Hide Articles List

34 articles on this Page

fe\V A'- a fc. 'X

1 XCIE PROSECUTION AT SWANSEA.

THE EVANS WILL SUIT.

[No title]

! 'ill.:, t ¡ VVaLEB i n*…

TRADE REPORTS.

[No title]

I7KS CKAJCELLOS OF THE EXCHEQliKS!…

News
Cite
Share

I 7KS CKAJCELLOS OF THE EXCHEQliKS! AT STK0U1). .I. ) tJ L {).l kJ A j l,-1 U D. (" TSEfJS Trii^GEAiI ) STROUD, TnusHDAr. Tha Chancellor of tbe Exchequer 4,,ii preseata1 the Hnrual di"ner of tha Stroud Conaervativo Be; fit Society, w ich waa pi/en iu the hg:, hal: of tbe Subeorip-.icn ixoome on Thurad-iy eveaia^r. The right hon. ge-etltfcan, who left Londoi by the three o'clock i e.m from Paddington, arrived at Stroud Station thortly before six o'clock. He wi-B loudly cheered by a Urge orowd who had assembled in the station yard; and as soon &,a he bad entered the carriage which had been kept in waiting for him, the horses were unharnessed, and the vehicle was drawn to the Subscription Rwma by the people, there being a numerous escort of torch bearers. The dinner was presided over by Mr. J. E. Doting ton, the Conservative candidate for Stroud. The general company numbared about GOO. In responding to the toast of "Her Majesty's Ministers," which was proposed by Mr. Reginald York, M.P., The CHANCELLOR of the Exchequer, who was received with loud and long.oontmued cheering, said it was highly gratifying to him to have received so hearty a welcome from those who tocpk so live y an interest in political quatitions, in a borongb, too, that had placed so important a part in the recent political history of the country. They were now approaching an eleotion- uuder circumstftLcee that must fill them with anxiety. If it wtre a mere question its between uord BeBCOiifcfisid and the Marqueaa of Hariiugton or jk!r. Glstdstono it would be comparatively unim- portant, but tha coming struuyie was anxiously watched from abroad by nations who were deeply interested in the gieat ia.?nea depending on it. It Wfcs, therefore, comforting to know tbat there Tttte throughout tho country large bodied of v.citiig men, lOèmited to the franchise by Lird He..corufield, who were bringing their inieliigeut action to bear on the politics cf tie day. They ban recently had ati tuoruous mass of eloquenja poured form in Scotland, &t d, ou!y the other day, one of tbe annual tuckets of the rac-mbar f jr Oxford, wLo uppearei to etn.ulare the post of Zadkitl. T bin political Zadkiel was in tie habit of eadoreing his last year's predictions by stating tha: events had b; en their verifio»ti jn, but, if tbo teat were ptvictly an"101, it w. ul-i he FHn, sain regard to bia pradicfiin^, tiat they had not t,, en 1 infilled. Bat pfe. disti. h i so vague tbat tiif-y were gun^rilly very dflSculfc to deal nith. As to Mr. Gladstone, he (tie Chancellor cf the Exchequer) hid answered his c-rilioi^aig, and since then Mr. Gi-deto,-o had, in a n ae to ha Eiinjurgh speeoh, wfoived the further disoutsioa until PiJor. h&ment re-affSfiiibl d. Waat the present Govern. t'ent cl< imcd crndit fo' waa the! taey had done vho best they could tor the country; and they believed the majority of the pe.)Ile gave thua. credit for th:e, &rd it waa unfair, no. Ki ghh. and unpatrictia, to hea.) oa the Government charts of bad ftiit-h baoiu^a they difieied from those who desired to takj their places. The Gove-ntnetn had desired to support its institutions of tho country, and were antioua tc give the people fair play in the usa of those institutions, 'LJÃB was tha spirit in wtiijh ha believed the country spptoacsed the p ilitio&l questions cf the df-y- The J4iui:-try br-iug-ht no eHrge against otherf, but as to the foreign policy of the late Government he believed the Ea-jliah people were agreed that they had produced a bad in,p!s1Ãr,n abroad, bit W. Harcourt had ceferrod to the recessity of keeping tha Dardanelles neutral, but this all alut).4 boqn the aotion of the Government, and he aeked was it not the ample action of the Government which turned back the liustianarcay from the gate.? of Constaatinopl*? It was true that the foreign palioy of this country had been made to look ridiculous in the eyaa of J-Lurope, but he contended that it was the juibeitsla who had brought abjut that result. As far as tho foreign policy of the present Go/em- inent was concerned it had a totally diffdrent (ff, et, while it had received the enaoraement of by far the greater portion of the English peipla. With regard to queaticms affjoting d >m^atic legislation the aim of the Government hd bel1 to help ice people to do what they could for their own improvement, and to foster a spirit of self. reliance tind kelf-reetraint throughout the oouatry. Ihey felt that the State might usefully point tha and remove obstacles to the progress of self, improvement, and tbis prinoiple they had followed in their legislation. With regard to friendly sooietieB, artisans' dwellings, the S'nitary con- dition cf the kingdom, the amen imenta male in ttae Poor Lp.w, and other matters affecting sooiil life, they had not thought it right to adopt the prinoiple of paternal government that was witnessed in ctr-aio othor Earopaan c)unt-ies. During the time the present G) 7pr-imant had held office England had passed through a period that Ltd been marked '\>lith many ditliaultiea and ciflauiitiea. Th.y onoceeled to power at a time fallowing a period dariag whioh there had been a great and unhealthy and excess've outburst of speculation and excitement; a titn3 when prosperity was said to have advanced by leaps and bounds. That period waa, hovavar, followed by one of reao-ion, in which those who bad previously gone too far had euffored con- siderably. Some persons had said thia was tha fault cf tbe Conservative Government. For his part ho thought it was raVisr attributable to the Governmsst that had etiraa. lated the excitement whioh had caa *ed tha roao tion. Lord Derby had recently d^tirered an -Ole speech, giving an eucruragiug vi>w oftao pi-jjent c nniaercial position, though ha had gooe a little wild in impljirg that there waa a gri tf, djsira for gunpowder and plory, a statement taat was in no i(Df, fchaied by bii late clieagued. Oa tha con- trary, they detirad aa little ga^po vd;r aid &{IJry as waa Cm:It:B:.mt with the safety aad hon-ia? of He Empire. For himself be (Sr S. Nortbcote) believed the country hid pi^aad through tia worat; that a revival had citnmanceds although he warned the poopb not to expect that it would ba r-yid and at once. Above all tbinga, h ur?od the country not to indulge in the trial of false remtrums. Seme persona were for protection, others were for turning out the Government. But he believed that whethsr they went back to protec- tion, or turned out the Government in hopea of better times, they would be equally disappointed. What they wanted was self reiianoo and faith in their country, and as lorg as they kept this faith e,nd refused to be led away by demagogues and cgitators, the fate cf the oountry waa in thair own hari-as and secure. He had heard that Sir William Harcourt was expected to come to Stroud, and thst he was to ba kcoompanied by another member of the Liberal party (Mr. John Bright) Thiu was a very prudent arrangement on the part of tho Liberal leaders, for he remembered Mr. Bright gave advice once in the Houae of Commons which would be of extreme advantage to bis colleague, Sir William Harcourt, and the advice was taken from a witty American poet who said, D"n't never prophecy unless you know." (Loud laughter.) Thora waa another tubjeofcupon which be desired to Ray a few words. They were all aware that the condition of Ireland at the present moment was the oauaa of graiit interest and anxiety in this country. They huarl reports of the dietresa which prevailed ia the country, and be waa afraid they would hear still more of it. There could ba no doubt that, although in aany parts of Ireland the condition of the country waq by no rnema unfavourable, and although in some parta it wab even better than in some parta of England, yet it was perfectly true that there were portious, especially of the West Coast of Ireland, and other districts also, in which there waa a great failure of the usual means of sustenauca, and in which there was great difficulty in finding employment for the people. He could not at preaeat enter fuliy into the question, but he wished to assura them, and through them to assure others, tbat this was a matter which had from the tirfot engaged the moat serious attention of her Majesty's Government. There were kon,e persons who thonght it to their interest to represent the Government a8 sitting with their hands folded denying that there waa any distress, and oaring nothing for what might ccme. Now, that was certainly not the oase, for evev since their attention waa drawn to the state of the country they had been examining in what j way aeuBtaLoe might be properly given without endangering the position of the people by de. moralising them, and rendering them too much paupers. Various things they had already done. As far back as November laat instructions were given to all the boards of guardians to make proper provisions for the supplies whieh might be required of food and of fuel which was lively to fall short. A" the same time encouragement was given to them to dispense with such portions of the law as might be found embarrassing in the administration of propar relief, with the full and clear understanding if they should find it neoeasary to suspend such prevision the Government would ask Parliament (in its assembling for a bill of indemnity. At the same time, in order to promote the employ. ment of the people, offers were made of advances to landlords of a more liberal character and on more favourable terms than even the favourable terms upon which they were usually made, and the Government stated that it would ba their intention to propose to Parliament when it mat a bill of indemnity for that whiou they might have dona outside the law. He believed to a certain extent these treasures have borne fruit. At the eame time we bad heard the advances which had been asked for, from,ca.oifea which it is not difficult to guess at, had been still benind what they mipht have been, therefore within the last wflelc or 10 days they had again been in communication with the Irish authorities. The Government had issued directions that up to a limited sum advances should be made in the distressed districts, upon terms which for the first two years wouid be absolutely nominal, and would afterwards be at little more than a nominal rate, viz., at the rate of 1 per oeat. rer annum. These were stepa wh oh had baen Lten they knew beyond tbe power they had at law but taken in the full confidence that Parlia- ment would ratify what they had endeavoured to do for the saving of .life aadfortha assuaging rr.if.f.rv in the Bister country. (Cheera.) Thev^knew very well that the action of the agita- tors wasnot thf action which was likely to benefit thâMW.tr,. bat,00 tog" b»k of against te .G<Jverultn.t and 'n people, th6y wruld Lot su embitter: g the Ej3gli2tt people agairst the great body of the Iriah. (CheerL,,) 'J'he E4gl[ih might condemn, and £ tL1 elh the not of Eisland but of Ireland hercelt, the action cf those who were doing such parmoioua wovk they believed them to ba but a few moo, of far lees influence than they suppoae «hea«elvoa to be; bus tbey airfht »ly upon it taeir aot n would be in ev<,iy poteiole way couu.era.ted Dy tbo aolioii of tho Bi'ifculi jti £ t In c clus-ir-ii. tho Chancellor oi tuo Exoioq.wr r'.iferrtu o fvieroiy eo -ieties, unci exprocaad his great aomv"'5*i.>n for tbora. Tbe L<gvnil m-?.B returned Ma eeit amidst i ud tittrs, j

LOSS OF A SWANSEA. V

""'Q1A8------.. ---------BLSHRANGING…

THE CHARGE OF SHEEP STEALING…

ROYALTY" SKY-LARKING."

ImQCKn.Q RAILWAY COLLISION…

A GHOST STOhY OF TO-DAY.

SOUTH WALES INSTITUTE OF ENGINEERS.

-HEAVY SENTENCES ON CRIMINALS.

- A BRISTOL ELOPEMENT.

»^TLiUGG.L'ii Vv"!lii A K-D…

THE MYSTERIOUS DISAPPEARANCE…

THE CAI'E AND NATAL MAIL JLO-.RVIOE.

FUNERAL OF THE LAIS SEEJSANT…

BEISTOL AND WEST OF ENGLAND…

[No title]

THE TaY BHlDGS DI^ASTEE.

11 e JY: L a i) i- K u - A…

MURDER AND SUICIDE IN SWITZERLAND.…

[No title]

[No title]

[No title]

AbWf:h TO U >li«.jfi.SP02MDE5sT-?.

IIA RUJi WITH TH&ULAM JitttAN-MiiRE…

APPU NIJMKlsT OF CLERK OF…

THE SP £ ING ASSIZE.".

NLWPOhT SCHOOL B )AS1> Li…