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A STRYT ISSA.

COMMERCIAL FAILURES.

WALES IN DECEMBER.

FOOTBALL.

[No title]

THE COLLIERY DISASTER IN ,SOUTH…

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THE COLLIERY DISASTER IN SOUTH WALES. The appalling calamity that occurred on Wednes- day week has now been measured. The killed do not near the total estimated in our last issue, but the list of the dead, now accurately ascertained, is sufficiently terrible. It numbers 77, and besides these 9 lie wounded, and some of them beyond hope. That day and the next the air was filled with wailing for the dying and the dead; wives and mothers were wringing their hands and piteously moaning in every other house in the village. With most of them the spring of tears had soon dried up, and they presented an aspect of stricken sorrow even more pitiful than that of those who had still the relief of weeping. One by one the corpses were being carried home through the hushed street, whilst the villagers looked on in blank dismay. The lowered blinds indicated the destinations of the bearers. Women who were not themselves bereaved drew their breath convulsively as those corpses passed, and shuddered to think of the calamity they had so narrowly escaped. For many hours nearly all those poor creatures were victims of the most sickening apprehension, and, if many more than was expected had emerged from the Valley of the Shadow of Death, their hearts were all the more sympathetic for those whose fears had become dreadfully realised. The compilation of the death list was a sufficiently trying task, but the visitation of their homes had nearly unmanned those officials who were instructed to arrange for the reception of the bodies and discover the circumstances of each family. All the dead had been recovered by Friday, and the workings are now fit for resuming operations. In one house there has been accumulating a row of no less than eleven coffins, those of relatives and lodgers with them. In no other was there an array so numeri- cally appalling, but in very many the dead were far from being in the singular number. Everything that human sympathy could suggest was being done for the poor and bereaved, but their grief was beyond the reach of alleviation by human hands. Most of the 75 died from the effects of afterdamp, and, to judge from their looks, passed away without suffering, for their visages are placid, as if in sleep but in many instances severe burns and fractured thighs, legs, and heads had previously been suffered, the agony contorting the features. In some cases the injuries were frightful. One fine young fellow had been absolutely cut in two. The number who actually died in the pit was 75, the other two having died after being brought to the surface. Of the nine wounded, three are in a critical condition. At the time of the accident there were 773 men and boys in the colliery. About one in ten has therefore been lost. All the survivors were brought to the surface before midnight on Wednesday, and by breakfast time next morning the dead had been recovered. The North Wales quarrymen have sent to Mardy proffering assistance in the relief of the sufferers. The colliery proprietors have given ze300 and Lord Bute £ 200.

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LLANGOLLEN ADVERTISER OFFICE,…

~ RUABON.

BRYMBO AND BROUGHTON.

R RUTHIN.

T CEFN AND RHOSYMEDRE.

I ^ JOHNSTOWN.

.1tlt) GLYN CEIRIOG.

A DENBIGH.

4. LLANTYSILIO.

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LLANARMON DYFFRYN CEIRIOG.I

WREXHAM.

MR. H. L. SQUIRES ON THE DISESTABLISHMENT…

HOME & FOREIGN CHIT-CHAT.

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LOCAL MARKETS.

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