Hide Articles List

23 articles on this Page

[No title]

News
Cite
Share

ATTEMPT TO UPSET A WELSH TRAiN.-As the first morning passenger train, on Monday, on the Taff Vale Branch Railway, between Cowbridge and Pontypridd, was proceeding to Pontypridd, it was suddenly and voilently thrown off the rails. The passengers sustained a severe shock and general fright. Investigation showed that stones had been deliberately placed on the rails, with the daring purpose of upsetting the train and causing a catastrophe. It is fortunate that the train escaped so well, and that a number of lives were not sacrificed, as it carries generally a considerable complement of passengers. It was some time before the journey could be pursued. The police are investigating the matter. WAGES AND PUBLIC-HOUSES.âThe payment of wages to miners is prohibited by certain statutes of 1872 from being made in public-houses, beer- shops, &c. This prohibition Lord Stanhope proposes to extend to all workmen. The bill which he has introduced into the House of Lords on this subject directs. that no wages be paid to a "workman" at a public-house, beer-shop, or place for the sale of spirits, wines, cider, &c., or other house of entertainment, or in a garden or place belonging to it. The employer is himself made liable for any contravention of the measure in a payment on his behalf, unless he has taken all reasonable means in his power to prevent it. The maximum penalty for infringing the measure is fixed at £10, to be recovered by any person summarily. The "workmen" to whom the bill refers do not include domestic or menial servants, but all labourers, servants in husbandry, journey- men, artificers, handicraftsmen, and all other persons engaged in manual labour, of whatever age they may be. ON ADVERTISING.âThe Pall Mall Gazette, in an article on Country Literature, says-The local press has never been used for the advertisement of such books as are suitable to country readers, certainly not for the class hitherto chiefly borne in view and for convenience designated villager. The reason why such books have not been advertised in the local press is probably because the author and publisher had no idea of the market that exists in the country. For the most part readers in town (London) and suburbs only glance at the exciting portions of papers, and then cast them aside. Readers in the villages read every line from the first column to the last, from the title to the printer's address. The local papers are ploughed steadily through, just as the horses plough the field, and every furrow of type conscientiously followed from end to end, adver- tisements and all. The brewer's, the grocer's, the draper's, the ironmonger's advertisements (market-town tradesmen), which have been there month after month, are all read, and the slightest change immediately noted. If there were any advertisement of books suitable to their taste it would be read in exactly the same manner. So it would in a daily paper whenever it got to them. But in advertising for country people one fact must be steadily borne in mind-that they are slow to act; that is, the advertisement to produce any result must be permanent. A few insertions are forgotten before those who have seen them have made up their minds to purchase. When an advertisement is always there, by-and-by the thought suggested acts on the will and the stray coin is invested-it may be six months after the first inclination arose. The procrastination of country people is inexplicable to hurrying London men. But it is quite useless to advertise unless it is taken into account. If permanent, an advertisement in the local press will reach its mark. A "PAINFUL DOMESTIC QUARREL."âIt is not often that any one in the position of a marquis of the United Kingdom publishes in the newspapers one of those painful advertisements, in which he declares his determination to pay no debts that have been contracted without his specialauthority, which are not uncommon among the lower classes. Such an advertisement appears in the Times of Thursday, however, subscribed in the name of the Marquis of Anglesey, and if we may judge by paragraphs more or less precise which are published in some of the society journals, the advertisement is the outcome of a very painful domestic quarrel. The present Lord Anglesey succeeded his brother little more than two years ago, and shortly after his accession to the title he married, as his third wife, an American lady who was the widow of the liou. Renry W oodhouse, a brother of the present Lord liimberley.âLeeds Mercury.

THE RAILWAY TRAGEDY IN FRANCE.

MR. LESLIE ON THE ROYAL COLLEGE…

THE RECENT ATTEMPT ON THE…

Advertising

STRIKE OF COLLIERS IN NORTH…

CORRESPONDENCE.

[No title]

LOCAL MARKETS.

Family Notices

Advertising

DENBIGH.

BETTWS-Y-COED.

BANGOR.

MACHYNLLETH.

GARTH.

NORTH WALES COUNTIES ASSIZES.

THE HATTOM-GARDEN ROBBERY.

FIRING AT THE IRISH MAIL.

PARLIAMENT.

Advertising

HOME & FOREIGN CHIT-CHAT.

Advertising