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F. TWISSELL, Market-place, Aberdare, wholesale and retail Glass and China dealer. Publicans and others supplied at short notice. O" Our reporter for Aberdare, Hirwain, Aberaman, Cwmbach, Trecynon, Cwmaman, and Cwmdare is *lr. P. Lewis, 11, Upper Regent-street, Aberdare, who will be pleased to be notified of meetings, held in any of the above places, and also to receive advertise- ments, &c. THE BEST AND CHOICEST CIGAlIS are sold by Miss Oeppeti, of Merthyr, who has taken over Mr. Wake's wholesale and retail tobacco and cigar business at Commercial-place, Aberdare. Good Cigar, five or "eyou for Is. All Tobaccos are sold at moderate Prices. Walking-sticks, Pouches, Cigar and Cigarette ~?ses, Pipes of a hundred different kinds, Fancy ipes, and other useful articles, suitable for Christmas ltll(1 New Year's Presents. Don't forget to give a call. Commercial-place, Aberdare. [5096 DKWI MABON.âA movement is on foot for making a suitable presentation to this popular gentleman. PERSONAL.âSir W. T. Lewis, Bart., is now con- valescent. t Mr. MERRIMAN'S TESTIMONIAL.âThis testimonial has been taken up well. PERSONAL.âLady Lewis, Miss Lewis, and Mr. H. Lewis have arrived at Adelaide, Australia. â TTLORSTOWN DISASTER.âThe Aberdare Grocers' Association have sent a guinea to the fund in aid of the sufferers at the above disaster. TYLORSTOWN DISASTER.âMrs. White, daughter of late D. Davies, Maesyffynon, Aberdare, has sent 5*>0 towards the fund in aid of the sufferers of the ylorstown disaster. Ministerial.âThe Rev. R. Morgan, C.C., is ea\ ing tjje town ta^e Up hj,- residence at Barry. Alie reverend gentleman's departure is much re- setted. I THKATKICAL.âMiss F. Raynor's company have occupying the boards of the New Public Hall P'jTheatie with The Curse of Gold and Slums 01 Paris." SAfALI.-Pox.-Another case of small-pox has been Parted. The victim came to the town from Ponty- J, 'dd and lodged in a house in Dare-street. He was etlioved to the Infectious Diseases Hospital. A r?MsiTy.âAt this place of worship on Sunday night, 2a'SS fillips, a favourite soloist from Carmarthen, to IK a ren(lering of Cowen's Promise of Life," "e delight of a large congregation, p ^REejiasonky.âWe are informed that the High ^table of Aberdare, Mr. L. N. Williams, has been yeacte(i W.M. of St. David's Lodge for the ensuing I)ay" The installation will take place on St. David's inPISTRlOT COUNCIL.âMr. J. W. Evans, C.C., as a candidate for No. 3 Ward at the thcoming District Council election. Mr.^ T. mas» Graig House, the retiring councillor, does 0t aeek re-election. ^Unitarian CHURCH, HIGHLAND-PLACE, ABERDARE, A series of discourses are being delivered on Sunday eningg at the above church on Protestant Princi- P,le* as Understood by Unitarians." Subject for February 23rd Further Reformation Needed." DAKoixs.âThe Teachers' Dancing Class was in. durated at the Constitutional Hall on Friday night. A Here was a good attendance, and the class is likely have a successful session. Mr. Notton is M.C., Jliss Phillips fee ret-ary, and Miss Morris, treasurer. Ane Aberdare Quadrille Club has been engaged to supply the music. THE LATE INSPECTOR.âAt a meeting of G.W.R. employees lately, it was decided to start a fund and Present the money to Mrs. Morgan, widow of the late Inspector Morgan. The deceased was a great favour- ite with the employees of the G.W.R., and his death is very deeply regretted. Sad ACCIDENT.â A very sad accident befel a youne man named W.lham J. John, living at Aberdare 2 Friday morning last. It appears that whilst an engine was being shunted at the Taff Railway Station the young man fell heavily w»iil«t jumping off the> engine, With the result that he broke his leg. He 1>eu,?UT remove(i to the hospital, where Dr. Jjor Jones amputated the leg. Triers.âThe Aberdare Harriers had two runs am in the direction of Cwmbach and Aber- â an» the course being three miles. There was a Tu nuif,ter on each occasion. The first four home at auH T*ay'8 run were O. Morgan, E. Lewis, J. Deere, Wer or ^>av'"H- The first three home on Thursday Mor £ an> E. Lewis, and Ivor Davies. On Rood ^?cas*on O. Morgan came in a good first, being a distance ahead of his competitors. DiI,^K.âAt the Empire Theatre this week Messrs. Car D anc^ Handon's Company are appearing in "A re-written by Edgar Rodney and tjjL "on. The play is in three acts. Next week tainm a Kreat attraction at this place of enter- havei601' w^en the Steens will appear. The Steens an(j described as exceptionally clever artistes, freDi t'6 ⢠ve no doubt but that they will sustain their o-j- ation next week. Their feats are of an extra- tory nature- I)av^NlNG School.âOn the 11th instant Mr. Thomas abll,es'j s"rvey°r'. Cwmaman Colliery, read a very foil ^nstructive paper on "Explosives." The' AT °wmg took part in the discussion :âMessrs. Fisher Da r £ an> Spring Hill Villa J. E. Davies, and T. E. Gadlys D. R. Llewellyn, surveyor, Bwllfa CwVa Shaw, junior, Gadlys; and Rees Owen, ain ainan'- Mr- Alljel't Railton, surveyor, Aber- an> presided. The paper was so important that all f?eni'-{ers could not have sufficient time to tackle 25th ePoints, so the debate was adjourned until the will lns^ant, when it is to be hoped that the paper >u be well thrashed out. A cordial welcome is ended to all to attend. ar« WISS CHOIR.âMr. Arthur Brogden's Swiss Choir m Paying a welcome return visit to Aberdare, com- v ttClno to-night (Thursday) at the Public Hall. We e Ve Qo doubt but that there will be crowded audi- i °Ces fach night. Mr. Brogden has undertaken to produce a new male party, headed by Gwyn Alaw, l>opular Welsh tenor. It was Mr. Brogden who p roduced the Welsh party, now at the London â¢spire, to an English audience. Next Sunday the a>f\,r giyo two sacred concerts. A special 0j ?a 'tion of the choir is Miss Ada Le Butt, the lrv°yant and medium, and whose marvellous per- "â¢nances must V>e seen to be appreciated. R A Boo STORY.âThe Elyiu Courant and Courier Ute-s a remarkable story respecting a dog owned by â¢ir* Douald Cameron, brother to Mr. Cameron, Chfton-street, Aberdare. Here is the stoiy: of stor'es have generally to l>e taken with a grain J Salt, as the saying goes, but I am able this week to jpve you a genuine one. Mr. Donald Cameron, Aorul>reck, has a collie dog rejoicing in the euphonious name of 'Peter.' Peter is a dog of no ordinary j*lent. He is the niont intelligent dog we have ever ad in our glen. If his master wishes to communi- ate with any of the farms round about, a note is "Tttten and given to Peter, who has the route pointed QI!t to him and away he goes. He delivers his letter ith apeed and certainty, and hies him home again. entrusted with a parcel, the contents of which >,Very other dog would be only too ready to devour, j resists all temptation, and recognising that he s&dog with a mission, delivers his parcel untouched, and nat after a tramp of perhaps a mile. He is most useful a« delivering letters. The Post Office at Bridge of Ti°n two miles distant, and letters have to be galled for. When anyone from the district is there y^ey take the letters for all. If Mr. Cameron does so brings tbem home. Peter takes a great pride in delivering them. Perhaps he may yet go for them. t is not too much to expect, seeing that he never got auy training, but took to it spontaneously. I have 0Qly imperfectly recounted Peter's ability, but it has one recommendation-it is a true tale. Can any of your readers go one better ?'' AMATEUR CONCEIlT.-On Thursday, Feb. 13th, an aOlateur concert was held at the Bowen Jenkins M-emoriul Hall. The concert was got up by Mrs. **ees, Maesyffynon, and Miss Joseph-Watkin, the Proceeds being in aid of procuring a piano for the Aberdare Girls' Club. The concert proved a very suc- Oftsful one, and the ladies in question are to be con- gratulated upon the success that has attended their praiseworthy efforts. The hall had been prettily decorated with flowers, evergreens, and plants, kindly Siven by Mrs. Rees, Maesyffynon Mrs. James â ^wis, Plasdraw and Mrs. Rees, Glandare. The Jjhairman for the evening was the Vicar of Aberdare. be violincello solo, by Mr. Morgan Morgan, was very creditable, and the recitation, Firm Friends," by Miss Nancy Rees and Miss Tickey Morris, was so ^vell given as to command an encore. The flute solo, W Mr. Gregorie, was a very artistic performance, and ~*r. Phil Rhys' recitation took well. All the other 'tems were also greatly appreciated. We append a £ °Py of the programme Pianoforte duet, The ^aliph of Bagdad," Mrs. Rees and Miss Joseph- catkin song, "The Promise of Life," Miss Beatrice Lewis violincello solo, Gondoliera"â" Mazurka," Morgan Morgan song, Y Deryn Pur," fvev. J. S. Longdon^; recitation, Firm Friends," â "liss Nancy Rees and Miss Tickey Morris (encored) song, The Old, Old Way," bfrs, Bankes, with violin ^oligato by Miss Edwards trio, Selection from ^artha," Mrs. Rees, Miss Edwards, and Mr. Jfregorie duet, Oh, That we Two Were Maying," i}}e Misses Churchill; violin solo, A Spanish ^ance," Miss Edwards glee, Oh Hills, Oh Vales ?f Pleasure," Glee Party pianoforte solo, Regatta ^eneziana," Mrs. Rees; song, "Flight of Ages," *iss Beatrice Lewis; mandoline and piano duet, La Serenata Yalaeca," Miss Ida Joseph-Watkin ?^d Miss Joseph Watkm; song, Simon the ^ellarer," Mr. Davies; recitation, selection from Mark Twain," Mr. Phil Rhys; song, "Love's ^octurne," Miss Alice Joiies flute solo, Air.'j *,rom the Bohemian Girl," Mr. Gregorie song, Yn ^yft'ryn Clwyd," Rev. J. S. Longdon glee, Starry frowns of Heaven," Glee Tarty; finale, God Save the Queen." B.W.T.A.âA meeting of the Aberdare Branch of the British Women's Temperance Association was held at Trinity Vestry on Monday afternoon, when there was a good attendance.âMrs. Jayne opened the meeting with prayer; an address was afterwards given by Mrs. Udell, of Pontypwl. She emphasised the importance of practical Christianity. The world would look coldly on those Christians who did not think it their duty to talk to other people about their souls. There was also necessity for people professing Temperance to act up to their principles. People were often a 'ked as to whether there was harm in taking a glass of beer. She (the speakor) maintained that it was the duty of Christians to wash their hands clear of the drink. There were people to-day under the curse of drink who traced tneir downfall to the first glass. They took this one glass because they saw professing Christiana do so. They said It Christian people can take a glass of beer so can I." And this had done more harm to the Tem- perance cause than anything. It was use- less to profess principles of total abstinence and not act up to those principles afterwards. People should not hide their principles under a cloak. She appealed to the supporters of Temperance to be faith- ful to their principles and not be faint-hearted. They must not only lead beautiful godly lives, but try ana exert a, Christian influence over others. They required earnestness and practical common sense to carry on the workâMrs. Reed proposed, and Mrs. Grattan seconded, a vote of thanks of thanks to Mrs. Udell for her interesting address, which was carried.âMrs. Lloyd, Highland-place, said that their friends at Cwmaman intended forming a branch, and she (Mrs. Lloyd) hoped that as many of the Aberdare Temper- ance ladies as could would attend and help the Cwm- aman friends to start their branch. There was also a similar branch to be started at Aberaman,âMrs. Wil- liams, Canon-street, gave a few encouraging worda.and the meeting concluded with the Benediction.-Miss George, Cardiff-road, was the accompanist. All pre- sent subsequently enjoyed "a fragrant cup of tea." WHAT THE REFORMATION DID FOR MEN. On Sunday night the third of a series of sermons on Protestant Principles as understood by Unitarians was given at Highland-place Unitarian Church, Aberdare, by the pastor, the Rev. Jenkin Thomas. The subject was "What the Reformation did for Men." In order to form an adequate judgment of what the Reformation did for men we must, said the reverend gentleman, understand what the Reforma- tion stands for, what causes brought it about, and why it should be necessary. The very word Reformation implies that an improvement, or a reconstruction, has happened to something men understood that religious and moral questions were in a somewhat unsatisfactory condition, and they endeavoured to throw more light on them. Reforma- tion may be described as a revolt against finality in religion. Mr. Thomas then went on to speak of the supreme rule of the Catholics and the monastic period. A graphic description was given of Catholic persecution, and reference made to the immorality of the monasteries. The convents became the hot-beds of vice; all the monasteries were wealthy, and the monks lived in great high revelry; the best wines wore stored in their cellars; shocking immoralities took place; monastic scandals were frequent occurrences; the vices of the clergy were the by- words of satirists and theologians, and ljepame the subject of poems and novels; every narish priest could buy a dispensation from his bishop to secure the safety of himself and his unacknowledged wife and children. The exactions of the Roman See were almost unbearable. To every big sinner it sold for a small sum a safe conduct to Heaven, a paper which secured him absolution from all sins. Then came the Reformation and the work of Martin Luther and other Reformers. The Lutheran church was too much engaged in controversy to nourish the self-forgetfulness necessary for successful missionary work. And we know that it is Calvinism that has presented to the world the true missionary spirit. It has been said that Catholicism is a religion of priests, Lutheranism of theologians, and Calvinism the religion of the believing congrega- tion. Lutheranism is more human, inasmuch as it crystalises round the idea of justification by faith. Here man had some part to play in the great scheme of salvation. Reference was also made to Wickliffe, Cranmer, Zwingli, and other stars of the Reformation. The Reformation in England is a case of arrested development. The influences were not allowed to be carried out to their logical conclusions. And this is true of all Reformation. It is only a shifting of position. It made the Bible supreme authority for the Church. It enunciates freedom of thought, free- dom for every individual to think out theological questions for himself; but in enunciating this, it also sets up barriers in tho form of creeds and formulas to be believed by every Christian. It gave birth to scientific researches; it gave new impulses to com- mercial activities and intellectual and philosophical studies. But it failed to make man, with his reasoning powers and moral consciousness, the final authority on religious matters: men are still clogged by the past, and are not allowed true liberty to ascend to the spiritual world for the eternal realities. This is the work of the future. CHRISTIAN ENDEAVOUR MEETINGS AT ABERDARE. In response to the invitation of the Aberdare and District Union of the Christian Endeavour Society, the Council of the South Wales and Monmouthshire Union of that society decided to hold their annual meetings at Aberdare on Thursday last. There were delegates present from Cardiff, Newport, Swansea, Blackwood, Llanelly, Aberavon, Dowlais, Merthyr, Ynysybwl, Port Talbot, Ebbw Vale, Hirwain, Ton Ystrad, and other places. The proceedinsrs commenced at 11a.m., when the Council met at the Royal Temperance Hotel. The Rev. Charles Ayliffe, of Newport, the chairman of the Council, presided. Various matters were discussed. Amongst others, it was decided to procure suitable literature, bearing upon the principles of the society, for distribution in districts where the society is not at present represented. The annual report as to the work of the society was also submitted, and considered very satisfactory. Attention was drawn to the annual convention of the society which was to be held at Bristol, when the Board of Management will be elected and other important business transacted. It was decided to nominate the Rev, Charles Ayliffe, Newport, Rev. J. R. Davies, Port Talbot, and Mr. E, J. Powell, Newport, as South Wales representa- tives on the Board of Management, and all the branches of the society in South Wales will be asked to support the candidature of these gentlemen. At the conclusion of the sitting, the members of the Council and friends sat down to dinner, which had been well catered by Host Davies. At 3 p.m., a general meeting was held at the English Congregational Church, when there was a large congregation. The Rev. J. Grawys Jones occupied the chair. After the singing of the hymns, "There's a Royal Banner given for Display" and "Let us Gather up the Sunbeams," and the offering up of prayer, the President gave a practical and encouraging address. Miss A. M. Thomas then sang Flee as a Bird very prettily. Miss Tydfil Davies, of Hirwain, followed with a paper on Our Juveniles," which elicited warm approval and com- mendation. The hymn, All the Way My Saviour Leads me," was sung, and Mr. Worman gave an able paper on the "C.E. Movement." Mr. W. J. Davies, Cwmbach, rendered The Holy City" in nice style, and a discussion on papers and "Free Parlia- ment" ensued, the speeches being limited to three minutes each. After the hymn, I Know not why God's Wondrous Grace," had been sung, Mr. Parr, Aberdare, moved, and Mr. W. Kees seconded, resolu- tions of sympathy with the persecuted Armenians and the sufferers of the Tylorstown disaster. The hymn, Blessed Assurance, Jesus is Mine," was sung, and the Benediction was pronounced. A tea and reunion subsequently took place at the Tanernacle Schoolroom, when a large number sat down at the tables, which were well provisioned and tastily laid out. The room had been charmingly decorated with evergreens and flowers given by Mr. W. Phillips, the local presi- dent, Miss Farr, Miss Rose Morris, and Miss Thomas, Compton House. On the walls were the words Mi/pan and Welcome in white letters, worked on a red ground. Whilst on the subject of decoration we may also state that the mottoes For Christ and the Church and Success to Young People's Society of Christian Endeavour adorned the walls of the church. The ladies who presided at the tea-tables were: Mrs. D. M. Richards, Mrs. Reeves, Miss Rose Morris, Miss Davies, Miss Thomas, Miss Bessie Richards, from Tabernacle Miss Lloyd and Miss Griffiths, from Trinity Mrs. Grawys Jones and Miss M. A. Edwards, from Ebenezer; Miss Williams and Miss Jones from Carmel and Miss Davies and Miss Bevan, from Hirwain. Another general meeting was held at 6.45 p.m., when Mr. W. Phillips presided and gave an interest- ing opening address. The speaker referred to the progress of the C.E. movement, and said that there 3,329 branch societies at the present time. The pro- gress had oeen exceedingly rapid, and the movement had proved a great blessing to many. He urged upon those churches at Aberdare and elsewhere, that had not yet taken up the movement, to do so at once, and thereby help to further the noble principles of the society He also extended a hearty welcome to all the visitors to Aberdare. Mr. Powell, the secretary of the South Wales Union, in responding to the words of welcome, thanked Mr. Phillips for his kindly feeling towards them. They had all enjoyed their visit to Aberdare, and the preparations that were made far exceeded their expectations The hymn, While Jesus Whispers to you," was sung and prayer offered up, after which Mr. Abel Jones rendered a very attractive solo from The Elijah." Mrs. Reeves also sang The Chorister very sweetly. This was followed by an admirable 1 address on For Christ and the Church," the motto I of the C.E.S., by the Rev. Charles Ayliffe. The hymn, Jesus, Keep me near the Cross," was sung, and the Rev. D. Wynne Evans, Llanelly, gave a Welsh address on Y Nerth i'r Ymdrech Christion- ogol (The Power for the C.E.), which was atten- tively listened to. Mr. William Gwynne rendered Merch y Cadben in appreciative style, and the meeting concluded by the singing of the hymn, There shall be Showers of Blessings," and prayer. At 8.20 p.m., a consecration meeting was held, con- ducted by Mr. W. Anthony Hughes, Cardiff, member of the Council of Great Britain and Ireland. The hymn, Take my life and let it be," "as sung and the roll-call of societies was (rone through. The Rev. M. Hughes read a letter that had been received from the founder of the society, and it occasioned much in- terest. Mr. W. Phillips, proposed a resolution con- gratulating the society on the success that had atten- ded its work and appealing to all churches that were not at present represented to form branches of the society. The Rev. D. M. Davies, Cwmbach, seconded the resolution, which was carried unanimously. The meeting terminated with Praise and Mizpah Benediction and the singing of the hymn, God be with you till we meet again," and this brought a suc- cessful day's proceedings to a close. We may mention that Miss Farr ably carried out the duties of accompanist. Assistance in the carrying out of the day's programmo waa also given by Mr, James Jones, Ynysllwyd-streot; Mr. T. Jones, Mr.. Taylor, Bute-street Mr. George Thomas, Seymour- street and Mr. Beynon Jones (secretary).

MERTHYR COUNCIL.

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