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BISHOP OF MANCHESTER ON CHURCH…

CAPTAIN WEBB'S EXTRAORDINARY…

GREAT LOSS OF LIVES BY FIRE.

THE LIFE OF THE PRINCE CONSORT.

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THE GENERAL ELECTION.

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PARLIAMENT.

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PARLIAMENT. There was a special sitting of the House of Lords on Saturday, to accelerate the progress of bills preparatory to the dissolution. The bill to relieve the distress in Ireland was read a third time and passed, and a consolidated fund bill was passed through all its stages. The Lancashire County Justices Bill was read a third time and passed. Several bills were read a second time, and a bill introduced by Lord Denman to facilitate interments was read a first time. Lord Bury announced in the House of Lords, on Monday, that the volunteer review at Brighton would be held on Easter Monday as first proposed, the law officers of the Crown being of opinion that it would be legal providing that no regular troops were brigaded with the volunteers. Replying to Lord Oranmore and Browne, the Premier said the Government had reason to believe that the anti-agitation in Ireland was subsiding, and he thought the existing law sufficiently strong to cope with the evils referred to. The royal assent was given to several bills, including that for the relief of the distress in Ireland. The Beer Dealers' Retail Licences Bill was read a third time, and several other measures were advanced a stage. In the House of Commons, Mr. Edward Jenkins gave notice of a question he would put to the Home Secretary the following day, which points to a suppositious case of very discreditable parliamentary and stock exchange jobbery. The question in effect asks the Home Secretary if he is aware, in view of the extraordinary operations on the stock exchange in Metropolitan Water Company shares, the secret of the Government Water Bill had been communicated by any one in the Home Office to any parties outside. This was followed by a notice of motion by the venerable O'Gorman Mahon, which is virtually a vote of censure on the Prime Minister for libelling the Home Rule party in his letter to the Lord-lieutenant of Ireland. In reply to Mr. Dilwyn, the Chancellor of the Exchequer stated that he hoped to got through the business of the House so that both Houses could assemble at half-past one on Wednesday, the 24th, for the prorogation. The Chancellor of the Exchequer afterwards moved the second reading of the Probates of Wills Bill, the general principles of which were vigorously condemned by Mr. Gladstone in an exhaustive speech. The debate was continued by Sir H. S. Ibbetson, Mr. Dodson, Mr. Hubbard, Sir G. Balfour, and others. In the House of Lords, on Tuesday, the bill to abolish the property qualification now the requisite of the councillors was read a second time. Lord Denman withdrew his bill to enable burials to take place in churchyards without any religious service, Lord Beaconsfield having suggested to him that his object would be better served if he re-introduced the measure in the new Parliament. Progress was made with a number of bills, amongst those which passed the third reading being the bill to further amend the Artisans' Dwellings Act. In the Commons, after several notices of motions had been given and questions disposed of, the second meeting of the Parliamentary Corrupt Practices Bill was vigorously opposed by Mr. Anderson, who declared that for the Government to push forward such a measure in a Parliament which was practically dissolved was "nothing less than an electioneering trick." He moved the rejection of the bill. Sir George Campbell seconded the motion, and a lively debate followed. The Chancellor of the Exchequer defended the bill; and he was followed by the Marquis of Hartington, who condemned the attempt to rush the measure through, when practically there was no house to discuss it. Ultimately the house divided, when it was agreed by 82 to 55 to go on with the bill. The house then went into committee on the measure, and on the motion of Mr. W. Holms, decided that the bill should not apply to Scotland or Ireland. There was a special sitting of the House of Lords on Wednesday afternoon, in which several bills were advanced a stage. In the Commons, on Wednesday, despite the strenuous efforts of a small band of Liberals, the Government forced forward the Corrupt Practices Bill, which legalises the payment of vehicles for bringing up voters at elections. The report of the Customs and Inland Revenue Bill, after some trifling modifications, was agreed to.

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OUR LONDON LETTER.

GLADSTONE A DISRAELI.

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LLANGOLLEN ADVERTISER OFFICE,…

LOCAL MARKETS.

Family Notices

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