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'L- "C"' -TT UV R?)]7I>I?TAÂ¥ h > iuQI Dim niliuii. RY W.'HARRISON*AINSWORTH, 'gUrrao; OF TKK TOWSR OF LOKDON," WIMIOA CASTLE," OLD SAINT PAUL'S," BOOCOBEL," &C., &C. \<XLV.âA WlXTEE IN THE SOCTH OF FEANCB RKOROSFIO FOR MILDSED.^ Tin occurrence on the Mere, in which Stanley played so ponspietvnii, a part, seemed to afford him extreme satisfactionâaud no wonder, since â¢everybody, even the men-servants, regarded him as a port; of hero. Krw, afterward^. Rose herself appeared on the lav. i«, r.tja»uled by Georgette, She had been pro- vi.-f, with one of Mildred's morning dresses, and Iouiv<L very well in it. After flanking Stanley most warmly for tho f?r. erviees he had rendered her, she said, I ca1. that you have saved my life." no reflection will always be gratifying to me," ::0 replied. [Tad he not reseued you I should never have felt happy again," said the Squire since I was the cause of the accident. And I can assure you, ray dear young; lady, I felt a sharper pang than I I have ever before experienced when you fell into â¢the water." "P'-ay think of it no more/'said Rose. "I what you meant to do." The day was so line that the majority of the party remained on the lawn for some time longer. M ildred was the first to retire, and she took with her sister Aline and Georgette. A hatter understanding than had previously â subsisted between Mildred and Rose seemed to have sprung up between them, and when they .separated they kissed each other affectionately. I hope I shall see you to-morrow," said Mil- dred," if the day is fine. I shaH certainly come here but shall only admire the lake at a dis- tance. "My unexpected plunge has not at all alarmed nip," said Rose, and I should not object to .another row to-morrow." "Be prudent," said Stanley, "I may not al- ways be near to help you." I must speak to papa, and tell him he will be â responsible for any future mishap," said Mildred. Rose laughed. Mildred, and those with her, now entered the house and proceeded to their own rooms while Rose and Stanley took possession of a bench, charmingly placed near a bed of roses. Here let us leave them for a. time, and visit .another bench on the opposite side of the lawn, where we shall find Lady Starkey in the full en- joyment of a tete-a-tete, with the Squire. I am thinking of returning to town almost immediately," she said. Indeed he exclaimed. I am very sorry to hear it. I hope it is not a sudden resolution." Not altogether sudden," she rejoined. But I begin to think I haw outstayed nIY welcome." Pray don't entertain any such notion," he replied. I intend to give a garden party or two, and a dinner almost immediately. I hope you will stay for them." I canot positively promise," she replied "but I won't leave before if I can help it. How things are changed she exclaimed, with a deep sigh. At one time I persuaded myself that I should remain here altogether. I fancied you wished me to become mistress of Beaucliffe." Somewhat embarassed,the Squire did not exactly know what sort of answer to make. I thought you had quite changed your mind," he said. You could not have entertained such a poor opinion of me," she rejoined. I was quite pre- pared to fulfil my engagement, and I expected yon to fulfil yours." Difficulties I had not foreseen arose," said the Squireâ" insuperable difficulties." "And these still exist, I suppose?" said Lady Starkey. "Let us come to a clear understand- "I fear so," he replied. "Nothing, I need scarcely say, could be more gratifying to me than a union with a person of your ladyship's distinc- tion and accomplishments, but I am obliged to abandon the idea." Why so? demanded Lady Starkey. You have not been rejected by me." "But you have asumed such a hostile form to my daughter and her husband that I fear a perfect reconciliation between you is impossible and, without that, happiness could not be expected while living together in the same house, and constantly meeting. I have a suggestion to offer to your ladyship. Re- lease me from my promise, which cannot be satis- factorily carried outâbut remain here, withas much authority as you have hitherto enjoyed, as lo1 g as you think proper." Well, I consent," she replied. I confess I am very comfortable here but if I should be- come tired of the place, I can run up to town at any time." "Exactly," replied the Squire, and return when you think proper. From the present state cf my dear child's health, I fear I may expect to lose her, and in that case there can be no obstacle â âat least, on my partâto our union. Does this arrangement suit your ladyship ?" i Perfectly," she replied. Then let us take a walk round the lawn." She delightedly acceded to the proposal. Rose and Stanley still occupied the bench they had chosen. They looked graver than they did, for they were discussing the possibility of Lady Starkey's immediate return to town, in which case Rose would have to accompany her. I don't think my mother will consent to part with you," said Stanley. "Of late you have be- come quite necessary to her." I have tried to make myself useful," replied Rose. But I really am very fond of Mrs Brere- ton, and, no doubt, she perceives it. I don't be- lieve I shall ever be as happy again as I have been jat the old hall. I like it quite as well as Beau- cliffe-in some respects better." You are very kind to say so, but I should scarcely think that possible," he replied. For instance, we have nothing at Brereton like this loyely lawn, or the Mere. It is strange that Mildred never could reconcile herself to the old touse." Your mother says she took an early dislike to the place, and never tried to overcome it." I believe that's true. I should like to consult you about Mildred's health. My mother is seri- ously alarmed. What is your opinion?" "My opinion is that she ought not to pass another winter in this rigorous climate. She must pp to Nice, or some other place in the South of Vance," Will you and Sister Aline accompany her. ked Stanley, anxiously. I will go with lier if khe wishes it, replied Rose and I am quite sure Sister Aline is too devoted to her to leave her at such a critical juncture. I trust she may be restored to perfect Tiealth." j I trust she may," echoed Stanley. But I confess I am very doubtful. Still, the mild climate may work wonders. I am greatly obliged by your prompt compliance with my re- quest." Depend upon it, I will do all I can," said Rose earnestly. 1 pity her exceedingly, and I love her as much as I pity her. If I can do nothing else, I can help to make her latter days happy." That is exactly what I desire," said Stanley, W H.11 a grateful look. "With you and Sister Aline to tend her, I feel that nothing wiU be â¢â Wanting either in personal comfort or religious consolation. It is sad that she cannot pass her last hours in the house in which she was born, and where she has always lived, but I believe this to be her only chance." I am sure it is," said Rose. I do not think she ever had a day's illness â¢until she quitted her father's house and returned almost in a dying state," said Stanley. I "What a change exclaimed Rose. At one time I suspected poison-" Poison exclaimed Rose. "But I have since dismissed the injurious thought from my breast." You are right to do so," said Rose. One person only could have committed the » rrime, and I belie ve him to be utterly incapable of hit," I acquit him entirely," said Stanley. I attribute her sufferings entirely to remorseâthe effect of which has been as terrible as that of poison itself." Rose made no reply, but her looks showed that she entertained the same opinion. It is from this conviction that I anticipate the difficulty of a perfect cure. It is a disease of the toitl rather than the body, and hitherto all her penitence has proved unavailing." I do not despair," said Rose. Tranquillity of mind may be restored. She has looked much -easier of late." Just then the Squire and Lady Stanley came up. You don't seem, from your looks, to be hoid- â¢.Uig a very lively conversation," said her ladyship. "We were "talking of dear Mildred." replied ilose. St anley agrees with me that she must past next winter in the South of France. r have promised to take charge of her, and we hope to prevail on Sister Aline to go with us." ".1 entirely approve of the plan," said the Squire. It gives me the greatest possible pain to see her, as it were, dying by inches, and I hope M*ou may be enabled to restore her to her former -eealtli. T don't suppose she will object to go, but you must not make quite certain." I Of course, the decision will be left entirely to iter," aid Stanley "but I do not anticipate any difficulty. On the contrary, I think sheWlll be greatly pleased by the proposition." There is only one thing against it," said the Squire. She told me she would never leave this tiouse again." When she knows we wish to restore her to ^calch, she may think differently," said Rose, j. As I fully belie ve her life depends on the change, strenuously." If your opinion is confirmed, not a word can De^aid," rejoined the Squire. I have always heard that the shores of the â Mediterranean offer a charming climate for in- VaJUs, said Lady StarSrey, and I therefore ,1mt support my niece's opinion." Do you feel inclined to go to Nice for the win- er, aunt ?" asked Hose. Lady Starkey looked at the Squire. ⺠I should prefer Cannes or Mentone, from what j hear of them," he said. But I don't think I K«a *eave Beaucliffe, unless Mildred wishes to ^â¢ye me with her. You must stop and take care ,I,hou8e for me," he added to Lady Starkey. t That I will, with pleasure, she rejoined. 0, Well, if this arrangement should be carried I u,s hope it may be satisfactory to evc-ry- Jj^y, and above all, beneficial to Mildred," said ^â anley. Here comes Lady Talmash. Perhaps »iay go with us. Your ladyship has come ost Qprojyos. Are you inclined to spend the mter at Nice ? Because I intend to take Mildred *rei and give her the advantage of the climate, d shall be delighted if you will join the party." should really like it very much, and think arH would be serviceable to myself. If you « Mildred desire it, I will go with you." to f-k am very fdad to hear it, and shall hold you <- he engagement," said Stanley. "I need tell you we shall live very quietly, and j 0i ,?'ll excitement, but yon can do just as yon dine at the table d'hote, go to balls, concerts, ^lace^^eS' and mix in all the dissipations of the "Por;siblý I may. I shall not lay down any 11p- but no what seems aerreeable at the t I' time. On one thing you may rely, I shall not ex- pect you constantly to attend on me." I Had you intimated any such wish, I should have, been obliged to excuse myself. Mildred will require all my care, and I mean to devote myself to her." I entirely approve of your resolution, and I think it does you great credit. Under such cir- cumstances as these, I shall be enchanted to form one of the party. Lady Starkey, I suppose, is not going with you." "No. Her ladyship prefers staying at Beau- cliffe, and will take care of the Squire." "Everything seems to be capitally arranged. I hope we shall be able to carry it out." <> While thus conversing, they had gradually ap- proached the house, and now entered the drawing room through the open window. CHAPTER LXV.âMa WARBURTON FOEKALLY ANNOUNCES HIS INTENDED MARRIAGE WITH LADY STARKEY. Next day, Mr Warburton and Lady Starkey had a loug tete-a-tete in the library, the result of which was a formal announcement on the part of the Squire that the engagement he had entered into with her ladyship would be speedily carried out. This announcement did not occasion much sur- prise, since tho probability of the marriage had been discussed by everybody, but it seemed to give general satisfaction, for her ladyship was much liked, and Mrs Twemlow, the housekeeper, Gios- sop, Ik>mi.nique and the two footman, tnougnt she would make a very good mistress.. Before coming-' to a decision, the ^Squire iiaa argued the matter with himself pretty much m this wav. I don't think I can do better than marrj hei ladyship, who will do me credit in every respect. She is » most lady-like, charming woman, and will make Beaucliffe what it used to be m former daysâa most ^.tractive and agreeable house. 1 feel I am quite safe with her. That unfortunate elopement has done us great mischief. 1 cannot explain it to everybody, and the only way to set it is to place an unmistakable lady at the head of the establishment. We shall all stand better when that is done. Besides, she has a clear three thousand a year, and that is not to be despised. On the whole, 1 think I ought to consider mr- self lucky; and I am chiefly fortunate in having gained a lady, who will sit so well at the head of my table. I fancy I see her there aiow. I am very glad poor dear Mildred is going to Nice, as it will prevent any possibility of mis- understanding between her and the new mistress of the house, and I daresay the party can be in- duced to set out for the south of France some two or three months earlier." These reflections were interrupted by the en- trance of the lady herself into the library, and no sooner did she appear than the gallant Squire hastened to meet her, and leading her to a sofa, sat down beside her. Your ladyship has had sufficient experience of Beaucliffe and its ways to know whether you are likely to be happy here. I will do all I can to make you so, and if devoted regard will content you, you shall have it. I should certainly never have taken another spouse, not even your lady- ship-if Mildred's marriage had turned out wellâ because there would inevitably have been a cer- tain rivalry between you which I could not have controlled. But now all will be pleasant, and my table will once more be graced by one who must command admiration and respect. I do not wish to flatter your ladyship, but the truth ought to be spoken. With regard to myself I will mention the sort of life I propose to lead. I shall live chiefly in the country, for the country suits me best, and I am used to it; and I am used to it; and I shall keep a certain amount of company, and I think your ladyship won't object." "Not in the least," she replied. "I shall like it." But though I shall endeavour to maintain the character I have acquired of a hearty country Squire, I shall not object to run up to town occasionally, and I should be very sorry indeed if your ladyship were to let your house in Berkeley Square." I should never think of letting it without some special reason," she replied. I am very fond of that house." Well, then we quite understand each other, and as nobody will interfere with us I think we shall do very well." I'm sure we shall," she replied. "And now let me ask you a question. Do you wish our nup- tials to take place here or in town ?" I don't care," he replied. But I should like them to be very quiet wherever they occur." "Just my own feeling," replied her ladyship. I could not bear a grand wedding, and I really believe all may be managed more quietly in town than here. Shall we go to St George's?" "Nothing can be done quietly there," replied the Squire, laughing. I picture to myself half I the Square full of splendid carriages, with any number of gorgeously attired lacqueys collected on the steps." Don't be alarmed," said her ladyship. If we are married at St. George's the business shall be very quietly conducted. That I promise you." "Then I agree. But I couldn't stand a regular West-end wedding. I'm too old for it." Your taste shall be consulted," she rejoined. I suppose you won't have a great dejeuner ?" "What for? if there will be so few guests to partake of it. But I leave all to you." In my opinion the first thing to be settled," said Lady Starkey, is the journey to Nice. As soon as they are gone there will be no more inter- ference, and you can make any arrangements you think proper. Get them off as soon as you can. If the journey is delayed till the winter something will occur to interfere with it, and it may never take place at all." I quite agree with your ladyship that it will be best for them to start as soon as they can, and I think this desirable object may be accomplished without any great difficulty. Let us see whether I any of them are on the lawn." On walking forth they found the whole party assembled there. To their great satisfaction Mildred and Sister Aline had expressed a strong desire to proceed to the shores of the Mediter- ranean without delay. If I go there immediately I may derive some benefit," said Mildred to Stanley, but if I wait till the winter, I believe it will be too late." At all events you can prolong your visit if you find the climate suits you." said Stanley. It is quite clear you derive no real benefit from your stay here." "I cannot perceive any improvement, I con- fess," said Sister Aline. But the shores of the Mediterranean may really benefit her, and there- fore ought to be tried." I am confident the climate will cure her, said Rose. I am confident the climate will cure her, said Rose. I don't like to offer an opinion, said Lady Starkey, I should think the late summer must be the best season for an invalid." "Let there beno delay whatever," said the Squire. Since everybody fancies Nice, try it. If it suits you, remain there, if you don't improve after a tair trialâsay two or three monthsâcome back." "Our preparations for early departure must immediately be made," said Stanley. "I should think you can all be ready in a week." "In half that time," Rose replied. While this conversation was going on the Squire had looked anxiously at Mildred, and became ap- prehensive that her life would not be long, what- ever benefit she might derive from a milder climate. Greatly moved, lie took her hand, and led her to some distance from the others. Tell me frankly, my dear child," he said. You are certain that you desire this proposed journey to the south of France ?" I like the notion of it exceedingly, dearest papa, and feci almost certain that I shall benefit by it. My chief fear is that my strength may not last." Looking at her with indescribable tenderness, the Squire said, If, instead of regaining strength, you become more feeble, not remain there till it may be too late to move, but returnâpromise me that!" "I promise it," she replied. "I would fain breathe my last at Beaucliffe, and I will not put off my return here till it may be impossible." Overcome by his feelings, Mr Warburton re- mained silent for a few minutes, and then asked in broken accents, Is there anything you would have done during your absence ? I only wish you to see that my horses are cared for," she replied. Never again shall I mount one of my favourite huntersâbut I still love them as much as ever." Don't despair, my darling," said the Squire. I scarcely dare hold out hopes, but I trust your strength may return, and that you may be able to ride as boldly as in former days." Never, dear papa. I do not expect it. But I do not wish my stables broken up." "Rest easy about that. Not a single horse shall be sold or given away, without your permis- sion. But I ought to prepare you. When you come back, you will find Bcaucliffe changed in gome respects." There will be a new mistress of the houseâ ha she rojoined. It cost me a pfmg at first. But I am now reconciled to it. Y ou could not have chosen better." You really think so?" I do," she replied. I fully believe Lady Starkey will make you happy, and I shall be happy to see you so." I believe the housse will be more comfortable than it has been of late, for I need scarcely tell you it ;has been very unsettled." "I know itâI know itâ^nd I also know how valuable to you will be Lady Starkey s experience and management." "Just my feeling," replied the Squire. "But now to come back to your proposed journey to the south of Fra«ce. I shall foel better satisfied if I have a good, sound, medical opinion as to the benefit to be derived from the change, and I shall, therefore, send a telegraphic message to Dr. Baguiey, of Chester, begging him to come over here to-morrow to meet Mr Newton, our old .surgeon, so that they may bold cOllsultation together on your case. What say you. darling ?" You know the great dislike I have to be governed by medical opinions, papa." y e, you have shown it by constantly refusing to see Mr Newton, but you must submit now. or I may be blamed." "Very well, send for the doctors, and I will see them but I must state beforehand that whatever they may say, I won't give up my proposed journey to Nice." k Then you are bent upon going?" Quite determined, and I really think-I shall be best out of the way for a few months, till you get certain affairs settled." Well, come back to the others," said the Squire, and I will go and send my telegram to Chester, and a mounted messenger to Mr Newton." ¡ CHAPTER LXVI.â A MEDICAL CONSULTATION l AND ITS RESULT. Next morning at eleven o'clock Dr. Bagufey (I and Mr Newton answered the summons they had received and were ushered by Glo^op into the library, where they found Mr Warburton. Both had a large country practice, and were men hi considerable ability. Neither had seen Mrs Stanley Brereton since her return to Beaucliffe, and there was something mysterious in her con- duct which perplexed them. I wish to consult you, gentlemen, about my daughter, Mrs Stanley Brereton," said the Squire. As you will see presently, she is in a very deli- cate state of th-coUfmn.1Dtion- I foa>~âand believes she would be mch" benefitted by passing a couple of months at N:IC..d B gulev "But I have no doubt of It, sal 3; ^-ffiuld^coSmenT^Lt her departure be de'aved for two or three months," said Mr New- ton 7 "She vvUl gain nothing. Our own climate jU'' BuTshe^Suade^ hereelfthat her only hope -t{n an immediate change," said the Squire She believes she will not live till the 'mSVhS'of the Mediterranean are not without danger," remarked Dr. Baguley. The mistral frequently prevails there at this time of year, and tliat wind is very dangerous to invalids. Just then the door was opened by the butler, and Mildred came in, accompanied by Stanley. The two medical men, who were seated, imme- diately arpse and advanced to meet her, both being extremely struck by her delicate appearance. After regarding her for a few minutes, they consulted each other by a look, the result of which was not very favourable to the invalid. Dr. Baguley likewise felt her pulse, and shook his head. You will do better where you are than by going to Nice," he remarked. Decidedly," said Mr Newton. I recommend you to keep quiet." But my wife believes that her life may be saved by a visit to Nice," said Stanley. I do," she said. And I am certain I am doomed if I remain here." Y ou are mistaken," said Dr. Baguley. I â could not advise you to go to Nice nowânor could Mr Newton." Certainly not," replied the other. But I mean to go, whatever may be the conse- quences," said Mildred. You must not permit you wife tQsacrifice her- self thus, sir," said Mr Newton. I really cannot help it, gentlemen," rejoined Stanley. She is determined to go, and I think opposition may do more harm than good." Of course, a great deal will depend upon the weather," remarked Dr. Baguley. "If it hap- pens to be favourable she may do very well, but my chief fear is from the dry north-west windâor mistralâshould that prevail. There are several very able physicians at Nice, so you are always sure of good advice." I am very glad to hear that," replied the Squire. "Have you any further questions to ask me, gentlemen?" said Mildred. "If not, I will retire." No, there is no need to detain you, madam," replied Mr Newton, gravely." We have all the information we require, and Dr. Baguley and my- self will consult together before our departure, and write out a few prescriptions which we will leave with your husband." We need not advise you to be very careful," said Dr. Baguley. Your life depends upon your ware." Mildred then quitted the room, attended by Stanley, who returned in a few minutes, and found the two medical men seated at a writing table, engaged in deep consultation, and looking very grave. I very much doubt whether you will be able to bring your wife back alive to England, Mr Brereton," said Dr. Baguley, giving him three or four prescriptions, which he had placed in the envelope. "Her case is a peculiar one, and I am afraid is already too far advanced to be checked. But she may be soothed, and that is important. We will see her again before her departure. "Pray do so," said Stanley. "We shall not start for a week, and you can pay her a couple more visits during that interval, so as to ascertain how she goes on." "We will come again on the day after to- morrow, and at the same time," said Mr Newton. They then took leave, and the servants in at- tendance were struck by their grave expression, as they proceeded to their carriages. When Mildred returned to her own room, she found Sister Aline and Rose waiting for her. What has been decided on ? said Rose, eaSe^jjâ¬y have given a very reluctant assent to my departure to Nice," replied Mildred. That I fully expected. They wanted to keep you here. But what do they think of your case ? asked Sister Aline. Very badly, I believe," replied Mildred. They scarcely gave me any hopes." Never mind! Keep up your spirits cried Rose. I believe you'll disappoint them both." "I have very poor hopes of recovery," said Mildred. I felt so ill just now, when I was under examination by the medical men, that I thought I should have died. They may come again, but I won t see them. Why not ? asked Rose. "I am sure they would cure you if they could." Perhaps so," rejoined Mildred. But they cannot." Just then, Stanley entered the room. I want you to take a short walk with me in the garden," he said. "It must be a very short walk, she replied, for I have not much strength left." Taking his arm she descended the back stairs, and went with him into the garden. Evidently he had something important to say to her, but'he hesitated to say it. I a in going to ask you a very serious ques- tion," he said. Forgive me if I am wrong, but it is important I should know the exact truth. Something I overheard said by the medical men just now awakened suspicions which I myself once entertained." She became as pale as death, and trembled in every limb. Let us sit down," he rejoined. Your strength IS fmlmg you. He led her to a bench as quickly as he could. As soon as she was seated she caught hold of his arm and, looking as if she would penetrate to his soul, said,â Now tell me what you suspected." Stanley answered in a low but distinct voiceâ Forgive me if I was wrong. But I suspected you had taken poisonâor, rather, I thought tnat poison had been given youâslow poison. I afte wards dismissed this opinion, but it has ju been revived by the remarks of the medical men. What did they say ?" she asked. "These were DrBalguley's exactwords," replied Stanley, I am convinced she is suffering from theeffects of slow poison.' 'Itlookslike it, I own,' replied the other, it cannot possibly be. "Dr. Baguley was right," said Mildred, in tones of the deepest remorse. I am suffering from the effects of poisonâpoison self-administeredâbut it failed in its object, and as left me as you see, to a miserable existence." "Gracious heaven! Is it possible ?" exclaimed Stanley, with a deep groan. Mildred made no reply-her sense forsook her, and she fell back utterly unconscious, on the bench. Stanley did not call for assistance, nor did he attempt to restore her., but watched by her side for nearly half an hour, when she revived. At first she was greatly confused, but she soon recovered sufficiently to be able to re-enter the house with her husband's support, and was de- livered over by him to Sister Aline's tender care. (To he continued)

A GOOD BTR0KE"0F BUSINESS.

HEROISM IN MEDICINE.

A MICHI(MN~YILL^OE IN ASHES.

WESTCROSS, A GLAMORGANSHIRE…

----------PECULIAR TRIAL FOR…

A CHICAGO GUNPOWDER j PLOT.…

THE WEATHER AND THE CROPS.

._-----.:1 VITRIOL WIN vj…

-__---FATALITIES AT SEA.

A WILL SUIT ARRANGED.;

---_-----------SHOCKING ACCIDENT…

EXPLOSION ON BOARD A SHIP.

SERIOUS TRAMWAY ACCI-' DENT…

THE CHILDREN'SHOUE: COLUMN…

Y GOLOFN GYMREIG .

AT EIN GOHEBWYR.

YR ANGEL.

YR AGERDD. ^

-----THE NEW SEAHAM COLLIERY…

THE TIN PLATE TRADE.

THE CONVERSION OF CYFARTHFA…