Hide Articles List

14 articles on this Page

THE DISTRESS IN JAMAICA AMONGST…

BRUTAL MURDER IN STAFFORDSHIRE.

FALLING IN OF THE ROOF OF…

TWO YOUNG BEGINNERS IN CRIME.I

HOOTINGS FROM THE" OWL." ^j\

[No title]

MR. GLADSTONE AND THE WORKING…

News
Cite
Share

MR. GLADSTONE AND THE WORKING MEN OF LONDON. A general meeting of the London Working Men's Association was held on Tuesday evening in the hall of the Brougham Dining Company, Fleet-street, Mr. George Potter in the chair, for the purpose of re- ceiving the reply from Mr. Gladstone to the invitation from the association to attend a public meeting of the working men of London, and to decide as to the hold- ing of an open air meeting in the City. The Secretary read the following letter from Mr. Gladstone:â 11, Carlton-house-terrace, Jaly 2, 1866. Gentlemen,âI have the honour to acknowledge your letter of the 29th. In that latter, on behalf of the London Working Men's Association, you invite me to attend a publio meeting which they propose to hold for the purpose of thanking me for what I have done, or endeavoured to do, in their vindication against attacks which they term insults and calumnies, and of which I must own that it is difficult to visit them with any terms of censure more severe than they deserve. It is with reluctance that I decline any invitation proceeding from a portion of my fellow-subjects to whom our electoral laws, as they exist, accord less I liberally than to others the regular constitutional faci- lities for making known theis wishes and for the repre- sentation of their interests. The force of this con- sideration is, however, diminished, when I recollect how well and nobly, during the recent Parliamentary struggle, the cause which I believe to be that not less of loyalty and order than of freedom and of liberal policy, has been defended by the representatives of the metropolis. If there be a single exception, it only serves to exhibit more conspicuously the general truth of my assertion. I am obliged to excuse myseil from accepting your flattering in iiitation-first, because I feel that, after the labours of the last five months, prudence compels me to look for some comparative repose; and, secondly, because I am convinced that I shall best Eerve the cause which, in unison with my distinguished colleagues, and under our long-tried leader, I have had in hand, by confining my humble efforts in political debate as far as possible-first, to my place in the House of Commons and, secondly, to any occasion when I meet my nume- rous constituents in Lancashire. "In saying this, I shall not be supposed to indicate a disposition to recede from the ground on which we have stood daring the contest. I look upon the recent resignation by Lord Russell's Government of their offices as one more onward step towards the accom- plishment of their object; and in the hour of defeat I have the presentiment of victory. By a scrupulous moderation in fixing the limita of our original design, by a careful deference to every wish of the House of Commons in regard to methods of procedure, and by an unflinching firmness in resist- ing every effort, direct or covert, to impair the scheme or lessen the amount of enfranchisement we proposed, we sought to unite the conditions mpst likely to ensure success in an undertaking marked in former years by so many miscarriages and failures. Whether our plan so many miscarriages and failures. Whether our plan is finally to be added to the list of these miscarri- ages remains yet to be seen. To wait with patience the course of present events, to be especially on our guard against any illusory or reactionary measure simulating the mme and character of Reform, to encourage the oaim, serious, orderly, and temperate expression of opinion, seem to be the ohief duties of the hour; and in discharging these duties I am per- Buaded we shall show we are not less (we even think we are rather more) entitled than our opponents to the character of good citizens, of true-hearted Britons, and of affectionate and loyal subjects.âI have the honour to be, gentlemen, your very faithful servant, W. E. GLADSTONE.-To the Presidcst, (Mr. George Potter) and the Secretary (Mr. R. Hartwell) of the London Working Men's Association." The reading of the letter was received with louct 1 cheers. s I Mr. Northhouse then movetl the following resolu- 1 tion:â(iThat in order to give every facility to the working classes and the people of the metropolis^ to express their opinions in favour of the full enfranchise- ment of the people, and their determination to oppose the continuance of any Government in office that will not bring forward, with the intention of carrying, a full and complete Reform Bill, this association is of opinion that open air meetings should be held ii Lon. don at least ODC evening in each week, duringr the pre- seat season, saoh jandotiogr to be called alternately, by the execmsive committee of the association and the Central Council of the Reform Leaerue." Mr. Bligh seconded the resolution, which was sup- ported by Messrs. Troup and Lewis, and carried unani. mously Mr. Adams moved "That this association call a meeting of the working men of the City of London and adjacent districts for next Monday evening1, either in the Guildhall-yard, or in the open space in front of the Royal Exchange, as may be found most convenient by the committee, &nd that a deputation wait on the Lord Mayor on Wednesday morning in reference to such meeting." Mr. Glasier seconded the resolution, which was supported by Mr. Jenkins, and carried with 10u\\ cheers. The committee having been instructed to carry out the details, the meeting adjourned with a vote of I thanks to the chairman.

A YOUNG LADY'S LARKS.

[No title]

THE JAMAICA COMMITTEE.

THE RAILWAY AND THE LONDON…

... IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT. ..

[No title]

POLICY OF FRANOE IN THE WAR.