, the carpenter, was here re-called, and swore positively that Williams was not the man who had the pistol.âEdmund WII. liams, examined, said he was present in Mrs. Rees' house on Thursday he had not a pistol in his possession that day. In his cross-examination by Mr. Prothero, witness admitted that lie was convicted of stealing coals, about eight years ago, and was ihlpfisbned fof it at Usk.âMr. Woollett then addressed the magistrates* at some length, contending that the evi- dence produced fully supported the information.âMr« Prothero said it was a deplorable state of society when so many men could be found ready to come forward at any time to do any act of violence that might be pointed out to them. It will be neces- sary to teach them that they must not act so now; that that tendency must be repressed. There was no doubt that the con. duct of the defendants was highly reprehensible, and that they were guilty of a breach of the peace; but he entertained very strong doubts wheiher they were guilty of forcibly entering in the meaning of the statute. It appeared to him that Mrs. Rees could not proceed either under the statute or at com- mon law, having neither a lease nor the freehold. Under these circumstances, he thought it would not be fair to commit, when it was so very unlikely that the defendants would be convicted in another court. On the whole he would put it to the magistrates whether the justice of the case would not be fully satisfied by binding over the defendants to appear at sessions, to answer any charge which might be brought against them,-The Mayor said I agree entirely with Mr. Prothero, who is more comprehensive on points of law than me. t have considered this case a good deal; 1 was up late last night, and up early this morning sifting through the acts I have at home, and I do not find that there was any forcible entry licre. There was a great deal of what was very improper done, particularly of Townsend, but I would hot give much weight to that; see what he said about the magistrates, but no one be lieved him see what he says of the landlord, that's not true he said too he would give them a b-y hiding," but it was not done. They went on well together, eating and drinking to- gether, and when the door was ordered 10 be opened, there was no objection made. In my mind there is no forcible entry but if it was, it is a case turning on a pivot, as Mr. Prothero says, and he hoped the gentlemen on the bench would adopt the course pointed out by Mr. Prothero.âThe magistrates appear. ing to entertain different opinions on the case, Mr. T. J. Phillips proceeded to take their votes, when Messrs. Hughes, Brewer, and Hawkins, being a majority of the bench were of opinion that the charge laid in the information was proved the defend- ants were consequently committed.âMr. Brewer said he thought George Gould should be discharged, he being described as Benjamin Gouid in the information and warrant. Mr. T. J. Phillips said that he having pleaded and answered the misno- mer, it had been recently decided in another case, that the proceeding was regular.âThe Mayor: I think I am right yet, and not me alone, but I will read youâMr. Prothero here interrupted the Mayor, observing that as a majority of the magistrates had already given their judgment, the Mayor could not call upon them to reconsider it.âMr. T. J. Phillips st ited that the magistrates would take bail for the defendants.âMr. Prothero said the lowest possible amount of bail should be required for the defendants Rowe, Thomas, Gould, Coles, and Holmes, as from their condition in life they would no doubt find it difficult to obtain bail.âMr. Hawkins proposed that £ 50. bail should be required for Price, Richards, and Towns- end, and £10. for the rest.â Mr. Prothero The effect of that would be to send the five men to gaot he would propose that £5. be required for them. This was finally adopted.âMr. Prothero One of the defendants, Mr. Townsend, may perhaps find some difficulty in obtaining bail for £ 50.âMr. Townsend Not the least, Sir,âI can find bail for a thousand if required. âMr. Prothero: I think Mr. Price and Mr. Richards ought to find bail for the other five defendants.âMr. George Gething become bail for Messrs. Price and Richards, Mr. W. N. Mor- gan for Mr. Townsend, and Mr. Penny, brewer, for Rowe, Cole, Thomas, Gould, and Holmes. The Court did not ad. journ till half-past six o'clock in the evening.