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CORWEN.

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BORTH.

LAMPETER.

PONTRHYDYGROES.

DOLGELLEY.

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PWLLHELI.

.PENRHYNDEUDRAETH.

PORTMADOC.

WEM

ELLESMERE

CHIRK.

LLANWNOG.

LLANGURIG.

CEFN AND RHOSYMEDRE.i

iHANMER

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CARDIGANSHIRE ASSIZES.

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ABERYSTWYTH MARKET.âWheat sold at «9. 6d. to 7s. 6d. V â lbs.; barley, 4s. Od. to 4s. 6d.; oats, 3s. Od. to 3s. !>d.; eg/s, 14 f jr a shillins; salt butter, 100. to Hid.$lb.; fresh butter, Is. Id. to Is. 3d. 10 tb.; fowls, 3s. Od. to 4s. od. 40 couple; ducks, 4s. Od. to 2s. Od.; geese, 4s. Od. to 5s. 6d. turkeys, 5s. Od. to 7s. 6d. each; potatoes, Os. Od. to 3s. Od. THE BISHOP OP MELANESIA AT OSWESTRY PARISH CHURCH.âOn Sunday evening, January 19, the Bishop of Melanesia (Dr. Selwyn) preacherl a sermon in the Parish Church to a very large congregation. The Bishop took his text from St. Matthew, 10th chap. and 8th verse, "Freely ye have received, freely give." In the course of his sermon he said that they in England were so accustomed to their means of grace that they were apt to grow care- less about them. He himself had for the last six years been brought face to face with those who had no idea of God. His work lay on the western fringe of the Pacific, amongst the inhabitants of a long chain of islands running up to within about a thousand miles of the Eastern shore of Australasia. They were a rude, but fine race of men, active in their habits, not degraded specimens of humanity, but able and willing to learn, and able and willing to work. When his (the Bishop's) father was sent out to New Zea- land in 1841, he was bidden by the then Archbishop of Canterbury to regard New Zealand not only as itself a field of mission work, but as a fountain from which the Water of Life might flow out to the then unvisited islands of the Pacific. Thongh his single diocese was as big as Eng- land and Wales put together, and was surrounded by stormy seas, he yet endeavoured to lay the foundation of a work which might endure amongst those distant islands. He went about in his little vessel amongst the different islands, and went ashore unarmed among men who were armed to the teeth, and who had hardly ever seen a white man before, and he so won th1 bv his presence, by his gentleness, and his devotion, that they were willing to entrust their children to him to be brought up and edu- cated in New Zealand. So the work gradually went on until the year 1855, when Bishop Pattison, who was not then consecrated, joined him, and afterwards carried on the work on the lines which had been laid down. He saw how varied these islands-some hundred in numberâwere in their natural character and situation and in language. Almost every village had a different dialect, many of them a different language from the rest. Their roads were but mountain paths, trodden one by one in Indian file, by those who passed along them, and the Bishop came to the conclusion that it was hopeless to expect Englishmen to evangelize these people, and that the only way of doing it was BJ forming a central school for the training of young natives from the different islands, and then to sendthem forth amongst their own countrymen, at the same time having a white man stationed, wherever it was possible, to guide, direct, and strengthen them. These were the lines upon which the work was being carried on. Broadly speaking, the condition of the people of these islands was one of abject fear. They trusted nobody, they feared everybody. They had no idea of God, but they had a belief in a spirit world peopled mainly by the souls of their ancestors, to whom they offered sacrifices and prayers. Their religion was to them not a source of peace, but of fear; for each man feared not only his neighbour but his neighbour's god. Their superstitious beliefs in witchcraft and sorcery was the fruitful sauce of bloodshed and crimes of revenge. After giving some instances of this from his own personal observation, the Bishop described the character and work of the mission. He said he had now seven clergy- men, six of them deacons and one priest, working in different stations, and a great many teachers of different grades employed in the schools. Wherever the native clergy and teachers were supported by a white clergyman, the mission worked admirably, and they had great success, and in the other islands, when he had visited them quite unexpectedly, he had found the native teachers sticking to their posts, the church bells ringing, the congregations assembled for worship, the class of catechumens ready to meet afterwards, and everything going on in the same orderly way as in the school at Norfolk Island, -'TILL, however, white men were wanted, and to obtain more white men was one great object of his present visit to this country. The Bishop concluded an impressive and inter- esting sermon by speaking of the greatness of the responsi- bility involved in the far-reaching influence and power of England, in the ramifications of her trade and commerce, and in the vnstness of her possessions AND resources, and bv appealing to his hearers to do all that lay in theIr power to spread forth amongst men the knowledge of ths Gospel of Christ. A collection was made at the close of the service in behalf of the Melanesian Msssion.

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