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GREAT SNOWSTORMS IN ENGLAND…

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GREAT SNOWSTORMS IN ENG- LAND AND WALES. DESTRUCTION OF TELEGRAPH AND TELEPHONE WIRES. COMMUNICATION INTERRUPTED. The change in the temperature which set in on Monday night has continued, and on Wednesday the Metropolis and various parts of the Midlands and South Wales were visited by snowstorms of unusual severity, in many places the snow lying to the depth of many inches. With the high wind which had prevailed at the time drifts were formed in many districts, causing great inconvenience to traffic generally. In addition to this, the weight of the snow has broken telegraph and telephone wires, rendering communication between Loudon and the provinces very irregular. Cardiff, as well as other parts of South Wales and Monmouthshire, experienced the same extraordinary snowstorm. In the former town during the greater portion of Wednesday snow fell heavily, but, owing to the wet state of the streets, did not settle. At night frost set in, rendering the roads as hard as iron. LONDON. The most severe snowstorm that has been expe- rienced in London and the neighbourhood since January, 1881, visited the Metropolis and the South and West of England on Wednesday. From the hour of five or six in the morning snow fell con- tinuously over the whole of the Metropolis until one o'clock in the afternoon, and before traffic had commenced there was a thick layer of snow on the ground. The morning trains on the suburban lines and the tramway cars of the systems on both sides of the Thames began to run as usual, but the services could not be sustained with any regularity in consequence of the quantity of snow which clogged the rails. Additional horses were em- ployed in many districts, but even then the cars could only run slowly and at irregular intervals. On the railways there were also long delays, chiefly caused by accumulations of snow on the telegraph wires connected with the signalling apparatus. The whole of the permanent way staffs of the principal termini were called out to assist in arrangements for the safe working of the traffic, and hundreds of men out of employment found work in clearing the rails in the vicinity of railway stations of snow. The principal damage done was to the wires of the telephone exchanges and the overhead wires of the Post-office, which were broken in all directions by the weight of the snow, some of the streets of the City and West-end presenting an extraordinary aspect from the quantity of broken and tangled wires that de- pended from the roofs of the houses across the streets, the broken ends, in some cases, swaying about in mid-air, and constituting a lively source of danger to both foot passengers and riders on omnibuses. The principal inconvenience was caused by the breakages to the telephone exchanges, as most of the London District Post-office wires are underground. Those in the suburbs and many long-distance wires, however, suffered conside- rably, and communication was delayed between London and the South, South-East, South-West, and West of England and South Wales. The high roads leading to London at Feltham, Hounslow, and Twickenham were rendered almost impassable by snowdrifts several feet deep, and market gardeners' wagons were for hours snowed up. THE MIDLANDS. After a week of warm, spring-like weather, with the thermometer ranging between 40deg. and 50deg., a spell of frost set in in Birmingham and the district on Monday evening, and about ten o'clock on Tuesday morning a heavy fall of snow commenced, and was still falling in a thick shower at mid-dav. KENT. In Kent the fall was deep in the neighbourhood of Faversham and Sittingbourne, while at Wool- wich and Dartford also there was a heavy fall. The telegraph wires between London and Wool- wich were broken, and communication was en- tirelv suspended. GLOUCESTERSHIRE. In Gloucestershire the fall was so heavy as to put almost an entire stop to traffic, and interfered with ordinary business pursuits. DEVONSHIRE. The storm did not reach Devonshire until the afternoon, when a storm of rain, hail, and, finaly, snow descended for a time, when a thaw set in. THE MIDLANDS. At heavy snowstorm prevails throughout the Midland and Southern Counties. WARWICK. At Warwick snow lies to the depth of several inches, but a thaw has now set in. OXFORD. At Oxford one foot of snow fell on Wednesday. The tramcars have been unable to run. ALDERSHOT. A tremendous snowstorm raged over the camp and town of Aldershot on Wednesday. The snow is six inches in depth, and the storm appears likely to continue. CARDIFF The town of Cardiff and the surrounding dis- trict were visited by a severe snowstorm on Wed- nesday morning, which lasted for a considerable time. About mid-day, however, the atmosphere became clear and a cold, north-east wind set it. VAYNOR. The weather on Tuesday night was extremely cold and severe, and on Wednesday morning the wholecounti-y was covered with snow. At the time of writing there are nine inches of snow on the ground, all the trains are late, and heavy traffic on the country roads is impossible. At nine o'clock the snow was still coming down. Oes un a wyr lis lonavvr, Pit ryw 111 sy'n poeri 'lawr? MONMOUTH. During Tuesday night and Wednesday morning a tremendous snowstorm took place in this district, and continued up to noon. The hills around the town are covered to the depth of 2ft. and over, the drifts in places being very deep. The streets are so covered that traffic and business are nearly sus- pended. The morning mail was over two hours late. BRYNMAWR. A heavy fall of snow has taken place, but the roads, &c., between this town and Abergavenny in one direction and Merthyr in the other are in a fair condition. RHYMNEY VALLEY. The weather throughout Tuesday was dirty and squally, with occasional showers of sleet and hail- stones. Towards evening it became considerably calmer, and the air was quite frosty at night, the wind having veered round to the north. Early on Wednesday morning a thick fall of snow set in, which soon covered the grotind. The storm became stronger towards nine o'clock, and lasted for some three hours, the wind driving the "fleecy element" with blinding force in all directions, while a cold, piercing wind blew from the Dorth, and at one time there was every indication of the snow drifting, as the north wind was strong. Towards mid-day the snowstorm, however, abated. As evening set in the wind continued to blow with great force at times, and there is every appearance of a sharp frost. Snow to the depth of several inches is lying on the ground, and in the upper part of the valley there is a consider- able depth in many places. Notwithstanding the storm, the trains on the local railways have worked throughout the whole day tolerably regularly. Out of door work in most cases had to be suspended early in the morning. TAFF BARGOED. Early on Wednesday morning it commenced to snow in this valley, and the storm lasted for some time, and the wind drifted the fleecy element in all directions. The cold was bitter, a sharp north wind blowing the greater part of the day, and as the evening set in the air was frosty. ABERGAVENNY. Snow commenced falling on Wednesday between two and three a.m., and by noon about nine inches lay on the ground. In the afternoon a sharp frost set in. MERTHYR. The downfall of snow at Merthyr occasioned considerable inconvenience, inasmuch as vehicles were unable to proceed to Dowlais. In the even- ing a frost set in, and some of the footways were so slippery that pedestrians had to exercise great care to prevent themselves from falling. NEWPORT AND DISTRICT. Snow fell heavily at Newport and in the surrounding country on Wednesday up to about noon. In the town it did not lie long, but thawed and rendered the streets most uncomfortable. In the country, however, the ground was covered to a considerable depth. From Newport in the direction of Usk the snow was half a foot deep. TREDEGAR. On Tuesday night a heavy snowstorm com- menced, which raged over the town and district up to mid-day on Wednesday, causing a great depth of snow to accumulate in the streets. CARDIGAN. A heavy snowstorm occurred at Cardigan on Wednesday, with the wind blowing a complete gale from the north-east. Snow lay several inches deep on the ground, and the telegraph wire from Cardigan to St. Dogmael's was broken by the force of the storm. NORTH WALES. Snow and sleet, accompanied by severe gales of wind, prevailed over North Wales throughout Tuesday. The mountain ranges are covered with snow for many miles.

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