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THE RAILWAY TRAGEDY IN FRANCE.

MR. LESLIE ON THE ROYAL COLLEGE…

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MR. LESLIE ON THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF MUSIC. Speaking at a meeting held at Chester, on Monday, in aid of the proposed Royal College of Music, and which, though influentially attended, was adjourned to the time of the Yeomanry exercises, in the hope that the Prince of Wales would be present, Mr. Henry Leslie said that the important question of higher musical education had been working underground and out of sight ever since 1869, but the action of the princes at Manchester took an entirely new departure on this question. After explaining the work and objects of the Prince of Wales and the Duke of Edinburgh, Air. Leslie went on to observe that the Royal College of Music was intended to be a central institution in London, and to be the musical heart of the whole country, with a school of music in every town and every village, as far as possible. Whenever any great question of musical import cropped up, all the principals of these various schools would be summoned up to the musical parliament in London, as the institution was to be a thoroughly national one. (Hear, hear.) Students, to the number of 100, were to be educated free. From these students would be taken what were called scholars, who would have education, board, and lodgings free. Out of that body will be chosen students for fellowships of £100, £120, or Y,150 a year, to bridge over that time when a male or female should earn his or her living by teaching, singing, or performing as an avocation. Then there would be degrees, and it was intended to have as principals the cream of the musical talent of the country, so that in five or six years the standard of musical education would be raised immeasurably. (Hear, hear.) He alluded to an instance of talent which was hidden or neglected in the case of a young girl in Ruabon. He was sent for to hear her sing. He went, and found that she was only 15 years of age, that she had a lovely voice, extending from the low B flat to the high C, and indeed she had touched the high D. She had been in the habit of singing for one or two guineas, as the case might be, to support her parents. But all that was stopped, and he hoped to see her in the early ranks of the Musical College in London, and that she would one day become a Neilson or an Adelina Patti; or, if the worst came, she would be able to make from £300 to £ 400 a year. (Hear, hear.) In con- nection with the new scheme there would also be a great school of dramatic music and a chapel for ecclesiastical music, so that before long it would not be necessary for anyone to go abroad, and there would be a thoroughly artistic education within reach at home. To apply the epithet of unmusical" to England was only a farce. (Hear, hear.) Wherever he went he found music; if not existent, that was because it was not cultivated. He believed that by cultivating higher music they were carrying out the scriptural injunctionâ"Inasmuch as ye do this to one of these, ye do it unto me." (Applause.)

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