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BISHOP OF MANCHESTER ON CHURCH…

CAPTAIN WEBB'S EXTRAORDINARY…

GREAT LOSS OF LIVES BY FIRE.

THE LIFE OF THE PRINCE CONSORT.

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THE GENERAL ELECTION.

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PARLIAMENT.

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OUR LONDON LETTER.

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OUR LONDON LETTER. [Ws do not hold ourselves responsible for the opinions of our Correspondent, -ED,] THERE is scarcely anything stirring save election matters; or rather the din of the contest drowns all else. It is surprising how far-reaching is the influence of a general election. It affects the money market, quickens certain businesses with tremendous speed, and renders others for the time almost im- possible. In the newspapers little else stands a chance of attention. Even the pulpit is roused and stimulated by the activity of the hour. The social world is disarranged, too, for candidates and their friends are busy in the country, canvassing in one way or another. The Easter holidays will be spent in an unusual manner. Many programmes are upset, and generally the effect is pretty much like an unexpected removal. Of course it had to come, and the sooner the better. All the prophets are out of it; indeed, prediction does not seem at all a modern gift. The dissolution neither came when it was momentarily expected, nor will Lord Beaconsfield's Parliament have the unique reputation in history of having lived as long as a Parliament could. Putting speculation aside, the truth is that the Premier dissolved when it best suited his purpose. This is simple, as indeed are many explanations which deserve credit. At no time for several years past has the diplomatic and political coast been so clear for a run to the country and as the future could not be looked into, and there was not very much of it to look into, now was taken as an acceptable time. Lord Beaconsfield is nothing if he is not a creator of uncommon combinations, and he has again displayed it in his choice of the experiment of an appeal to the country. The election will liberate much else than two or three millions of money. We were weary of the oft-repeated charges against the Government-of the Eastern Question, Berlin Treaty, Secret Conven- tion, Cyprus, Afghan and Zulu bothers, and the rest of it. Not that we lacked appreciation, but that we wanted to know What then ?" The next few weeks will be a harvest for those fellows who now appear with the shiniest of hats, talk in the loudest of voices, crack jokes with the merriest, and drink everybody else under the table. You know the style of man. He is never seen save at election times and, of course, he generally hails from London. He has not the slightest amount of conscience, and doesn't pretend to have any. He knows everything, and is a much sharper fellow than the candidate, who oftener than otherwise is not, it must be confessed, over-blessed with sense. For a season, also, drinks and guineas will be plenti- ful among what may be termed the camp followers of the election. Bribery and corruption did not pass away when the Act against them passed into operation. Newspaper proprietors, too, turn an honest penny out of the election addresses; and when they do jobbing- printing also the advantage is increased. Dr. Parker's candidature for the City of London -which seems to give people so much to talk about -is doing good by calling attention to the fact (often alluded to, but not disposed of for all that) that at present Parliamentary honours, as they are called, but Parliamentary duties, as the minister of the City Temple would term them, are only for the money-bags and that in this, as in much else, it is not brains, but £ s. d. which win. The whole subject is surrounded with difficulties. I should as little care to see the House filled with needy adven- turers as with brainless millionaires. A man without means can hardly spare the time for atten- ding at Westminster; and we are not quite so radical as to be indifferent whether our legislators are out at elbows or not. The Government Bill to amend and continue the Corrupt Practices Act, by allowing the conveyance of voters to the poll, is another step in favour of mere money-bags. Perhaps it was a ridiculous distinction to condemn in the borough what was permitted in the counties, and a prohibition without a penalty was of little effect in this naughty world. But I have a very strong opinion that the conveyance of voters in both county and borough should be forbidden, and that a voter who will not go to the poll unless he is carried there is better disfranchised. There is still much about our elections which makes them other than the free choice of enlightened and independent electors. Another objection which Dr. Parker takes is to personal canvassing that is, himself, hat in hand, begging people to give him their votes. Had I the power, I would do away with all kinds of canvas- sing, but particularly I would abolish that by candidates. It is a humiliation and a temptation to which no man should be subjected. I must con- fess that anyone who asks me how I shall vote is answered with more force than elegance, and that strict orders are issued in my household to slam the door in the face of the canvasser without the slightest pretence at ceremony. Very rude Which, pray? London, 18th March, 188).

GLADSTONE A DISRAELI.

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LLANGOLLEN ADVERTISER OFFICE,…

LOCAL MARKETS.

Family Notices

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