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BISHOP OF MANCHESTER ON CHURCH…

CAPTAIN WEBB'S EXTRAORDINARY…

GREAT LOSS OF LIVES BY FIRE.

THE LIFE OF THE PRINCE CONSORT.

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THE LIFE OF THE PRINCE CONSORT. The concluding volume of Mr. Theodore Martin's Life of the Prince Consort was issued on Monday. There are very affecting passages in the volume. The story of the prince's death would have to be told by a veritable bunglerâwhich Mr. Martin is notâif it were not impressive. There are glimpses of home life given to us over the betrothal of the Princess Alice which are exceedingly interesting. A very fine portrait of the Prince, engraved by Holl, and less admirable ones of the Crown Princess of Prussia and of the Princess Alice, by the same hand, add to the value of the volume. On the 24th Nov., 1867, the prince wrote in his diaryâ"Am full of rheumatic pains, and feel thoroughly unwell. Have scarcely closed my eyes at night for the last fortnight." About this time there was much excitement throughout the country in consequence of the Trent affair, but that was in a measure overshadowed by the serious turn the illness of the prince had taken. On the 9th of December there were increased feverish symptoms, and it was said the illness was likely to continue some time. About six o'clock on the morning of the 14th of December, Mr. Brown, the medical attendant at the Castle, informed her Majesty that he had no hesitation in saying he thought the prince was much better, and that there was ground to hope that the crisis was over. "I went over at seven," her Majesty writes, "as I usually did. I went in, and never can forget how beautiful my darling looked, lying there with his face lit up with the rising sun, and his eyes unusually bright, resting, as it were, on unseen objects, and not taking notice of me." In another entry in her diary the Queen states- Later in the day Dr. Watson, in reply to a question, said-" We are very much frightened, but don't and won't give up hope." The pulse keeps up, and is not worse. They said every hour, every minute, was a gain and Sir James Clark was very hopeful, and he had seen much worse cases. But the breathing was alarming, it was so rapid. There was what they call a dusky line about his face and hands, which I knew was not good. I made some observation about it to Dr. Jenner, and was alarmed by seeing he seemed to notice it. Albert folded his arms, and began arranging his hair, just as ho used to do when well and dressing. This was said to be a bad sign. Strange, as though he was preparing for another and greatei: journey. "The Queen's distress was terrible," Mr. Martin observes. 44 She only left the prince's room for the adjoining one, and the doctors still continued to comfort her with hope. But they could not blind her to the signs that his precious life was ebbing away. About half-past five o'clock, the Queen sat down by his bedside. I Gutes franchen,' the prince ga,id, and kissed her, and then gave a sort of piteous moan, or rather sigh of pain, but, as if he felt he were leaving her, laid his head upon her shoulder. The children then kissed him. An hour later the breathing was gentler, and the Queen took his hand, 'which was already cold,' and knelt down by his side. The castle clock chimed the third quarter after ten o'clock just as the prince's features settled into the 'beauty of a perfectly serene repose.' Two or three long but gentle breaths were drawn, and the great soul had fled."

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THE GENERAL ELECTION.

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PARLIAMENT.

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OUR LONDON LETTER.

GLADSTONE A DISRAELI.

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LLANGOLLEN ADVERTISER OFFICE,…

LOCAL MARKETS.

Family Notices

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