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Cardiff Pantomimes.

--------------A RUNAWAY TRAIN.…

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THE SIBERIAN MASSACRE.

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THE SIBERIAN MASSACRE. Exiles Killed by Soidiers. Story of an Eye-Witness. Full particulars are now to hand of the terrible maSSilcre of Siberian prisoners by Russian soldiery and police. The exiles were not the ordinary prisoners. They were exiled by administrative order"âthat is to say, they had not been tried and convicted by any tribunal. They were tbirty in number, and to reach Yakoutsk bad already per- formed a long and painful journey. Thrown pell- mell with common law criminals of the worst description, the mea, women, and children had been exposed, from stage to stage, to every hardship. The journey to Siberh has often been described, and it is, perhaps, net necessary to again insist on its horrors. The overcrowding of the "nan" or halting stages, (he iflth, the ] absence of all sanitary appliances, the insufficient number of plank beds, and the necessity for sonic of the prisoners sleeping on the bare earth-all these and many other sources of incessant suffer-j ing are familiar to those who have read something about the hard lot reserved for Russian political I prisoner?. Under such exposure (says a cone- spondent of the Times) even the strongest constitu- i tions often break down, and it was under clHdli- tions such as these that this small caravan j reached Yakoutsk, the chief town of Eastern Siberia. Here, at L's", they were able to sle^-p underaroofothprUDnthafofaprison.andhad; the pleasure of meetins; other exiles who had pre- j ceded them in their long journey, but to reach the further s'ations, such as Verkholansk and Kolimsk, greater hardships are irj store. Some 100 miles from Yakoutsk, at Ald.irre, the last | vestiges of civilisation disappear. The road i crosses an absolutely desert locality, where ai beit a few nomad tribes may be me*, though ti;P=e j for the most part have been d-cimated by smaii- pox, A RAIN OF BULLETS. It seems that with reference to these par- j ticular prisoners the new Vice-Governor of Yakoutsk had altered all the rules under which" administrative order" exiles arc governed. Considering that the new rules placed their lives in jeopardy, the exiles petitioned the i governor. Nuxt day they were told to call at the house of one d the exiles, which they did. There they met the subaltern of the police, n.rmpd Olessoff, to whom they explained unat'.r.rs. lie refused to hear their remarks, but, as they hssi- tatcd to accompany bim to the ofiices ot the Administration, he shouted, Then you reíu<e to follow me," and hurried troni the hou?e. ihpu commenced n shocking scene. One of tho->e pre- j sent thus deseiibes it. The house was in- stanily surrounded, and the jard thronged with troops and policmen. We Lad hardly time to open the door for them. Led by; all officer they rushed into the rooms, and we were crushed into a corner. There were about 70 soldiers, commanded by the ctiicer Karamline. Having been asked to accompany them to the Administration, the soLiiors did not wai for an j answer. They sprang upon the unfortunate exiles and struck them with their bayonets and j the butt-end'? of their gun?. In a moment several men fell among those who wete the nearest to the soldiers, and then shois were lited, and this again and again. It is impossible for me (f) dtsctibe the scene which f., kwed, or what I felt at this moment. 1 did not understand! how it was we were not ail killed; that some of us escaped seems a miracle. Tile soldiers, after the first at tack, rushed out into the yard, but the house was bombatded from ail tour stales. The bullets came in by the windows, and even penetrated through the thin \]1 Tin-re! was no slielter anywhere. We all wpjit into the! largest room of the house, and soii<e of us u ind lo j escape bj- the bock- door, bin tliost* | who opened it had hardly done so when they fell back dead and pii-r.'ed by s'-vtrai j bullets'. Chour, mad with terror, spia-.g into the i ) ;);.d, shouting Knough movt^ We sur- tender, but a pis'ol s'.o', ii.-ed ;.y the ofiic r K-i.amtine, brought hi:!1 d< \vr. Podbeisky, j a polilical ex le, who lived close i,y, :wd was quietiy .M'ting in his room, camCi Illnning out, when l e lietri the repou of lire. aim", to see what was happening. He had Iwrdly reached the court oci'ttpied by the soldiers when he was shot and killed. The eomman ler of j the garrison, VagolT, himself teiiiii-d bv this slaughter, had drawn his sword, ar.o running in front of his soldiers tried to make :be-m cease; firing. At this moment ttie ti> ve: ti-:r, Osia«htnef arrived in person, and perceiving t-he exile -Z >U/if, who had come out of the fo-mbuded h use, he tired at luni twice with his revolver a»id wounded hint. At this ex ample ihe fire ot ihe soldiers was renewed with grener energy. Their lury sfetned unlimited. Joseph Estrowitci>, « ho was wounded | and was motionless on the gr -und, \Y'IS attacked by tIle soldiers and tvmn-Ucd several- titr.es. i AFTER THE SLAUGHTER. De-Ciibing tile sc-sne aft^r the-laughter,the eye- witness says that he saw the dead body of one of hill comrades dragged out ot the house by his feet. and violently thrown across a sledge, I'odbelsky, | who was still breathing, was thiown ill witll the dead. I was at tiiat moment." lie says, 'â¢!> ing down in a sledge 1I:;¡t was to convey me to the prison. I fhouted with all my strength that Podbeisky was still alive. I b,!g,e(i .lie (j intervene, but. he paid wj attention to what I said, j A person passing by heard my cries, and, having made some inquiri's, it was on his intercession; that the dying man 'A' it sscp-.ira,p,.i from I the dead. When we approached the hospital prison we met the escort that was conveying to pti'on those of our fl if nds wlio were riot wounded. 'What is tile Ilse.' exe,'aiule!-] of IlI(-Se soldiers to the men of our escort, "of encumber- j ing the hospital with thai, riff-raft ? You would j have done much better to have killed them off at "oce." The doctors will see to that," replied out men. After some weeks a comt-martia! was oidered. This was a very feeble affair, nnd arranged so that the. authorities might escape. Three of tits exiles were condemned tocha'hii four o'li'-rs were sentenced to penal servitude for i life, and fix for t'venty year?. Four women j âamong whom was the wife of Bernsteinâ â were condemned to hard labour for fifteen ypa!" one only to penal servitude for ten year?, two for eight years, and the young gj, I, Eugenie Gourewitch, who wns betrothed to Zoioff, and whose sister had been killed,to t-ix year.4. Mademoiselle Zoroaslroff, wi.o was also engaged to one of the exiles, and who was wounoed, together with two men, wis sentenceU to lose ail civil ,n(i to t,, the limits of tiie Yakoutsk .lis:tier. One piisoner only I escaped with three years' imprisonment, and Nndaieft'. who came up when all was over, was the only person acquitted. The threo men con- j demned to dra'h were taken away from? their friends and put in ?epa:ate cells. On the 19LIJ ot August they weie removed to a military post, whence they cuuid sea all the preparations made for thpir execution, but they were allowed during the night (o receive visits from their wives and betrothed. Z,)t,,ff iiis wi,i -cat composure. Bernstein, riddled by four bullets, who had Leen borne on his bed to the court- martial, was conveyed in the same way to the gaUows. When the rope had been fixed round his neck the bed was taken away and he was left tr lang. During the massacre six of the exiles and one policeman were killed." _OT

LITTLE GIRL BURNT TO ! DEATH.…

_____ ——t DEAD IN A RAILWAY…

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CANON BELL ON THE SEALSKIN…

EXTRAORDINARY SCENE ON LIVERPOOL…

------,---,.._---I THE PRINCESS…

A BIRD WITH FOUR FEET.¡

THRILLING STORY OF A I WRECK.I

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THE PRINCE OF WALES AS i A…

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