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THE DISTRESS IN JAMAICA AMONGST…

BRUTAL MURDER IN STAFFORDSHIRE.

FALLING IN OF THE ROOF OF…

TWO YOUNG BEGINNERS IN CRIME.I

HOOTINGS FROM THE" OWL." ^j\

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MR. GLADSTONE AND THE WORKING…

A YOUNG LADY'S LARKS.

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THE JAMAICA COMMITTEE.

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THE JAMAICA COMMITTEE. A special meeting of this committee was held on Monday evening at Ridley's Hotel; Mr. P. A. Taylor, M.P., in the chair. Amongst those present were Sir T. F Buxton, M P., Mr. Bright, M.P., Mr. John Stuart Mill, M.P., Mr. Charles Buxton, M.P., Mr. J. Burke, solicitor of Kingston, Jamaica, Mr. W. Shaen, Professor Goldwin Smith, Mr. Ludlow, Mr. Frederick Harrison, and Mr. M'Arthur. The Chairman exDlaineu that it had become neces- sary to call the meeting in consequence of the letter which Mr. Charles Buxton had published, resigning the chairmanship of the committee, on the ground that he dissented from the resolution to prosecute Mr. Eyre for the murder of Mr. Gordon. He (Mr. Tayior) thought that Mr. Buxton was in error m mating that the Jamaica Committee had decided by a msjo- rity that Mr. Ejyra Bhould be proeeeuted for tte murder of Mr. Gordon, either through the ment or by Mrs. Gordon." Nowthefact wag,,n0 resolution went no further than thia-that^the1 co mittee thought the Government ought to institu.e a prosecution, and that they wou;d .up ^r not do so, and that in the event of the Government not doing so, they would give Mrs. Gordon everv a^i ance if she prosecuted (hear). Having dwelt upon the extreme inconvenience of the coursa Mr. Bux.oa had thought fit to follow, and after/e}erPH|QtomK Gordon's unwillingness to prosecute, lest she mignu appear to be influenced by PWBona1 vengeance, a*. Taylor said the question to be decided W.is-on wha.t principle were they prepared, for the future, to act (hMr.' C?Buxton, M.P., said that what occurred was this:âThere were two meetings he,ld question of prosecuting Mr. Eyre, and a., the last meet- ing it was decided to prosecute by^a division 0 111 to o. Next day he saw the resolution published in papers, not the slightest hint being given that there was any difference of opinion in the commit.ee. Iu W*s impossible that he could allow his P°^!0^fTw eo^ld ence to this matter to be misunderstood. If they could have prosecuted Mr. Eyre for misg°yernmg^th<3 colony he would have been ready to. taki a°tl°n^rf1^v oht but he oould not look upon biua as bemg guilty o^ne deliberate murder of Mr. Gordon. ith respect to Mrs. Gordon, he had not seen or communicated with her, and the act of which the chairman spoiie mnEu have been voluntary on her part, as far ar he knew. Mr. Bright, M.P., said that Mr. Buxton wa" quite at liberty to differ from the committee, and it the difference was on a matter of vital importance, withdraw from the committee bu.t he had not done that. The committee did not even divide; and he (Mr. Bright) went away from the meeting under uhe impression that Mr. Buxton, seeing the great majority of the committee on one side, might probably feel him- self able to go with them. Two days after they saw HllB very letterâthis very speech made at the meeting-in the newspapers, although there were no means to report the observations of members on the otuer side of the question. When he (Mr. Bright,, moved uhe resolutions with regard to the prosecution of Mr. Evre he put them in words naving special reference to the pdnt whether Mrs. Gordon would uptake the prosecution or not, as he had not come to the co elusion that it was desirable for the committee to pro- secute if Mrs. Gordon womd nave notuin^, to Q0 ^t^ the prosecution. As to pwseoutiug Mr. t,re for a misdemeanour, Mr. Baxton spoke of the crime m; if ij was not murder. Ho (Mr, Bnsht) r^ meeting of Parliament he discussed this E one of the oldest and. most ^^Sfpreinfe alone, but before several persone-that in his whole life he had never seen or known a ca^e more distinctly of murder than the putting of Mr. Gordon to death. Hia opinion distinctly and cleany was vhat if Mrs. Gordon was willing in her own name to commence rvroeeedines with a prosecution of Mr. Eyre, the oom- mittee should undertake to collect func.s and give -er Euoh legal assistance as was in their power (hear, hear). But if Mrs. Gordon was prevented by anybody from prosecuting, and was altogether against snch a thing as a prosecution, it would make tne position Ot the committee more difficult, and the whole question would have to be re-considered. Mr. Ludlow moved" That this committee approves and confirms the resolutions passed by the execute committee on the 26th of June." L.. Professor Goldwin Smith seconded the rssolu.ion in an able speech. Sir T. F. Buxton defended the course pursueu by Mr. C. Buxton. Several members of the committee having spoken, The resolution was carried, there being but one diE- S6DOnett motion of Mr. Beales, Mr, John Staart MiU, M.P., was unanimously elected chairman of the 00m mMr.0 Mill, M.P., said Gentlemen, I thank you for this honour and mark of your confidence. I accept the post you have given me (cheers). I do so in the foil conviction that the objects of this committee are simply to ascertain whether there exists in this country any means for making a British functionary responsible for blood unlawfully shed-(applause)â and whether that be murder or not. I believe it to be murder (hear, hear). This committee ought not to Test until it obtains from the legislature the assurance that men like Mr. Eyre will be made responsible fcr their criminal actions (hear, hear). Votes of tha.nks were passed to Messrs. Gorne and. Payne for their services in Jamaica, and to the chair- man, after which the meeting separated. ââââ='

THE RAILWAY AND THE LONDON…

... IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT. ..

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POLICY OF FRANOE IN THE WAR.