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North versus South' .

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A PLUCKY WELSH LAD.

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A PLUCKY WELSH LAD. Jason's Sole Survivor Says He Will Go to Sea Again. Samuel .Toshua Evans, the sole survivor of the crew of 26 of the ill-fated Greenock-o-wned ship Jason, which stranded on the Newfound- land Coast on December 5 last, arrived at his father's house, in the country parish of Tregai-e, situate between Raglan and Dingestow, in the eastern end of Monmouthshire, on Wed- nesday. after travelling all night from Liver- pool, via. Hereford and Monmouth. His father, the Rev. William Evans, is rector of Tregare, a rural, sparsely-populated parish, and his gmndfatner is the liev. Samuel Evans, vicar of Marshfield and Peterstone, near Cardiff. The welcome home given to the shipwrecked son, whose life had been so providentially spared, was of the most endearing character on the part of his parents. Young Evans, who is a well-grown fellow, within a couple of months of his nineteenth birthday, was edu- cated at Monmouth Grammar School, and was in his earlier youth a great favourite amongst the young folk in the neighbourhood. He evinced a liking for the sea after he left school, and became, three years and a half ago, an apprentice to the well-known firm of Car- michael, of Greenock. The general outlines and most of the details of the story of the loss of the Jason and the whole of her crew of 26, except Mr. Evans, have already appeared in the "Western Mail." To one of our repre- SAMUEL J. EVANS I sentatives the story was re-told on Wednesday, but the facts related were substantially those which have already been published. It was from the starting of the voyage at Barry, in April, 1892, until the final wreck in December, 1893, a most lamentable and calamitous affair, as the damage to the ship and loss of life at different stages of her passage showed. After undergoing repairs for about six months at Mauritius, necessitated by the damage done by the eve-lone in the Indian Ocean, about 40 days' sail out of Calcutta,, the ship proceeded with her cargo of jute for Boston, Mr. Evans acting as third mate, in the absence of Captain M'Girr, who had hat! his leg broken. On December 5 they sighted Cape Cod, when the wind veered to the north, blowing very heavily, accompanied by a dense snowstorm. it was hoped that the cape could be rounded and the vessel taken up to Boston, but the wind caught her, and, carrying her away. stranded her on the first bar as the dusk of evening wa.s coming on. The ship broke in two. The crew rushed into the rigging, but the storm was such that they were struck with spars or washed away. Mr. Evans was. he stated, one of the first swept off the ship. Partly by the swell of the sea and partly by swim- ming, he was carried up to the beach, and the last thing he recollected seeing before he lost consciousness was the light of the life-saving crew. He could remember nothing more of the occurrences until he found himself in bed at the life-saving station. All his clothes and other belongings were lost, but he was furnished with a new rig-out and sent home by the Cunard steamer Cepha.lonia. With the exception of a slight cold and cough, he does not feel at present any ill-effects from his peri- lous experiences, and. although this was not the first time he had been in great dansrer, he states that it is his intention to follow the sea, For a short time. however, he will take a rest at home with his parents.

BEACONSFIELWS FLOWER.

SIR DAVID EVANS.

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